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Thread: The Great Food Truck Race

  1. #101
    FORT Fogey TripleGemini's Avatar
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    Quote Originally Posted by Tilden View Post
    Also, does anyone know if there really is such a thing as food truck etiquette that makes it inappropriate for one truck to try and convince those in a long line for food at another truck to come their way instead? I'm surprised some people didn't just make the move on their own, unless they really, really wanted to try Korilla's food. And if they felt that way, I don't know that Hodge Podge could have convinced them to order from their truck anyway.
    Officially, I don't know that there's a rule, but there is always etiquette. But the woman from Hodge Podge wasn't trying to convince anyone to go to their truck, she was basically serving them a snack while they waited to be served by Korilla.

    I want to know who cheats (or tries to cheat) next week. And what is actually considered "cheating" on a show where Tyler didn't call out Korilla for not participating in the first challenge (the one where they had to make sausage) or Hodge Podge from serving tacos to people waiting for Korilla. Or any of the other things that we've seen that just didn't quite seem right.

  2. #102
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    Good point about the cheating. Since they're supposed to be serving just vegetarian food at some point, maybe one of the trucks serves meat past the point at which they were supposed to make the switch. I think that could be considered cheating, as it would directly violate the rules of the competition. Same thing with continuing to sell food past the point they were supposed to stop. Or maybe stealing supplies or money from another truck or supplementing whatever cash they're given for supplies with their own money.

    My guess is for it to be cheating, they had to do something they were directly told not to do, so there was no question about whether or not they could choose to do something different ala Korilla opting out of that competition and just keeping the meat to supplement their supplies.

    I am curious as to what the penalty for cheating might be? Are they disqualified entirely and asked to leave the game or do they just have to face some kind of punishment in the next round, like less money for supplies or being given a terrible location or having to sit someone out or something like that? Perhaps it would depend on the severity of the violation.

  3. #103
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    Okay, I just saw the first half of this week's episode, which I missed on the earlier showing. Who the heck does Lime Truck think it is? I'm not even from Kansas, and I find it insulting that they said they were "dumbing" down their menu, that it was the smallest place they'd ever been etc. Same thing with Korilla thinking they had to give a Kansas food critic a history lesson about their food, because he probably wouldn't know anything about Korean food. Uh, that particular Kansas critic has been published in Best Food Writing 2006 (I know, because I own it). He's actually pretty well known. And of course, Seabirds had to assume there wouldn't be any vegans in town, because it was Kansas.

    it's a freaking' college town with 23,000 students. They're not all going to be from Kansas. Even if they were, the great plains are more diverse than people think they are (or at least than these people think they are). And let's face it: there are areas of big cities that can be every bit as provincial and closed-minded in their own ways as small towns can be in theirs.

    Love how everyone thinks that it's a "small town" too. Let me introduce you city-folks from L.A, Boston, and New York to the concept of a small town: it's one where the high school is incorporated and it takes all the teenagers in three communities to create a graduating class of seventy-five. It's one where you can tell who's in town that day by looking at the cars parked on Main Street. It's one where you can be working there for a week, have someone mis-address a letter to you, and have it arrive at your place of work, rather than the non-existent street address on the envelope, with a handwritten note next to the address that says "works at_______," even though you know absolutely no one who works at the post office (that actually happened to me in a town of about 2,000---and I was only a summer intern; I wasn't even a permanent new resident in town).

    Oh, yeah, and why is it when trucks ran out of food, they had to close down completely and all run to the grocery store together? Why didn't they realize they were coming close to running out, send one person in the car on a grocery run, and leave the other two working in the truck?

  4. #104
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    The word on the street is out in every town. People want to see the TV show being taped and the long lines have nothing to do with being hungry. I hate to keep harping on how good the show was last season but I cannot hold back. It was better.

    Korilla is sucessful and I am sure their food is good. I would love to see it! The glimpses we get are not enough. I still have no clue what the original menu is on any of these trucks. Last season I was introduced to a bon mi sandwich by Nom Nom and have made them many times since. They are delicious. The pickled carrots and daikon radish are a good addition to other sandwiches and burgers as well.

    I was stunned and horrified to see Hodge Podge pressing their burgers on the grill! When is "never press a burger" going to become common knowledge. More home cooks know this than restaurants!

    The prevailing attitude that the midwest is less than, is apauling. The Lime truck was not the only guilty party; the Seabirds had things to say, as well. And what does the name Seabirds have to do with food, anyway? The graphics on their truck make no sense either.

    Tilden. I think it must be a rule that if they run out of food they have to shut down. I think they do take the car to restock and leave the truck in place since they reopen in the exact location. There is never a mention of losing their spot.

    Tyler said someone "tried" to cheat. Since they lose their power, perhaps one truck tried to hook up to electricity from a business with an extention chord but failed at this attempt or were caught.
    Last edited by Shoepie; 09-05-2011 at 06:36 AM.

  5. #105
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    Another way a team could have "tried" to cheat is by contacting a local restaurant and asking to use their kitchen. Whatever it was, they did not succeed so probably cannot be punished. The likely suspect is Korilla having seen their creativity with the sausage Truck Stop.

  6. #106
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoepie View Post
    The word on the street is out in every town. People want to see the TV show being taped and the long lines have nothing to do with being hungry. I hate to keep harping on how good the show was last season but I cannot hold back. It was better.

    Korilla is sucessful and I am sure their food is good. I would love to see it! The glimpses we get are not enough. I still have no clue what the original menu is on any of these trucks. Last season I was introduced to a bon mi sandwich by Nom Nom and have made them many times since. They are delicious. The pickled carrots and daikon radish are a good addition to other sandwiches and burgers as well.

    I was stunned and horrified to see Hodge Podge pressing their burgers on the grill! When is "never press a burger" going to become common knowledge. More home cooks know this than restaurants!

    The prevailing attitude that the midwest is less than, is apauling. The Lime truck was not the only guilty party; the Seabirds had things to say, as well. And what does the name Seabirds have to do with food, anyway? The graphics on their truck make no sense either.

    Tilden. I think it must be a rule that if they run out of food they have to shut down. I think they do take the car to restock and leave the truck in place since they reopen in the exact location. There is never a mention of losing their spot.



    Tyler said someone "tried" to cheat. Since they lose their power, perhaps one truck tried to hook up to electricity from a business with an extention chord but failed at this attempt or were caught.

    If people are waiting in line for an hour and a half just to watch a television show taping lines and trucks, you'd think they'd catch on sooner that it's not going to be that exciting. If they're waiting in hopes of seeing a fleeting glimpse of themselves on television, that's even sadder. Beyond that, it makes the show even less about food or marketing than about people just wanting to see or be seen on television.

    Nom Nom's food may be delicious. Korilla's may be as well. But it's kind of boring when a competition show has the same competitor winning over and over again. That being said, having seen both trucks, I would go to Nom Nom before Korilla, simply because their attitude was better. Korilla also does things that, if not outright cheating, are a bit sketchy. They opted out of a challenge to save the meat involved with the challenge for the competition on a week when their budget was very tight, which was not in the spirit of the show--the idea was to see what they could do with a limited budget unless they won the challenge, in which case they would get extra money. This week, when they were only given $5, they thought it was a great idea (they didn't say so but they laughed like they hit the jackpot) when they saw all the little packets of condiments at the deli part of the store, where they weren't buying a sandwich etc., and grabbed them by the handfuls to supplement their budget. No, it wasn't against the rules, and yes, the store put those out for free--but for the people who actually bought something pre-made on which to place them. People grabbing them by the handfuls is why more places aren't putting them out in the first place. If they'd asked whoever was at the counter if they could have the packets they were grabbing, because of the competition, and were told yes, fine. But it just seemed rude to take so many, when it meant the store would have to pay for them and perhaps other customers would have to go without if things got busy and they didn't have time to restock (or didn't notice it needed restocking so soon--sometimes people will be annoyed that things aren't available but not annoyed enough to complain, even if it affects their future feelings about the place).

    Yes, the Lime Truck wasn't the only truck to complain about the midwest--as I pointed out, the Korilla truck acted as if a midwestern food critic would automatically know nothing about Korean food, and the Seabirds once again assumed there would be no vegans. About the only truck that did say anything nice was Roxy's, where one of the guys did seem impressed by the open landscape and appreciated people waiting for them to get back. As for them having to close down if they run out of food, that's why I wondered why they didn't send someone out for food when they noticed they were getting low as opposed to waiting until they ran out completely. If it's against the rules to send one person out for supplies while the other two run the truck, they need to establish that for the audience. That's a huge problem with the show. It's unclear what trucks are allowed to do--and, in the case of Korilla skipping that sausage challenge, it seemed unclear to the other contestants too--and what they aren't allowed to do. They've laid out a few basics, but not many. If it's food truck Survivor, and you can lie and be obnoxious and win whether your food is the best or not, then make that clear to everyone. If everyone has to participate in every challenge (or at least try to, ala Top Chef Quick Fires, where sometimes someone is ultimately unable to show a dish but not because he/she made no attempt), make sure everyone knows that--and if they can skip one if they choose, make sure everyone knows that too. As for attempting to cheat, they need a rule about that that's clear to everyone too, because if there's no type of punishment for trying to cheat, then it's going to encourage people to do so, since it won't cost them anything but a scolding if they get caught (and if you're willing to cheat, you're probably not that concerned about the scolding), and it could benefit them greatly if they try and don't get caught. Sure, some people won't cheat anyway, regardless of whether there's a punishment or not, but for people who are willing to play more fast and loose with the rules, it'll make it that more attractive to do so. If a truck tries to cheat and gets caught before they're able to give themselves any advantage, I could see why they would think it was unnecessary to disqualify the truck entirely, but they could still penalize them for trying to cheat by, say, reducing their budget in the next city, forcing them to sit someone out, telling them to close down for that day as soon as they're caught etc.

    Other shows have rules in place to handle contestants trying to wriggle out of difficult situations they're supposed to confront head on. They have rules to keep them from finding cheating too enticing as well. I remember a Project Runway contestant being sent home because he was found to have pattern books in his room and had left to use the phone in violation of specific rules regarding making calls without the show's knowledge. They didn't have to prove either one gave him an advantage: they were against the rules, he knew it, everyone else knew it, he got caught, he got auf'd. PR also had Tim Gunn explain to the audience what the rule was, how it was broken, and why it had been in place. Whoever designed the Great Food Truck Race obviously didn't anticipate a team pushing the boundaries of the competition, as Korilla has, and they should have. It's not like it hasn't happened on other shows before this, so they should have either decided it didn't matter--and made sure everyone, including the audience, knew it didn't matter--or make clear what did matter to everyone.

  7. #107
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    I can't believe these people's attitudes towards those who live in what they consider "fly over country". They think that people in small towns are so much less sophisticated than they are, but having lived both on the coasts and in the middle of the country I can tell you "big city" people are way more ignorant about the small town people than vice versa. The kind of ignorance it takes to assume that because someone lives in Kansas they wouldn't know good food, or Korean food, is stunning.

    I don't know if there's an accepted food truck etiquette, but I don't have much problem with getting "snack orders" from people waiting in a long line at another truck. They weren't trying to get them to leave the line and come to their truck and take the business away.

    I'm just not really liking all the speed bumps and crud and I find it terribly boring that on yet another show there's one contestant that wins every time. How boring does that get.

  8. #108
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    Quote Originally Posted by Duckyface View Post
    I can't believe these people's attitudes towards those who live in what they consider "fly over country". They think that people in small towns are so much less sophisticated than they are, but having lived both on the coasts and in the middle of the country I can tell you "big city" people are way more ignorant about the small town people than vice versa. The kind of ignorance it takes to assume that because someone lives in Kansas they wouldn't know good food, or Korean food, is stunning.

    I don't know if there's an accepted food truck etiquette, but I don't have much problem with getting "snack orders" from people waiting in a long line at another truck. They weren't trying to get them to leave the line and come to their truck and take the business away.

    I'm just not really liking all the speed bumps and crud and I find it terribly boring that on yet another show there's one contestant that wins every time. How boring does that get.
    I was once at a national conference, full of well educated people, when someone asked at the business meeting why said conference was never held in the midwest, when so many of the people who regularly attended were lived in the country's midsection. Someone from New York (not to criticize New Yorkers specifically--this person just happened to be from there) snapped that it was hard to get to the midwest from the east coast. Uh, the conference that year was on the east coast. All of the midwestern attendees managed to get there just fine and were certainly flying home as well. If we could get to the east coast and back, they could reverse the process. It's not like anyone was expecting to hold the conference in some tiny town without an airport. We were thinking more like Minneapolis or Chicago, which are not difficult travel destinations (and that conference is generally held in mid-October, before weather becomes all that much of a concern in those cities). So, yeah, I'd tend to agree that people who regard the middle portion of the country solely as fly over territory are clueless when it comes to what actually goes on there.

    I'm not sure if I have all that much trouble with two trucks competing for the same customers. I'm not sure what the difference would be between taking orders from people in someone else's line as opposed to, say, shouting through a bullhorn that they had food ready now, same price, no lines at Hodgepodge. Except that they didn't have a bullhorn, so they sent one of the women from the truck instead. Considering that Korilla has congratulated themselves for bending the rules as far as they can to get an advantage, they really have no right to get incensed with Hodgepodge for what they did, unless they were all specifically told that such behavior was against the rules. So far as we know, they weren't--and I kind of think if they were told that, Hodgepodge wouldn't have been so blatant about it.

  9. #109
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    I didn't mind that Nom Nom swept most of the wins. They had better food and were able to whip it out quickly. They deserved every victory. Every truck had a chance to up their game and overtake them. They failed to do so. I thought it was a fair, straight forward competition. Well, until the end with that stupid foot race. It should be about food only. I enjoyed every minute of it, though.

  10. #110
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    Re: The Great Food Truck Race

    Same thing with Korilla thinking they had to give a Kansas food critic a history lesson about their food, because he probably wouldn't know anything about Korean food.
    I didn't get that vibe at all. I took it more as a bit of history to make the presentation more interesting rather than a food lesson. I don't know of many non-Koreans who have ever heard of King Sejong (who also invented the Korean alphabet, by the way). If they said or implied anything about giving a lesson in Korean food itself I missed it.

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