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Thread: Best Funerals Ever.

  1. #21
    FORT Fogey MsDiva2007's Avatar
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    Balloons yes,barbecue sauce and live pigs nope.
    Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.
    Martin Luther King, Jr.

  2. #22
    Bloomin' FoRT Fanatic! ness's Avatar
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    OK.

    FINALLY saw the whole show.

    And SHOW is the right word for these homegoings.

    Whoah.

    BBQ Funeral - Ladies carrying platters of giant ribs down the aisle? The body brought in in a stylized meat smoker with the pallbearers decked out in chefs' toques (AND aprons, IIRC)? A BBQ sauce fountain? Live pigs? Picnic tables set up for a BBQ/picnic nosh BEFORE the service? The pastor/preacher decked out in a chef's toque, too?

    Please.

    Christmas Funeral - The body brought in in a Santa sleigh. Elves. A gingerbread cookie and snowman sitting in the crowd. Snowflakes falling. Santas in the procession on the sleigh with the body and sitting on the pulpit. Live animals. Wise Men processing into the service in stylized lockstep.

    OK. Head starting to spin now, so I'll just drop that one right there.

    DOUBLE please.

    Professional Mourners - Honestly, even though I just might HAVE heard about this, at some point, when this was brought up during the show, I didn't ever recall having heard of it before. So, when the funeral home guy said professional mourners were referred to in Amos, in the Bible, I actually looked it up.

    They WERE.

    OK.

    Whatever works for you to make a few ducats? Hey, go for it. But . . . The Tornado? The gal who hit the floor during mourners' class and clung onto the casket, screeching her lungs out? The woman who got up during an actual service and appeared to be in the throes of electrocution?

    TRIPLE please.

    Personally, if it were me, if professional mourning were something I'd do/get involved in, there is NO WAY IN HELL I would EVER allow myself to be shown on national TV engaging in it.

    NO way.

    And again, whatever someone's family/friends feel they need to do to cope with the loss of and/or honor their deceased loved one, I say: "Sail ON, sailors!"

    But, if anyone in my family ever so much as even THOUGHT about doing any of this stuff to me after I'm gone and can't say anything about it, I'd find a way to come back and haunt them to THEIR graves.

    Trust and BELIEVE that.

    I'm glad I saw the whole thing, if for no other reason than that I've broadened my horizons in actually seeing exactly HOW far some people can take an aspect of a situation. ESPECIALLY when that situation happens to be centered on someone's funeral rites.

    I've learned something new.

    And nope, won't be watching again, thank you very much.

    momrek, yes, I'm in the Southeast (Atlanta). While I'm pretty sure that there must be people in this state that have funerals/homegoing services of this OTT nature, I've gotta admit, I don't personally know of or have heard of anybody who has, here. The closest I personally have come to a really non-traditional, personalized homegoing service was for a co-worker of mine who'd passed on. His entire service consisted of classical music pieces and hymns and spirituals that he'd loved. No eulogy. No "tornadoes". No screeching. Nothing but music he loved. The musical numbers just flowed one into the other. Sure, it was all very emotional and moving, and we cried, but it was all very dignified and beautiful, and something I'd never seen/been to before or since.

    And something I've never forgotten.

    I can actually see and understand how, when they were trying to find a fair in or near Dallas that'd let them hold Jerry's service there and take his remains on rides, the funeral planners got hung up on, or had eyes rolled at them. As we all have seen from this show, sometimes, a reasonable idea can be taken far out of the realm of what is considered "normal", or dignified. Some of these ideas just go way, WAY off the scale of what a lot people can handle. ESPECIALLY when the subject that is being centered on is somebody's last rites.

    And Tilden was completely correct regarding the standard New Orleans method of funerals, or homegoing services. TOTALLY different ball game from what we saw in this show, I think.

    So, even though Dallas IS Southern, too, there ARE different strokes for different folks all over the map.

    Golden Gate --- which I'm pretty sure must have its share of traditional funeral services --- apparently just happens to also cater to a particular segment of the Dallas, etc., population that care to indulge in OTT homegoing services. And THEY happen to be willing to go that extra mile or two (or fifteen) to give their customers what it is that they say they want.

    For a PRICE, of course.

    Bless their heart.

    Me? I've got a real problem with the fact that I believe these sort of rites seem to --- IMHO --- turn the deceased person and their life --- for the most part --- into a mini-production for the benefit of the ones left behind.

    And televising it?

    No way.

    I've checked it out, and now I'm checking out.

    I've seen more than enough of this show.
    momrek06 and MsDiva2007 like this.
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  3. #23
    FORT Fogey MsDiva2007's Avatar
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    Yeah now when I see someone losing it at a funeral, my mind will say professional mourner? Which is sad.
    momrek06 likes this.
    Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.
    Martin Luther King, Jr.

  4. #24
    Bloomin' FoRT Fanatic! ness's Avatar
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    Quote Originally Posted by MsDiva2007 View Post
    Yeah now when I see someone losing it at a funeral, my mind will say professional mourner? Which is sad.
    Ain't THAT the livin' truth.
    momrek06 and MsDiva2007 like this.
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  5. #25
    FORT Fogey momrek06's Avatar
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    OMG ness, your post is DEAD on......(no pun intended)!!!!

    MD......OMG, too funny.....I think my mind is going to say PM too!!!!

    You both have made me LOL tonight!!!!
    ness and MsDiva2007 like this.
    KAREN

  6. #26
    Bloomin' FoRT Fanatic! ness's Avatar
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    Quote Originally Posted by momrek06 View Post
    OMG ness, your post is DEAD on......(no pun intended)!!!!

    MD......OMG, too funny.....I think my mind is going to say PM too!!!!

    You both have made me LOL tonight!!!!
    Well . . .

    I just calls 'em like I sees 'em!!!!!!!!!!
    momrek06 likes this.
    "In a world of pollution, profanity, adolescence, broccoli, zits, ozone depletion, racism, sexism, stupid guys and PMS, why the hell do people still tell me to have a nice day?" - Unknown

  7. #27
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    I may be mistaken, but I'm pretty sure that any funeral director will tell you that the funeral is for the family....the people left behind. I wish I could run into some of my funeral director/educated friends..... I have questions!
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

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  8. #28
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    Quote Originally Posted by prhoshay View Post
    I may be mistaken, but I'm pretty sure that any funeral director will tell you that the funeral is for the family....the people left behind. I wish I could run into some of my funeral director/educated friends..... I have questions!

    That's true, but if a particular house of worship is involved, what the family wants may be over-ruled, because it doesn't fit with the nature of a that religion/denomination's beliefs regarding funeral services. I've heard some pretty amazing stories from ministers who are now more cautious when helping families set up funerals, because they've had bad experiences as the result of not asking enough questions. For instance, one minister had always asked if any family members would be interested in coming forward during the service to offer some thoughts about the deceased, if no one cared to do an official eulogy. It had always worked before, until the time an adult son came forward, stood by his father's open casket for a moment--and then spit directly into his father's face and had to be dragged out of the service pitching a fit. After that, he asked a few more questions about which family members would be coming forward and what kind of "tribute" they were thinking of offering. Granted, nothing that awful ever happened again, but just in case, he now asks, and typically gets the kind of response you might expect--someone wanting to tell a favorite story about the deceased, read a selection of poetry or a special Bible verse. You know, the sort of thing that you might expect. But the minister in question just never wanted to deal with the horribly unexpected again, because it upset not only him but everyone else at the funeral.

    Another minister I know now insists that any music played or sung during the official funeral service in the church be religious in nature. He doesn't care if it's contemporary or classical or a traditional hymn, but it has to be religious. Anything else he asks be saved for whatever sort of reception is held after the funeral. He does this, because as a young minister, he simply asked the family if they had someone who would be providing music or if they needed help finding someone, and on one occasion, a family said they had a friend who could sing, and he left it at that. The "friend" showed up in full country western gear, put one cowboy booted foot on the casket, and sang, "Home on the Range." Let's just say the reaction from the people there was mixed to say the least (and it didn't appear that even the family knew that he would put his foot up on the casket). He told me he felt that after that, it was just best to play it safe.

    Then there was the time an interim minister was called to the funeral home, because an elderly couple's estranged son had died in California, and when he arrived at the local funeral home, he was heavily tattooed, dressed in biker gang gear, and had a six pack beside him, and joints in his shirt pocket. The undertaker didn't know how to explain any of that to his parents. The minister, being an interim pastor, barely knew the parents, but told him to call the cops about the beer and the joints, since he shouldn't have been shipped cross country with them, and that he'd advise the parents that a closed casket funeral might be an appropriate choice, so that the rest of the family, who also hadn't seen him in years, could remember the young man they had known.

  9. #29
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    The barbecue funeral and the professional mourners made the Clip of the Week on The Soup. Even Joel McHale didn't seem to know what to say.

    Personally, the barbecue sauce fountain made me uncomfortable, because the way the instructions were announced as to how the mourners should proceed to deal with it sounded kind of like the instructions that are given prior to communion. I'd be more than fine if someone wanted to host a barbecue to celebrate someone's life, but combining it with the actual funeral, which did seem to have at least some religious connections, seemed really awkward to me, and not like a New Orleans jazz funeral, where there are definite demarcations between the mourning and the celebrating.

    And though I do love ribs, I also just can't imagine too many things more messy than a barbecue fountain. I wouldn't want to dress nicely for a funeral, out of respect for the deceased and the family, only to end up with sauce down my front.

  10. #30
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    Re: Best Funerals Ever.

    Quote Originally Posted by prhoshay View Post
    I may be mistaken, but I'm pretty sure that any funeral director will tell you that the funeral is for the family....the people left behind. I wish I could run into some of my funeral director/educated friends..... I have questions!

    That's true, but if a particular house of worship is involved, what the family wants may be over-ruled, because it doesn't fit with the nature of a that religion/denomination's beliefs regarding funeral services. I've heard some pretty amazing stories from ministers who are now more cautious when helping families set up funerals, because they've had bad experiences as the result of not asking enough questions. For instance, one minister had always asked if any family members would be interested in coming forward during the service to offer some thoughts about the deceased, if no one cared to do an official eulogy. It had always worked before, until the time an adult son came forward, stood by his father's open casket for a moment--and then spit directly into his father's face and had to be dragged out of the service pitching a fit. After that, he asked a few more questions about which family members would be coming forward and what kind of "tribute" they were thinking of offering. Granted, nothing that awful ever happened again, but just in case, he now asks, and typically gets the kind of response you might expect--someone wanting to tell a favorite story about the deceased, read a selection of poetry or a special Bible verse. You know, the sort of thing that you might expect. But the minister in question just never wanted to deal with the horribly unexpected again, because it upset not only him but everyone else at the funeral.

    Another minister I know now insists that any music played or sung during the official funeral service in the church be religious in nature. He doesn't care if it's contemporary or classical or a traditional hymn, but it has to be religious. Anything else he asks be saved for whatever sort of reception is held after the funeral. He does this, because as a young minister, he simply asked the family if they had someone who would be providing music or if they needed help finding someone, and on one occasion, a family said they had a friend who could sing, and he left it at that. The "friend" showed up in full country western gear, put one cowboy booted foot on the casket, and sang, "Home on the Range." Let's just say the reaction from the people there was mixed to say the least (and it didn't appear that even the family knew that he would put his foot up on the casket). He told me he felt that after that, it was just best to play it safe.

    Then there was the time an interim minister was called to the funeral home, because an elderly couple's estranged son had died in California, and when he arrived at the local funeral home, he was heavily tattooed, dressed in biker gang gear, and had a six pack beside him, and joints in his shirt pocket. The undertaker didn't know how to explain any of that to his parents. The minister, being an interim pastor, barely knew the parents, but told him to call the cops about the beer and the joints, since he shouldn't have been shipped cross country with them, and that he'd advise the parents that a closed casket funeral might be an appropriate choice, so that the rest of the family, who also hadn't seen him in years, could remember the young man they had known.

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