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Thread: Donald Sterling remarks

  1. #41
    FORT Fogey Punkin's Avatar
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is an African-American civil rights organization in the United States, formed in 1909.[3] Its mission is "to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination".[4] Its name, retained in accordance with tradition, uses the once common term colored people
    .

    National Association for the Advancement of Colored People - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "A once common term" refers to the fact that we've moved on to a term that is more respectful and accurate in it's description. We used to refer to the American Indian as the "red man", but we don't anymore. Language evolves. Most of us evolve with it.
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    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    Or, at least we hope so.
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  3. #43
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    My point was that it's still used. I don't use it but when I was writing it, it could have just popped in my head bc I had heard it about 30 times during the reports. If they evolved, why still use it? That really doesn't make sense

  4. #44
    FORT Fogey libgirl2's Avatar
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    I worked with an elderly man (WWII vet) who used the word "colored". He was also the beloved security guard at the library I worked at who had countless African American children love the guy. He'd do magic tricks for them, befriend them and their parents, in turn the families made gifts for him, took him out to eat etc... he used that word, not because of racism, but because that was the word he grew up hearing and he never meant it as a term of disrespect. Yes, it made me wince when I heard him say it....
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    FORT Fogey MsDiva2007's Avatar
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    Quote Originally Posted by libgirl2 View Post
    I worked with an elderly man (WWII vet) who used the word "colored". He was also the beloved security guard at the library I worked at who had countless African American children love the guy. He'd do magic tricks for them, befriend them and their parents, in turn the families made gifts for him, took him out to eat etc... he used that word, not because of racism, but because that was the word he grew up hearing and he never meant it as a term of disrespect. Yes, it made me wince when I heard him say it....
    I have not heard anyone use the term in decades. It brings back sadness to me because I can remember as a kid we used to travel every summer from California to Maryland by car to stay with the grandparents for the summer. My mom used to have to fry chicken and bring other foods because lots of restaurants had signs stating they did not serve " colored people" so we had to utilize rest stops and eat their depending on where we stopped at. I will never forget stopping for gas and the attendant asked my dad " what do you want boy?"
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  6. #46
    FORT Fogey Miss Scarlet's Avatar
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    I don't think the term is a racial slur at all. Just very outdated. My mother used to use it & there wasn't a racist or bigoted bone in her body. I did have a little sit down talk with her about it one time, explaining that it's no longer PC & might offend someone. She was mortified but tried to drop it from her vocabulary.
    I also cringed a bit when I heard Sterling say it. You'd think a person who deals with people of many races in a place like Major League Sports would have gotten past that years ago.

    I saw that Barbara Walters interview with Sterling's whatever-she-is woman. Talk about cringing. She's completely unaware of what or who she is. I could only take it for a short time & had to change the channel. I hope to never see her face again either.
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  7. #47
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    Quote Originally Posted by Miss Scarlet View Post
    I don't think the term is a racial slur at all. Just very outdated. My mother used to use it & there wasn't a racist or bigoted bone in her body. I did have a little sit down talk with her about it one time, explaining that it's no longer PC & might offend someone. She was mortified but tried to drop it from her vocabulary.
    I also cringed a bit when I heard Sterling say it. You'd think a person who deals with people of many races in a place like Major League Sports would have gotten past that years ago.

    I saw that Barbara Walters interview with Sterling's whatever-she-is woman. Talk about cringing. She's completely unaware of what or who she is. I could only take it for a short time & had to change the channel. I hope to never see her face again either.
    I think Barbara doesn't realize how people view her anymore. I find her to be slightly off sometimes.
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  8. #48
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    Quote Originally Posted by MsDiva2007 View Post
    I think Barbara doesn't realize how people view her anymore. I find her to be slightly off sometimes.
    Barbara is bad enough, but I was talking about that other woman.
    Maybe that's why I turned it off. Two unaware women in the same room was too much to bear.
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  9. #49
    Bloomin' FoRT Fanatic! ness's Avatar
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    Quote Originally Posted by Giggity22 View Post
    My point was that it's still used. I don't use it but when I was writing it, it could have just popped in my head bc I had heard it about 30 times during the reports. If they evolved, why still use it? That really doesn't make sense
    Frankly, I do not know the reasoning behind WHY the NAACP still uses the word "colored" in its title (or has not changed its title completely) and frankly, I do not care. I do not and have never spoken for that organization in any capacity whatsoever, and will not attempt to do so now.

    What DOES make sense to ME is that, again:

    With all due respect, NOBODY breathing on this earth colored us. Also, I, personally, haven't heard/had that term used in reference to myself or others of my heritage that I can recall right now --- and yes, I'm African American --- in at LEAST the last 45 (or a few MORE, possibly) years.

    To be even MORE specific and clear on the matter:

    Frankly, I (and quite a few other people, as well, truth be told) equate the use of the word "colored" with the use of the n-word. I do not like either word/term and would NOT and DO not tolerate the use of either by any one of ANY race with my knowledge and/or in my presence.

    When/if an offense of this nature comes up, I respectfully address it.

    For me, the bottom line here is that IMHO, Donald Sterling is a certified, patented, dyed-in-the-wool racist, and, far as I'm concerned, whatever he gets as far as payback goes, he's got coming.

    JMHO.
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  10. #50
    2 heads are better than 1 MrMet's Avatar
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    Re: Donald Sterling remarks

    Quote Originally Posted by ness View Post
    Frankly, I do not know the reasoning behind WHY the NAACP still uses the word "colored" in its title (or has not changed its title completely) and frankly, I do not care. I do not and have never spoken for that organization in any capacity whatsoever, and will not attempt to do so now.

    What DOES make sense to ME is that, again:

    With all due respect, NOBODY breathing on this earth colored us. Also, I, personally, haven't heard/had that term used in reference to myself or others of my heritage that I can recall right now --- and yes, I'm African American --- in at LEAST the last 45 (or a few MORE, possibly) years.

    To be even MORE specific and clear on the matter:

    Frankly, I (and quite a few other people, as well, truth be told) equate the use of the word "colored" with the use of the n-word. I do not like either word/term and would NOT and DO not tolerate the use of either by any one of ANY race with my knowledge and/or in my presence.

    When/if an offense of this nature comes up, I respectfully address it.

    For me, the bottom line here is that IMHO, Donald Sterling is a certified, patented, dyed-in-the-wool racist, and, far as I'm concerned, whatever he gets as far as payback goes, he's got coming.

    JMHO.
    I think one of the only good things to come out of this Sterling mess is that it's given us a reason to have an honest discussion about race rather than the semantics that are normally fought. These days, most race discussions center around who is allowed to use the n word, what "colored" means to people, etc. while I don't want to diminish the emotions evoked by these words, part of me has to ask who cares? If "colored" is highly offensive to you, but not the person who spoke it, doesn't intent matter at all? With these sorts of superficial fights there's a lot of reason for people to feel emotion, especially outrage, and for wedges to be driven. But it doesn't mean much.

    On the other hand, Sterlings comments illustrate that there are still people who believe and will advocate that races not mix. They'll do it with hypocrisy and ignorance, but they do it. That's a bigger concern to me. Of course, the good news to come from this is that people who believe such things and a small minority who know their views are so unacceptable to the masses that virtually no one has come forward to defend him. The NBA ( and other pro sports leagues) will accept men who beat women, sexually assault them, kill dogs, and in some cases are associated with murders. For those crimes, they shake their heads, suspend, fine, and then welcome back. With overt racism, we've shown there is no tolerance. Players were willing to walk. The league banned for life. Pro sports has spoken on their values, and we don't tolerate racism. That's some progress. For many reasons, I think this ugly event has been one of the most important progressions we've made on race recently.

    Last note, I'm disappointed that anyone did an interview with the mistress, but I'm glad it wasn't so publicized that the entire country tuned in. I hope that's a reflection of the sentiment towards her, and that fame will not be coming her way. It's very likely that she committed a crime taping him. While some good came from what she did, I think that if it's proven she taped him without his knowledge, she should be treated like a criminal and not heralded in infamy as we have so many other mistresses.

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