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Thread: Preparation - or how hard is it to practice lighting a fire?

  1. #41
    FORT Fan catfishbarb's Avatar
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    I don't understand why they don't prepare themselves either. For one thing you don't even need fire for water. There are many plants that can provide water. I just did a search on google and found this in like a minute:

    Sorry for the length of the below, but my point is, if anyone did a little research they'd be so much better off. It would also give them a leg up on there tribe.

    Heavy dew can provide water. Tie rags or tufts of fine grass around your ankles and walk through dew-covered grass before sunrise. As the rags or grass tufts absorb the dew, wring the water into a container. Repeat the process until you have a supply of water or until the dew is gone. Australian natives sometimes mop up as much as a liter an hour this way.

    Bees or ants going into a hole in a tree may point to a water-filled hole. Siphon the water with plastic tubing or scoop it up with an improvised dipper. You can also stuff cloth in the hole to absorb the water and then wring it from the cloth.

    Water sometimes gathers in tree crotches or rock crevices.

    Then they have a diagram that shows how to do this:
    Green bamboo thickets are an excellent source of fresh water. Water from green bamboo is clear and odorless. To get the water, bend a green bamboo stalk, tie it down, and cut off the top (Figure 6-3). The water will drip freely during the night. Old, cracked bamboo may contain water.
    Wherever you find banana or plantain trees, you can get water. Cut down the tree, leaving about a 30-centimeter stump, and scoop out the center of the stump so that the hollow is bowl-shaped. Water from the roots will immediately start to fill the hollow. The first three fillings of water will be bitter, but succeeding fillings will be palatable. The stump (Figure 6-4) will supply water for up to four days. Be sure to cover it to keep out insects.


    Some tropical vines can give you water. Cut a notch in the vine as high as you can reach, then cut the vine off close to the ground. Catch the dropping liquid in a container or in your mouth (Figure 6-5).
    The milk from green (unripe) coconuts is a good thirst quencher. However, the milk from mature coconuts contains an oil that acts as a laxative. Drink in moderation only.

    In the American tropics you may find large trees whose branches support air plants. These air plants may hold a considerable amount of rainwater in their overlapping, thickly growing leaves. Strain the water through a cloth to remove insects and debris.

    You can get water from plants with moist pulpy centers. Cut off a section of the plant and squeeze or smash the pulp so that the moisture runs out. Catch the liquid in a container.

    Plant roots may provide water. Dig or pry the roots out of the ground, cut them into short pieces, and smash the pulp so that the moisture runs out. Catch the liquid in a container.

    Fleshy leaves, stems, or stalks, such as bamboo, contain water. Cut or notch the stalks at the base of a joint to drain out the liquid.

  2. #42
    FORT Fogey Clipse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faulkenham
    Levdrakon, interesting thought, I wonder how many cameramen/crew they have per tribe? I highly doubt they have 6 camermen in each tribe to follow each one.
    I would think it is max 3 crews. Because you never see any crew in the shot and it would be very hard with more than 6 people on the beach. All you need is a cameraman and a boom operator in one crew. Once the tribes go down they will probably go down to two...but thats just a guess.

  3. #43
    FORT Fan Levdrakon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faulkenham
    Levdrakon, interesting thought, I wonder how many cameramen/crew they have per tribe? I highly doubt they have 6 camermen in each tribe to follow each one.
    That's right, they claim these guys are watched 24/7, no exceptions, but it's just not true. All Rich has to do is wait for Lex & Colby to be doing something interesting in one place, Kathy, Jenna and Shii Ann to be doing something interesting somewhere else, and leave Rich unattended for 1.5 seconds.

    "Ooh looky what I did while you guys were gone, I made fire."

  4. #44
    hubba bubba Gher's Avatar
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    Tina said there were plentiful coconuts on the island. Crack one of those open with a machete (provided) and they have their liquid. Supplement with it by catching rain water or get water from plants as described by catfishbarb. It rained there.

    There are parasites in the normal water supply anyway. If you drink tapwater, it's full of parasites. Many people already have immunity having had prior exposure.

    Some people have gotten brain parasites from having their teeth cleaned. It doesn't only happen in the jungle.

    I wonder what will happen if they do not make fire or obtain enough water. Will MB take them to a medical station and put them on a drip and put them back in the game or will he disqualify them if they need this?
    Rob: "I was trying to appeal to their emotions. I was trying to make them see I was affected as well. To be honest with you, those were tears of sorrow, because I think I realized that I wasn’t going to win "

  5. #45
    Oh YEAH!!! Aptly_Named's Avatar
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    Don't worry - I'm sure they'll get fire somehow, or there will be a reward/immunity challenge tailored for that before anyone ends up on an IV drip. But maybe I'm just too optimistic.

  6. #46
    Courtesy and Goodwill Mantenna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gher
    Tina said there were plentiful coconuts on the island. Crack one of those open with a machete (provided) and they have their liquid. Supplement with it by catching rain water or get water from plants as described by catfishbarb. It rained there...I wonder what will happen if they do not make fire or obtain enough water.
    I guess the players never watched Tom Hanks and how he survived in "Cast Away." He didn't even have the machete!

  7. #47
    Oh YEAH!!! Aptly_Named's Avatar
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    My brother said the same thing - they needed Tom Hanks to show them how to start a fire. And I said, yeah, and how to make an alliance with a volleyball.

  8. #48
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    Just as a lense from someone's glasses could be used for starting a fire, any mineral or rock fragment on the beach that is thin and clear enough to let light pass thru would do the trick. Quartz or possibly volcanic glass if the islands have formed from volcanoes. Or possibility of calcite from coral reef fragments.
    Also, one of the two Rob's who returned with the immunity tree mail, it came with a dive mask didn't it, cause he had it on his head?! Could have used the lense from it, either tilt it a bit to refract the sunlight or add a thin layer of water to the inside of the mask lens to get the refraction effect needed!!

    Yeah, really surprised at the lack of brains displayed by these 'all stars' so far.

  9. #49
    FORT Fogey Miss_Griss's Avatar
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    Just a comment/question about the flint and steel method of fire starting.

    Doesn't there have to be something to catch the spark besides the tinder? I took some outdoor survival courses years ago, and we carried little pieces of charred cotton to catch the spark (it had to be 100% cotton, or it wouldn't work). Regular tinder...no matter how dry...won't light from a spark as far as I know.

    We had to make little nests of tinder and then put a small piece of the charred cotton in the middle to catch the spark. The spark would catch and then we gently blew on it while folding the tinder around the smoldering cotton.

    Several people have mentioned using flint and steel kits. Do the kits have something that they use to catch the spark? Just curious.
    Seeking form amidst the void.

    But if that's not possible, gimme a Margarita...shaken, not stirred...and hold the salt, please.

  10. #50
    Princess
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    Several people have mentioned using flint and steel kits. Do the kits have something that they use to catch the spark?
    Yes, tinder . I don't have my dictionary here but if someone has a Swedish-English one, the word you are looking to translate is "fnöske". I know I looked it up long time ago, and I think the English word is something like "XXX-tinder".

    It is light brown, very soft and thin, and looks much like a piece of leather, but is made from a particular mushroom which has been cooked, dried, and flattened. It won't really burn with a flame but rather glow, so you use it just like you described how you used the charred cotton, MG.

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