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Thread: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

  1. #61
    FORT Fanatic Adult Beverage's Avatar
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    What a nice, big, glowing write-up before sentencing. Except for the marijuana and indictment on state charges.

  2. #62
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    Quote Originally Posted by Adult Beverage;2595985;
    What a nice, big, glowing write-up before sentencing. Except for the marijuana and indictment on state charges.
    Okie dokie. So, I do realize we aren't in Current Events here, but I do still have to wonder, is there a single thing this guy can do to redeem himself, at all? Or is he such a lost cause, as a human being, that no matter what he does, he's so totally unworthy of oxygen intake that we may as well just commit him to capital punishment now?

    I'm not saying that this article is the be-all and end-all, but I'm sort of curious, considering other crimes committed in this country, not to mention in his own league, what's the guy got to do to be cut any break at all? He hasn't paid anyone (as far as I know) for the death of human beings (see Ray Lewis) nor has he actually been convicted of the death of a human being (see Rae Carruth), and yet, somehow, he seems to be held to some higher standard than are the previously mentioned men. Why is that?

    Is is that dogs, for some reason, are of more value or considred more vunerable than unborn humans? Is it that the man himself seems less worthy of empathy? What is it that makes us, as a whole, be able to get behind the outrage against the mistreatment of dogs, when we don't seem to be able to muster the same outrage against the mistreatment of other humans?

    I'm serious, and not being just argumentative. It's one of the things that fascinates me, ad nauseum, about the difference between those that do harm to 'animals' and those that do harm to humans.
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  3. #63
    FORT Fanatic Adult Beverage's Avatar
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    I'm not saying that this article is the be-all and end-all, but I'm sort of curious, considering other crimes committed in this country, not to mention in his own league, what's the guy got to do to be cut any break at all? He hasn't paid anyone (as far as I know) for the death of human beings (see Ray Lewis) nor has he actually been convicted of the death of a human being (see Rae Carruth), and yet, somehow, he seems to be held to some higher standard than are the previously mentioned men. Why is that?
    You never asked about them. I'm certainly not holding Vick to a higher standard. I believe Rae Carruth is still serving time for having his pregnant girl killed. Ray Lewis deserves the same. Anyone who did what they did rightfully deserve more than vick will get. That's not the issue. It still doesn't lessen what Vick did.

  4. #64
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    Arbitrator rules Falcons can recoup nearly $20 million in bonus money paid to Vick - NFL - Yahoo! Sports

    Arbitrator rules Falcons can recoup nearly $20 million in bonus money paid to Vick
    By PAUL NEWBERRY, AP Sports Writer
    October 9, 2007

    ATLANTA (AP) -- Michael Vick has taken another hit -- and this one could cost him nearly $20 million.

    Already facing prison time, the disgraced quarterback lost the first round in his financial battle with the Atlanta Falcons when an arbitrator ruled Tuesday that Vick should repay much of the bonus money he got while secretly bankrolling a gruesome dogfighting ring.

    The case is far from over. The players' union said it will appeal the ruling by Stephen B. Burbank, a University of Pennsylvania law professor and special master who oversaw last week's arbitration hearing in Philadelphia.

    The Falcons argued that Vick, who pleaded guilty to federal charges for his role in the long-running operation, knew he was in violation of the contract when he signed a 10-year, $130 million deal in December 2004.

    The team said he used proceeds from the contract to fund his illicit activities and sought the repayment of $19,970,000 in bonuses he was paid over the last three years.

    Any money the Falcons recover from Vick would be credited to its future salary cap, a huge step in recovering from the loss of the team's franchise player. Atlanta (1-4) is off to a dismal start with Joey Harrington at quarterback.

    "We are certainly pleased with today's ruling," the Falcons said in a statement. "It is the first step in a process that our club has undertaken in an attempt to recoup significant salary cap space that will allow us to continue to build our football team today and in future years."

    In a highly technical, nine-page ruling, Burbank said the Falcons were entitled to $3.75 million of the $7.5 million bonus that Vick was paid after signing the deal in 2004, $13.5 million of the $22.5 million in roster, reporting and playing bonuses he was paid in 2005 and 2006, and $2.72 million of the $7 million roster, reporting and playing bonus that he received this year.

    Burbank took a different tact than his ruling last year in a bonus dispute involving former Denver Broncos receiver Ashley Lelie.

    In that case, the arbitrator ordered the Broncos to repay $220,000 to Lelie, who reportedly had to give up about $1 million in fines, lost bonuses and a prorated portion of his signing bonus to get out of the final year of his Denver contract after a dispute over playing time.

    "We have reviewed the decision handed down by Special Master Stephen Burbank and believe it is incorrect," the NFLPA said in a statement. "We will now appeal his ruling."

    The case goes to U.S. District Court Judge David Doty in Minneapolis, who still has jurisdiction over the antitrust suit filed by players following the 1987 strike.

    Giving teams more financial leeway than he did in the Lelie case, Burbank said Falcons were entitled to recover bonuses for future services that Vick won't be able to earn because of his dogfighting admission. He was suspended indefinitely without pay by the NFL, in addition to losing millions in lucrative endorsement deals.

    If upheld, the decision would be a further strain on Vick's finances.

    He already has been sued by an Indiana bank that claims he failed to repay at least $2 million in loans for a car rental business, and by a Canadian bank that claims he owes more than $2.3 million for real estate investments.

    Of course, Vick has more troubling issues to deal with than cash-flow problems. He'll be sentenced Dec. 10 in the federal dogfighting case and is expected to get at least a year in prison. He's also facing felony dogfighting charges in Virginia, which carry possible sentences of up to five years each.

    In addition, Vick tested positive for marijuana last month, drawing the ire of the judge who will be sentencing him in December. U.S. District Judge Henry Hudson ordered Vick confined to his Virginia home between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. with electronic monitoring. He also must submit to random drug testing.

    Vick's stunning downfall began in late April when authorities conducting a drug investigation of Vick's cousin raided property that Vick owns in Surry County, Va. Officers seized dozens of dogs, most of them pit bulls, and equipment associated with dogfighting.

    Vick initially denied any knowledge of the enterprise, then pledged after he was charged that he would fight to clear his name.

    After his three co-defendants pleaded guilty, Vick followed suit in late August and admitted to bankrolling the enterprise and participating in the killing of eight dogs that performed poorly. In his only public comment since the admission, Vick took responsibility for his actions and asked for forgiveness.

    "I offer my deepest apologies to everybody out there in the world who was affected by this whole situation," he said, "and if I'm more disappointed with myself than anything it's because of all the young people, young kids that I let down, who look at Michael Vick as a role model."

  5. #65
    FORT Fanatic Adult Beverage's Avatar
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    After he gets out of jail he could be out of work, out of money, out of luck.

    Is it immaturity, poor decision making, or being self-destructive?

  6. #66
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    I hope he serves every second of the 23 months. I only wish he wouldn't be receiving the royal treatment his football status will afford him. He needs to suffer the same anguish he heaped upon the dogs.

    NFL star Michael Vick sentenced to 23 months in prison
    Last Updated: Monday, December 10, 2007 | 12:49 PM ET
    CBC Sports



    Michael Vick was sentenced Monday in Richmond, Va., to 23 months in prison for his role in a dogfighting conspiracy.

    The suspended NFL star had faced up to five years in prison when he was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Henry E. Hudson. However, it was thought Vick was more likely to receive 12 to 18 months.

    Dressed in a black and white striped prison suit, Vick, 27, apologized to the court and his family.

    Hudson responded, "You need to apologize to the millions of young people who looked up to you."

    "Yes, sir," said Vick.

    The Atlanta Falcons quarterback acknowledged he used "poor judgment" and added, "I'm willing to deal with the consequences and accept responsibility for my actions."

    Before the hearing started, Vick's brother, Marcus Vick, sat with his right arm around their mother, comforting her as she buried her head in her hands and wept.

    Vick pleaded guilty in August, admitting he bankrolled the Bad News Kennels dogfighting operation and helped kill six to eight dogs.

    In his plea agreement, he admitted bankrolling the dogfighting ring on his six-hectare property in rural southeastern Virginia, and helping execute under performing pit bulls by drowning, hanging and other means. Vick also admitted providing money for bets on the fights but said he never shared in any winnings.

    Vick's plea came after Quoins Phillips of Atlanta, Parnell Peace of Virginia Beach, Va., and Tony Taylor of Hampton, Va., pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against Vick, who hails from Newport News, Va.

    Phillips was sentenced to 21 months while Peace got 18 months. Taylor will be sentenced on Friday. The three men and Vick still face state charges in Virginia, with Vick scheduled for an April 2 trial date.

    Vick publicly apologized for his role in the dogfighting operation and turned himself in Nov. 19 to voluntarily begin serving his federal prison term early. He was being held in a state jail in Warsaw, Va.

    The case began in April when a drug investigation of a Vick relative led authorities to the Surry County property, where they found dozens of pit bulls some of them injured and an assortment of dogfighting paraphernalia.

    Vick, a three-time Pro Bowler who set an NFL record for quarterbacks by rushing for 1,039 yards last season, signed a 10-year, $130-million US contract extension with the Falcons on Dec. 23, 2004.

    Falcons owner Arthur Blank called Vick's sentencing "another step in his legal journey."

    "This is a difficult day for Michael's family and for a lot of us, including many of our players and fans who have been emotionally invested in Michael over the years," Blank said Monday.

    "We sincerely hope that Michael will use this time to continue to focus his efforts on making positive changes in his life, and we wish him well in that regard."

    By 8 a.m. ET Monday two hours before Vick's sentencing was due to take place about 50 people were in line outside the courthouse waiting for the doors to open. About two dozen animal rights activists stood across the street holding posters showing injured pit bulls and the messages, "Report Dogfighters" and "Dogs Deserve Justice."

    "We want to make sure the focus on the animals in this case isn't lost," said Dan Shannon, spokesman for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.
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  7. #67
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    Quote Originally Posted by Adult Beverage;2606522;
    After he gets out of jail he could be out of work, out of money, out of luck.

    Is it immaturity, poor decision making, or being self-destructive?
    i am sure he will be ok after he gets out and we know he is not going to the jail jail where he will become someone's B......

  8. #68
    FORT Fogey canadian_angel's Avatar
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    While I'm glad he was sentenced I wish it'd have been more. He deserves it.

  9. #69
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    Great News for Rescued Dogs from Vick's Case

    Attachment 23201

    Vick dogs new life
    baltimoresun.com - Mutts: The Good Newz: A loving home for Vick dog

    This video is long, but worth watching.
    From fighters to friends, Vick's pit bulls learn new life - CNN.com
    Last edited by misskitty; 05-12-2008 at 06:22 PM.
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  10. #70
    Got wings 9/19/2012 buglover's Avatar
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    Re: Federal grand jury indicts Vick in dogfighting case

    I hope he's never allowed to have dogs again.
    Yup, with donuts!!

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