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Thread: Hockey , Til the next Season - whenever that is ...

  1. #521
    It ain't easy being green Wayner's Avatar
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    Mr D, I had no idea that you lived in the Denver area. DU hockey is wonderful. But alas, it's still not the NHL. I live in Loveland, and while we have the CHL's Colorado Eagles who are playing really well, it's still not the same. I want my Sharks back!!!

    Side note; my kids (ages 3 and 2) are starting to want to have more say in their wardrobes. Sunday my wife dressed our two-year-old daughter for church; she wore a red sweater with a red/black/white tartan skirt, and black leather shoes. My daughter insisted on adding to the emsemble - she wore a black "Old Time Hockey" San Jose Sharks cap - backwards. I've never been so proud.

  2. #522
    Can They Do It?? mrdobolina's Avatar
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    How can the Sharks sell an "old time hockey" cap??? Oh wait....they're original 6 with Atlanta, Phoenix, Dallas, Carolina and LA, right??
    "You don't own a TV?!? What's all your furniture pointed at?" Joey Tribianni

    It's not who you are underneath, but what you do that defines you.

  3. #523
    Cy Young 2010 Mariner's Avatar
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    I just heard on KJR our local sports radio station that the NHL supposedly just made their final cap offer of 42 1/2 million 5 minutes ago.

  4. #524
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    At least you've heard something. Our local stations don't even talk of hockey anymore. However, they keep airing old games. As if anybody wants to watch what they've already seen????

    Usually, when football is over, its hockey time. Going through hockey withdrawl.

    Sadly, with the lock-out, the only people to suffer are the fans. TISK TISK!!!

  5. #525
    Hockey is life! EvaLaruefan's Avatar
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    it is the fans that are suffering. This whole talk thing is getting old. I wish they would just announce the season was over already!

  6. #526
    eny
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    The latest final offer


    NHL gives union final offer

    Canadian Press

    2/15/2005

    NEW YORK (CP) - It's white knuckle time for the NHL Players' Association.



    The NHL has delivered an ultimatum: take it or leave it by 11 a.m. EST Wednesday.
    The league bumped its ''final offer'' Tuesday to a $42.5-million US team-by-team salary cap, up from the $40 million first rejected by the union Monday night.

    ''This offer is not an invitation to begin negotiations - it's too late for that,'' NHL commissioner Gary Bettman wrote in a letter to NHLPA executive director Bob Goodenow. ''This is our last effort to make a deal that's fair to the players and one that the clubs (hopefully) can afford.

    ''We have no more flexibility and there is no time for further negotiation.''

    That put the ball in the association's court, with the clock ticking down to 1 p.m. EST Wednesday when Bettman is expected to cancel the season barring an agreement.

    ''Hopefully, the press conference will not be necessary,'' Bettman wrote.

    The NHLPA's last offer involved a $52-million cap, still nearly $10 million off the league's final offer. Several industry sources suggested some disappointment in the league's final figure, believing $45 million would have definitely got the deal done.

    Offers from both sides during the last two days included a 24-per-cent salary rollback on all existing player contracts.

    The $42.5-million salary cap would be the figure for all six years of the new collective bargaining agreement in the league's new offer. The NHL says the total player compensation would be $44.7 million per team, adding $2.2 million in benefits such as medical and dental.

    As one might expect, the big-spending clubs would be the most affected if this deal is accepted. Counting the rollback of 24 per cent, four teams are currently over the $42.5-million figure and that's before signing any free agents. Detroit ($43.38 million), New Jersey ($46.32 million), Philadelphia ($50 million) and Toronto ($46.6 million) would be over. Dallas ($40.77 million) and Colorado ($40.27 million) would be on the bubble without signing anyone else.

    The average team payroll last season, adding the salary rollback, would have been $33.95 million.

    So, the deal would definitely have a salary drag on the big spenders, but yet not to the point where owners would get ''cost certainty'' because the league dropped its long-standing demand of a fixed link between player costs and revenues.

    ''I know, as do you, that the `deal' we can make will only get worse for the players if we cancel the season - whatever damage we have suffered to date will pale in comparison to the damage from a cancelled season and we will certainly not be able to afford what is presently on the table,'' Bettman wrote in a familiar refrain used in recent weeks - basically a threat.

    ''Accordingly, I am making one final effort to reach out to make a deal that will let us play this season.''

    There was no immediate public response from the association. Tuesday night was likely be a long one for the NHLPA in Toronto, with Goodenow strategizing alongside senior director Ted Saskin, outside counsel John McCambridge, president Trevor Linden and other executive committee players.

    Sources indicated a full players' vote would likely not be needed because the leadership has a good feel for its membership. And in the end, despite Bettman's warning, the association could very well come back with its own offer.

    The league counter-offer came around supper time on a tense day where facts were few but opinions were plentiful.

    It appeared the door leading to a possible solution had finally started to open following Monday night's revelation that the NHLPA had changed direction at the final turn and offered to play under a $52-million salary cap.

    The league, meanwhile, moved by proposing a $40-million salary cap with no ''linkage'' to revenue.
    Each side rejected the other's offer but a major buzz was created in the hockey world. The last-minute change in negotiating strategy represents a quantum leap for both sides. The players have insisted a salary cap was a non-starter, while the league has built its case around so-called cost certainty - linking player costs to revenue.

    ''The buzzwords are off the table now, it's a business discussion now not a philosophical argument and that's good,'' Devils GM Lou Lamoriello said from New Jersey.
    Flyers player rep Robert Esche applauded the developments.

    ''I'm sure not everybody is happy out there,'' he said. ''I'm sure there's some players not happy with a hard cap and some owners not happy at not having linkage.

    ''But, hey, it's a give-and-take world. Now it seems we're just down to numbers.''

    The unexpected Monday development probably surprised and unsettled many on each side. But the fact that both felt the pinch may also signify the two sides have finally found an area of compromise.

    ''Am I excited about a salary cap? No. But it's about trying to get a deal done,'' said Calgary star Jarome Iginla.

    Richard Peddie, president and CEO of Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment, deflected a question about what the owners had given up by taking the linkage issue off the table.

    ''All I can tell you is that we've been kept apprised and we'd really like to play hockey this year,'' he said. ''But it has to be the right deal, even for the Toronto Maple Leafs.

    ''Even our revenues are drying up, believe it or not. We want a deal that's also good for the Leafs.''

    Even if it is too late to save the season, the change in positions may still set the stage for a settlement that could pave the way for the entry draft and a more normal offseason.

    Jay McKee, the Buffalo Sabres defenceman, was concerned about how much harm a five-month-long lockout has had on the sport and its fan base.

    ''It's not so much that I'm angry that they offered a cap. I'm angry that why now?'' McKee said. ''Why not last June, last July?''

    The surprising developments came during a secret meeting Monday in Niagara Falls, N.Y., between Saskin and NHL executive vice-president Bill Daly.

    Daly began the process by offering his cap figure without a fixed link between player costs and league revenues. The association countered with the $52-million salary cap per team and its 24-per-cent rollback on existing salaries.

    The Philadelphia Inquirer and others reported Tuesday that Flyers centre Jeremy Roenick, along with Iginla, St. Louis's Chris Pronger and others, urged association leaders to put a cap with no linkage on the table in a bid to save the season.

    ''I was involved with a group of NHL players who were trying to get to as many people as possible to come on board with a resolution that works for both sides,'' Roenick told the Inquirer. ''The proposal has to have a number that is not tied to revenues.''

    But Iginla played down any role he may have had.



    ''I have talked to Pronger and Roenick but also to many guys around the league, because we're interested in what's going down,'' he told CP. ''But, ultimately, it's the committee that's doing all this, not me.



    ''If people ask me my opinion, I'll give it, and I have.''



    Iginla and Esche both shot down other reports saying the group of players actually had a proposal for the league.



    According to a source, the NHLPA offer breaks down like this:



    A cap of $52 million but with provisions for teams to spend as much as 10 per cent more than that on three occasions in a six-year period, with a luxury tax incorporated. The luxury tax rates would be 25 per cent on $40-$44 million; 50 per cent on $44-$48 million; 75 per cent on $48-$52 million and 150 per cent on $52-$57.2 million.



    The league's final offer Tuesday featured a $42.5-million cap, with a 50 per cent luxury tax on payrolls from $34 million to $42.5 million.



    The Monday development could also have a major impact on the league's ability to declare a legal impasse down the road if there's no deal and the season is cancelled. The union could perhaps argue to the U.S. National Labor Relations Board that there is no impasse in talks because the philosophical issue of a salary cap is no longer the deal-breaker.



    The NHL is hoping to avoid becoming the first major professional league in North America to cancel a season from beginning to end.



    ''I'm extremely concerned,'' said Flyers captain Keith Primeau. ''The biggest thing that disturbs me is everyone's true misunderstanding of the fan base.



    ''You hear how certain people believe that the hardcore fan will definitely return, that the damage isn't irreparable. I think that's a huge miscalculation or judgment in error of who and what your fan base is. That, I think, is going to alarm a lot of people when the doors are re-opened.''



    Through Tuesday, 834 of the 1,230 regular-season games have gone by the wayside.



    If an agreement can still be reached, the league has a shortened schedule ready to go that would see teams play 28 regular-season games, playing only within their conference. The playoffs would stay the same.


    ''We probably could've gotten this thing done in the summertime,'' Chicago forward Matthew Barnaby said. ''Am I mad? No. I want to get back to work.

    ''At the same time, I'm just a little disappointed that it went this far to play poker and to have someone call your bluff
    http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/news_story.asp...48&hubName=nhl

  7. #527
    On ice duckgirl's Avatar
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    Man, I hate the NHL right now. My hatred of Bettman has surpassed even my hatred of Hasek.

  8. #528
    Hockey is life! EvaLaruefan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckgirl
    Man, I hate the NHL right now. My hatred of Bettman has surpassed even my hatred of Hasek.

    Didn't that happen a long time ago Ducky?

  9. #529
    On ice duckgirl's Avatar
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    Not really actually, I hated Hasek a lot more for a lot longer. But now I hate Bettman a lot more.

    NHL, NHLPA separated by $6.5 million

    $6.5 million. That's IT. They are seriously going to let the NHL die over $6 million?

    *goes off to stab someone*

  10. #530
    eny
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    I was involved in union negotiations for years. If I were a member of the nhlpa I would want to know why it wasn't put to vote , or any of these offers have been put to a vote.
    The union leadership just says here it is - we don't recommend you accept it , but the membership ultimately decides to go back or stay out- NOT the union leaders.

    This is fishy, and notgoodenough needs to go as a rep of a union.

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