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Thread: 'Survivor' winner Hatch indicted for tax evasion

  1. #31
    FORT Fogey my3boyz's Avatar
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    Never mind. I just read earlier in the thread that he backed out of the plea. What an idiot! I hope they really throw the book at him. He is so arrogant about it. That is what gets to me. If maybe he showed some remorse I would feel sorry for him.

  2. #32
    *Until Next Season...* karalott's Avatar
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    Just saw an alert that Hatch was found guilty and that the judge ordered him to go to jail immediately because he's considered a flight risk. While the newsanchor was talking about his woes, it showed Hatch back in his glory days attending the Emmy's right after winning Survivor. Nothing like jail to wipe that huge obnoxious grin off his face

  3. #33
    For Your Entertainment lobeck's Avatar
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    Hatch Guilty of Failing to Pay Taxes By RAY HENRY, Associated Press Writer

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Richard Hatch, who won $1 million in the first season of "Survivor," was found guilty Wednesday of failing to pay taxes on his winnings.

    Hatch was handcuffed and taken into custody after U.S. District Judge Ernest Torres said he was a potential flight risk.

    He also was convicted of evading taxes on $327,000 he earned as co-host of a Boston radio show and $28,000 in rent on property he owned. He was acquitted of seven bank, mail and wire fraud charges.

    Hatch, 44, faces up to 13 years in prison and a fine of $600,000. Sentencing was scheduled for April 28.

    Jurors deliberated for less than a day after more than a week of testimony.

    Besides the tax charges, prosecutors accused Hatch of using money donated to his charitable foundation, Horizon Bound, an outdoors program he planned to open for troubled youth. He allegedly spent the money on expenses including tips to a limousine driver, dry cleaning and tens of thousands of dollars on improvements to a house he owned.

    Near the end of the trial, an explanation for Hatch's failure to pay taxes was raised by his lawyer but never mentioned in the jury's presence. Hatch's lawyer, Michael Minns, said Hatch caught fellow contestants cheating and struck a deal with the show's producers to pay his taxes if he won. But Hatch was never asked about the allegation when he testified.

    Instead, Minns told jurors that Hatch, who lives in Newport, was the "world's worst bookkeeper" and said his client never meant to do anything wrong.

    Hatch testified that he thought producers were supposed to pay his "Survivor" taxes, and said the donations he took from his charity were far less than the money he had already poured into it.

    More than five years after winning, Hatch remains reality TV's most famous villain, the man viewers loved to hate. He first captured their attention for shedding his clothes on "Survivor," prompting David Letterman to call him "the fat naked guy."

    But he made the biggest impression and won the show by scheming his way to the top. He reveled as squabbles among his fellow contestants thinned their ranks, connived with teammates to stick together then pitted his allies against each other.

    Early on, he used his success on the show to get more work, including a "Got Milk?" ad and an appearance on "Survivor All-Stars" where he was voted off by fellow contestants.

    He also appeared on TV game shows, including "The Weakest Link." That appearance, made on behalf of Horizon Bound, netted a $10,000 donation to his charity camp money prosecutors said was among the funds misused.

    But Hatch's shrewdness did not serve him well in the legal world. A year ago, prosecutors offered him a deal: plead guilty to two counts of tax evasion and they would recommend less than the maximum 10-year sentence.

    After initially agreeing, Hatch walked away, retaining Minns as his new lawyer and appearing on NBC's "Today" show to claim that CBS was supposed to pay the taxes.

    Prosecutors responded with a grand jury, which indicted Hatch on 10 counts carrying a maximum of 73 years in prison and millions of dollars in fines.

    During the trial, prosecutors called witnesses, including Mark Burnett, executive producer of "Survivor."

    Burnett testified that Hatch's "Survivor" contract stated he would have to pay taxes on his prize. Minns never asked him about the cheating allegation, and Burnett and CBS declined to comment about it.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060125/...survivor_taxes

  4. #34
    RESIDENT JEDI MASTER Stargazer's Avatar
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    I wonder what constitutes a "flight risk"? It doesnt look like someone as well known as Hatch, who has a child in the United States, would be that likely to flee. Are their legal guidelines about who is a "flight risk" or is that up to the sole discretion of the judge?

    Hatch should have just fessed up and pleaded guilty to begin with. They probably would have let him pay what he owed, paid a fine, and given him six months or something. The courts are often hesitant to send someone to jail for ten years for what could have been an innocent mistake. However, Hatch just kept fighting it and giving a thousand different excuses for why it wasn't his fault. Now he'll be lucky if they just give him four or five years.
    "Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter."- Yoda

    "I'll just see where Providence takes me and try to look like I got there confidently." - Craig Ferguson

  5. #35
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karalott View Post
    Just saw an alert that Hatch was found guilty and that the judge ordered him to go to jail immediately because he's considered a flight risk. While the newsanchor was talking about his woes, it showed Hatch back in his glory days attending the Emmy's right after winning Survivor. Nothing like jail to wipe that huge obnoxious grin off his face
    Poor Hatch, he won't even have Sue Hawk to rub up against when he gets to where he is going. But I bet big Bubba will give it a shot.

  6. #36
    Wait, what? ArchieComic Fan's Avatar
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    another article - it mentions sentencing is on April 28 so I'm not sure if the five years others have stated is correct or not.

    http://www.cnn.com/2006/LAW/01/25/su....ap/index.html

  7. #37
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    This explains the flight risk, among other things. He got lucky he wasn't found guilty on all counts. I hope they hit him really hard in the wallet with fines.

    'Survivor' Winner Ordered Held Until Sentencing

    PROVIDENCE -- Richard Hatch, who won $1 million in the debut season of the reality show "Survivor," was found guilty Wednesday of failing to pay taxes on his winnings and immediately taken into custody. Hatch remained calm and nodded slightly as the court clerk read the verdict. He waved goodbye to his mother, sister and husband, then was handcuffed and taken into custody. U.S. District Judge Ernest Torres said Hatch was a potential flight risk.

    The charges carry a maximum of 13 years in prison. Torres said he expected a sentence of between 33 months and 41 months, but it could be longer because prosecutors accuse Hatch of committing perjury during his testimony. Sentencing is scheduled for April 28. Hatch, 44, of Newport, was also convicted of evading taxes on $327,000 he earned as co-host of a Boston radio show and $28,000 in rent on property he owned. Hatch's lawyer, John MacDonald, said he would appeal the verdict Wednesday based on "errors of law" that he did not detail. He said Hatch knew it was possible he would go to jail.

    "Rich has been going through this now for three years and he's prepared himself mentally and emotionally for this date," MacDonald said.
    Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrew Reich said prosecutors were pleased with the verdict. "Obviously, nobody likes paying taxes, but we all have to pay our fair share," Reich said outside the courthouse.

    Torres said Hatch never accounted for a significant portion of his money, including the "Survivor" prize, which he said could be used to flee.
    Prosecutor Lee Vilker said Hatch was married to a man from Argentina whose visa expires next month, and that Hatch has claimed he lost an old copy of his passport. Vilker said Hatch also failed to tell his probation officer that he owns 30 properties in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    One possible explanation for Hatch's failure to pay taxes was raised by his attorney toward the end of the trial but was never mentioned in the jury's presence. Hatch's lawyer, Michael Minns, said Hatch caught fellow contestants cheating and struck a deal with producers for the show to pay his taxes if he won. But, ultimately, Hatch was never asked about the allegation when he testified. Instead, Minns told jurors Hatch was the "world's worst bookkeeper" and said his client never meant to do anything wrong. Hatch testified that he thought producers were supposed to pay his "Survivor" taxes, and said the donations he took from his charity were far less than the money he had already poured into it.

    One juror, Robert Paquette, 43, of West Greenwich, said in a telephone interview that jurors believed Hatch had legitimate questions about who was responsible for paying his "Survivor" taxes. But he said Hatch crossed the line when he didn't report income from his rental property and radio show.
    "Even if you take the 'Survivor' money out of there, there was still a lot of evidence," Paquette said.

    Hatch was acquitted of seven bank, mail and wire fraud charges that related to his charity, Horizon Bound, an outdoors program he planned to open for troubled youth. Prosecutors claimed he spent the money on personal expenses, including tips to a limousine driver, dry cleaning and tens of thousands of dollars worth of improvements to a house he owned.

    "I think the jury saw right through those fraud counts and voted accordingly," MacDonald said. More than five years after winning, Hatch remains reality TV's most famous villain, the man viewers loved to hate. He first captured their attention for shedding his clothes on "Survivor," prompting David Letterman to dub him "the fat naked guy."

    But he made the biggest impression -- and won the show -- by scheming his way to the top. He reveled as squabbles among his fellow contestants thinned their ranks, connived with teammates to stick together then pitted his allies against each other. Early on, he used his success on the show to get more work, including a "Got Milk?" ad and an appearance on "Survivor All-Stars" -- where he was promptly voted off by fellow contestants. He also appeared on TV game shows, including "The Weakest Link." That appearance, made on behalf of Horizon Bound, netted a $10,000 donation to his charity -- money prosecutors said was among the funds misused.

    But Hatch's shrewdness did not serve him well in the legal world. A year ago, prosecutors offered him a deal: plead guilty to two counts of tax evasion and they would recommend less than the maximum 10-year sentence.
    After initially agreeing, Hatch walked away, retaining Minns as his new lawyer and appearing on NBC's "Today" show to claim that CBS was supposed to pay the taxes.

    Prosecutors responded with a grand jury, which indicted Hatch on 10 counts carrying a maximum of 73 years in prison and millions of dollars in fines.
    During the trial, prosecutors called a string of witnesses, including Mark Burnett, executive producer of "Survivor." Burnett testified that Hatch's "Survivor" contract stated he would have to pay taxes on his prize. Minns never asked him about the cheating allegation, and Burnett and CBS declined to comment.

  8. #38
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    He's gonna take a huge hit money wise. Whatever the fines will be, he also has to pay the taxes and penalties on the original $1 million he failed to report. Hmmm, it was something in the $200-300,000 range and it's been 5 years of penalties added to it PLUS the taxes on income from the radio show host he didn't report ($360,000 income) PLUS income from rental properties. PLUS the refund he got when he sent in the phony tax form.

    He deserves more than what he's gonna get. It's quite funny actually, how bad it is going for him, he brought it all on himself. He's a con man that is a complete a$$.

  9. #39
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    What an utter moron. I am sure there are people who are sneaky and don't pay what they should on taxes, but going on national tv and not paying-it really does go beyond stupid.

    And wasn't he suppose to plea and get out of this mess? If I remember.

    He will enjoy jail, though I'm gay, and even if I wasn't gay I would say it

  10. #40
    PWS
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    Quote Originally Posted by jman79 View Post
    He will enjoy jail, though I'm gay, and even if I wasn't gay I would say it
    I dunno....not a lot of safe sex options there....
    Although a lot of IRS cheats wind up at the country club prisons....

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