+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 53

Thread: Miscellaneous Sports News

  1. #41
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    Damn....he missed his chance to be with me!

    Link Here

    It's love - love for Andy Roddick and Brooklyn Decker – they're engaged!

    The tennis star is officially off the market after popping the question to Decker last Tuesday, sources, including Decker's rep, confirm to PEOPLE.

    The pair, who have been dating since 2007, first met after Roddick, 25, asked his agent to track down a number for Decker, 20, a model who has appeared in the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition.

    No word yet on a wedding date.
    Here she is:



    and at work:
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  2. #42
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    8,164

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    Geez, this is just the year of the tennis player and the model weddings! First Mardy Fish gets engaged to his Deal or No Deal suitcase girl, and now Andy. The tennis off-season is so short for fitting in all these weddings - maybe they'll just have a double wedding.

  3. #43
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    Link Here

    NEW YORK (April 28) - Roger Clemens had a decade-long relationship with country star Mindy McCready that began when she was a 15-year-old aspiring singer and the pitcher was a Boston Red Sox ace, the Daily News reported.

    Clemens' lawyer, Rusty Hardin, confirmed a long-term relationship but told the newspaper it was not sexual.

    "Mindy McCready is a longtime family friend of Roger Clemens and the Clemens family," Hardin said in a statement Monday. "At no time did Roger engage in any kind of inappropriate or improper relationship with her. It is unfortunate that the Daily News has chosen to report anonymous allegations that are completely unfounded, have no basis in fact, and have nothing to do with Roger's baseball career or the issue of steroid use in baseball."

    The story, which appeared on the newspaper's Web site Sunday night and in editions Monday, quoted several people who asked not to be identified because of the sensitivity of the situation.

    McCready's lawyer, Lee Ofman, said he did not have any comment on the Daily News story.

    Clemens was 28 and a married father of two when he first met McCready, the newspaper reported.

    The story could undermine Clemens' reputation, which is central to the defamation suit the former pitcher has filed against former personal trainer Brian McNamee. McNamee contends Clemens used performance-enhancing substances during his major league career.

    "If true, it's just another example of Roger's pervasive prevarications which will be at the core of any defamation case," said McNamee's attorney, Richard Emery, in an e-mail to The Associated Press.

    The newspaper said Clemens sent cash to McCready to help her with legal issues and reached out to her when she was in jail last year in Tennessee.

    The 32-year-old McCready was sentenced last September for violating probation from a 2004 drug arrest and was released from jail last Dec. 30. The violation occurred in July when McCready was accused of scuffling with her mother and resisting arrest at her mother's home in Fort Myers, Fla. She still must serve two years' probation.
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  4. #44
    Over and Out! Bunny555's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,368

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    Roger Clemens had a decade-long relationship with country star Mindy McCready that began when she was a 15-year-old aspiring singer and the pitcher was a Boston Red Sox ace, the Daily News reported.
    As Jay Leno said "He was playing in the minors"
    CYA

  5. #45
    That's all folks! Unklescott's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Dublin, OH
    Posts
    26,558

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    I read this in today's paper and was in awe of these girls. Talk about good sportsmanship. This was way too cool.

    'Unbelievable' sportsmanship in softball game - Other sports - MSNBC.com
    Members of opposing college softball team carry injured hitter around bases to ensure her first-ever home run.
    TODAY’s Ann Curry reports.

    NBCSports.com
    updated 4:42 p.m. ET, Wed., April. 30, 2008

    PORTLAND, Ore. - With two runners on base and a strike against her, Sara Tucholsky of Western Oregon University uncorked her best swing and did something she had never done, in high school or college. Her first home run cleared the center-field fence.

    But it appeared to be the shortest of dreams come true when she missed first base, started back to tag it and collapsed with a knee injury.

    She crawled back to first but could do no more. The first-base coach said she would be called out if her teammates tried to help her. Or, the umpire said, a pinch runner could be called in, and the homer would count as a single.
    Story continues below ↓advertisement

    Then, members of the Central Washington University softball team stunned spectators by carrying Tucholsky around the bases Saturday so the three-run homer would count — an act that contributed to their own elimination from the playoffs.

    Central Washington first baseman Mallory Holtman, the career home run leader in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference, asked the umpire if she and her teammates could help Tucholsky.

    The umpire said there was no rule against it.

    So Holtman and shortstop Liz Wallace put their arms under Tucholsky’s legs, and she put her arms over their shoulders. The three headed around the base paths, stopping to let Tucholsky touch each base with her good leg.

    “The only thing I remember is that Mallory asked me which leg was the one that hurt,” Tucholsky said. “I told her it was my right leg and she said, ‘OK, we’re going to drop you down gently and you need to touch it with your left leg,’ and I said ‘OK, thank you very much.”’

    “She said, ‘You deserve it, you hit it over the fence,’ and we all kind of just laughed.”

    “We started laughing when we touched second base,” Holtman said. “I said, ’I wonder what this must look like to other people.”’

    “We didn’t know that she was a senior or that this was her first home run,” Wallace said Wednesday. “That makes the story more touching than it was. We just wanted to help her.”

    Holtman said she and Wallace weren’t thinking about the playoff spot, and didn’t consider the gesture something others wouldn’t do.

    As for Tucholsky, the 5-foot-2 right fielder was focused on her pain.

    “I really didn’t say too much. I was trying to breathe,” she told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Wednesday.

    “I didn’t realize what was going on until I had time to sit down and let the pain relax a little bit,” she said. “Then I realized the extent of what I actually did.”

    “I hope I would do the same for her in the same situation,” Tucholsky added.

    As the trio reached home plate, Tucholsky said, the entire Western Oregon team was in tears.

    Central Washington coach Gary Frederick, a 14-year coaching veteran, called the act of sportsmanship “unbelievable.”

    For Western Oregon coach Pam Knox, the gesture resolved the dilemma Tucholsky’s injury presented.

    “She was going to kill me if we sub and take (the home run) away. But at the same time I was concerned for her. I didn’t know what to do,” Knox said.

    Tucholsky’s injury is a possible torn ligament that will sideline her for the rest of the season, and she plans to graduate in the spring with a degree in business. Her home run sent Western Oregon to a 4-2 victory, ending Central Washington’s chances of winning the conference and advancing to the playoffs.

    “In the end, it is not about winning and losing so much,” Holtman said. “It was about this girl. She hit it over the fence and was in pain, and she deserved a home run.”

  6. #46
    Scrappy Spartan Broadway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    18,963

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    Unk.... I saw the video for that during the lunch news. Amazing... simply amazing. to those girls!
    Never let the things you want make you forget about the things you have.

  7. #47
    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,522

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    I love stories like this, Unk. It's nice to hear about the good kids for a change.
    Getting lost will help you find yourself.

  8. #48
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Enchanted by a beautiful Soprano
    Posts
    3,163

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    That's nothing compared to the Buckeyes and the points that they graciously allowed the Florida Gators and the LSU Tigers to score in the National Championship

    More seriously, this story reminds me of Lutz Long and Jesse Owens at the 1936 Olympics.
    "The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination."
    --Marion Zimmer Bradley

  9. #49
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    Fantastic story Unk...those girls parents must be so proud of them!
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  10. #50
    That's all folks! Unklescott's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Dublin, OH
    Posts
    26,558

    Re: Miscellaneous Sports News

    Buzzie was a great GM who helped build a dynasty with the Dodgers. RIP Buzzie.
    Former Dodgers GM Buzzie Bavasi dies in San Diego at 93 - Yahoo! News
    Former Dodgers GM Buzzie Bavasi dies in San Diego at 93
    By KEN PETERS, AP Sports Writer Fri May 2, 3:04 AM ET

    LOS ANGELES - Buzzie Bavasi, who built Dodgers teams that won four World Series titles in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, died Thursday at his home in the La Jolla area of San Diego. He was 93.

    His death was announced by the Seattle Mariners, whose general manager is Bill Bavasi, a son of the former Dodgers GM.

    "Buzzie was one of the game's greatest front office executives during a period that spanned parts of six different decades," baseball commissioner Bud Selig said. "He loved the game, and he loved talking about it."

    Emil Joseph Bavasi — nicknamed Buzzie by his family for the way he buzzed around as a kid — helped put together Dodgers teams that included future Hall of Famers Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale.

    As an executive in the Dodgers' minor league system, he helped Robinson, Campanella and Don Newcombe through their often difficult integration into professional baseball. Robinson went on to break the major league color barrier.

    "I don't know where Roy Campanella and I would have been if Buzzie didn't give us a chance at Nashua (N.H.) in 1946," said Newcombe, now the Dodgers' community relations director. "I didn't always do the right thing as a player, but Buzzie always gave me a chance to straighten myself out and get back on track."

    Bavasi later was part owner and president of the San Diego Padres, then became executive vice president of the California Angels.

    He spent 44 years working in baseball, including 34 in the major leagues. He began as a traveling secretary and publicity director for the Dodgers in Brooklyn in 1939.

    After serving in various posts for the team, he was promoted to GM — replacing the famed Branch Rickey — before the 1951 season.

    During his tenure as GM from 1951-68, first in Brooklyn and then Los Angeles, the Dodgers won eight National League pennants. They won their only World Series in Brooklyn in 1955. After the move West, the Dodgers won the World Series in 1959, 1963 and 1965 with Bavasi as GM.

    Former manager and coach Don Zimmer said Bavasi "was like a father to me, from the time I was 19 years old. All my life, really. I can't describe how much he meant to me."

    Bavasi was selected major league executive of the year in 1959. He was with the expansion Padres from 1969-77 and the Angels from 1978-84.

    After serving three years as an infantry machine gunner and earning a bronze star during World War II, he ran the Dodgers' farm club in Nashua, N.H., starting in 1946.

    Though tucked away in a small town in the New England League, Bavasi immediately found himself at the center of the Dodgers' effort to integrate the major leagues.

    Former Negro Leagues players Newcombe and Campanella were signed and sent to the team in 1946, and Bavasi was assigned to handle their potentially tough arrival and development.

    There were some ugly incidents — Campanella said a catcher for the Lynn Red Sox threw dirt in his face and that the team used racial slurs with him and Newcombe.

    But Bavasi and the two players handled the circumstances so well that all three joined the big league team in a few years.

    Bavasi's prime years with the Dodgers were before free agency, when GMs had far more power in dealing with players, who often didn't even have agents.

    "We operated by the Golden Rule," Bavasi reportedly once said. "He who has the gold rules."

    After an MVP season in 1962 when he stole a then-league-record 104 bases, Maury Wills came to Bavasi seeking a special contract incentive.

    "Maury asked if there was any way he could get $5,000 more, and suggested if he made the All-Star team, I would give him a $5,000 bonus," Bavasi told MLB.com last year. "I thought about it for a second and said, 'That's a good idea, Maury. But if you don't make the All-Star team, I'll take $5,000 back.' Maury signed for $80,000."

    Wills well remembers that meeting.

    "I thought I was going to get a big raise, but after 10 minutes in Buzzie's office, I was happy I was still on the team," Wills said.

    In his most famous standoff as an executive, Koufax and Drysdale began a joint holdout on Feb. 28, 1966, seeking an unprecedented $1.05 million contract to be divided equally. They escalated their threat of retirement March 17, signing moving contracts, but Bavasi waited them out and they ended their holdout March 30, with Koufax signing for $130,000 and Drysdale for $105,000.

    After a remarkable run with the Dodgers, Bavasi became the first president of the San Diego Padres in 1969 for owner C. Arnholt Smith.

    "We had the four things necessary to a successful bid for a franchise," Bavasi said in the early 1970s. "We had a responsible (owner), population, climate and a new stadium."

    Predictably the expansion Padres were no Dodgers, finishing in last place in their first three seasons. He stayed with the team until 1977.

    Bavasi then headed to the California Angels, where he was hired as GM in 1978 and sent a pair of teams to the playoffs before he retired in 1984.

    He faced criticism in Anaheim for not re-signing free agent Nolan Ryan after the 1979 season when the pitcher had gone 16-14.

    "We'll just have to find a couple of 8-7 pitchers to replace him," Bavasi said at the time.

    Years later, after the ageless Ryan had thrown his sixth no-hitter in 1990, Bavasi sent him a message that read: "Nolan, some time ago I made it public that I made a mistake. You don't have to rub it in."

    Former Angels GM Mike Port said Bavasi had a remarkable baseball mind.

    "Eight National League pennants, four World Series titles, two American League championship series titles, more than two dozen of his former players who managed at the major league level — that just scratches the surface of Buzzie's accomplishments in the game," Port said.

    "He could be your best friend or your best motivator. It was a privilege to have been mentored by him and worked for him."

    Bavasi's survivors include his wife of 68 years, Evit; sons Peter, a former GM for the Padres and Toronto Blue Jays; Chris, Bob and Bill; nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

    Funeral arrangements will be private. The family asked that, in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Baseball Assistance Team or Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.