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Thread: What Would You Do? (ABC)

  1. #31
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    Quote Originally Posted by bachelorwatcher;4151647;
    The show could be completely fake; or maybe the guy noticed a loud, contrived situation and wanted to be on TV again. In most of the segments, the actors are projecting their voices as if they were in a play, and the dialogue sounds fake. I don't always pay close attention to the segments, especially the ones that seem too fake. If they show reruns, I'll have to pay close attention to the two scenarios that you wrote about.
    I think you can still find them online.

    Here is the guy I am talking about:
    (can't post link - so just google "ABC what would you do fake")


    The mean girls scenario can be found on the ABC website.
    (can't post link - Dec 17 episode)

    The pedophile episode can be found on youtube.
    (search for "what would you do girl")

    We are having a huge discussion about this at my work place because my colleague is from New Jersey and she swears by the fact that the show has to be real, but I have my doubts. What do you think?

  2. #32
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    Quote Originally Posted by TV viewer;4152049;
    I think you can still find them online. Here is the guy I am talking about: (can't post link - so just google "ABC what would you do fake") The mean girls scenario can be found on the ABC website. (can't post link - Dec 17 episode) The pedophile episode can be found on youtube. (search for "what would you do girl") We are having a huge discussion about this at my work place because my colleague is from New Jersey and she swears by the fact that the show has to be real, but I have my doubts. What do you think?
    I don't know if this show is real or not, but if it's fake, why go to the trouble of having loud "mini-plays" in public? On the most recent episode, a boy in a toy store wants a doll. Then in another segment, a boy in a toy store was wearing a princess dress. I quickly lost interest in that scenario. No customers said anything, so they hired an actor to stir things up. I've never seen either of these scenarios. One segment was about an overweight woman in a reataurant. A man's face was blurred. He then turned, and his face was visible! There was a segment on a poor mother who needed about sixty dollars for food at a grocery store. The reactions were positive. One man didn't help. Later he said that the was on food stamps too. I asked a grocery store checker if she has ever had a customer pay a huge food bill for another custormer. She said that sometimes one customer will help another customer if they neeed a few cents to pay a bill... but she's never seen a customer ask another customer to pay a huge food bill. They had an actor stir things up in the scenario because none of the customers criticized the woman. The actor who stirred things up happens to be bald and has been in several scenarios. He usually plays store managers. The most common real-life scenarios that I see are people looking through trash for cans and bottles. Another common sight is police telling the homeless to move along. The show wants ideas. I might e-mail them with some very specific suggestions. There are scenarios that could help vulnerable people. Also, they should have more everyday occurences that viewers would be familiar with... but, I know that they have certain agendas that they're trying to push.

  3. #33
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    On this show I most like to watch the domestic violence sorts of scenarios or things like that because that's what interests me most about how people will react.

    On a side note, the buying groceries at stores for other people thing might depend on where you live as to how normal it is. Here it's something that is done more often that one would think. Especially around holiday time. Other customers pick up the tab or partial tab of the folks around them. But there's also a lot of poverty here so when there's wealth it's typically shared because most of the people who live here have been there. I know I bought a small collection of groceries for someone once.

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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    Quote Originally Posted by causingchaos;4160395;
    On this show I most like to watch the domestic violence sorts of scenarios or things like that because that's what interests me most about how people will react. On a side note, the buying groceries at stores for other people thing might depend on where you live as to how normal it is. Here it's something that is done more often that one would think. Especially around holiday time. Other customers pick up the tab or partial tab of the folks around them. But there's also a lot of poverty here so when there's wealth it's typically shared because most of the people who live here have been there. I know I bought a small collection of groceries for someone once.
    There's a segment of the populatiion that's poor where I live... and they either look through trash for cans and bottles, or stand on a street corner with a sign asking for money. What about the people in your area who are always poor, and not just temporarily poor? Do you have a sort of permanent population of people on street corners with signs? I wish the show would focus on our most vulnerable, disadvantaged citizens. A lot of the scenarios seem frivolous... such as people breaking vases in an antique store.
    Last edited by bachelorwatcher; 01-27-2011 at 03:03 AM.

  5. #35
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    Quote Originally Posted by bachelorwatcher;4166207;
    There's a segment of the populatiion that's poor where I live... and they either look through trash for cans and bottles, or stand on a street corner with a sign asking for money. What about the people in your area who are always poor, and not just temporarily poor? Do you have a sort of permanent population of people on street corners with signs? I wish the show would focus on our most vulnerable, disadvantaged citizens. A lot of the scenarios seem frivolous... such as people breaking vases in an antique store.
    It's rural. So we have a small population of homeless/transient people in town. However when I say the area is in poverty I mean like the entire area lives in poverty think more like Appalachia (not where I live but similar economic issues) not like an urban area. So it's a different mind set. And it's been like this forever here. Not just with the last recession. There are a few people with money here and there but mostly not. I mean when a "good" job pays $9/hr with no benefits and is part time that says something. That being said the cost of living is lower because you can't get money where there's none to be given. So you can legitimately get a decent apartment for $400/month. You can a house on a nice lot for $40,000 or less in some cases. But they're old houses. So it's not like being urban where the cost of living is higher.

    But we all help each other out. If someone is struggling to pay for groceries because they lost a job then help is given. We've all been there. I grew up here when there was an 80% unemployment rate because the single industry started to buckle (in the town I lived in then literally the only people with steady work were the teachers). This is basically a single industry area and when it goes down it's not cute. And that's what happened when this recession started as well. The unemployment rate went through the roof. We helped each other out. It was really interesting to watch if people were going to protect their own interests or the interests of the group.

  6. #36
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    Quote Originally Posted by causingchaos;4166236;
    It's rural. So we have a small population of homeless/transient people in town. However when I say the area is in poverty I mean like the entire area lives in poverty think more like Appalachia (not where I live but similar economic issues) not like an urban area. So it's a different mind set. And it's been like this forever here. Not just with the last recession. There are a few people with money here and there but mostly not. I mean when a "good" job pays $9/hr with no benefits and is part time that says something. That being said the cost of living is lower because you can't get money where there's none to be given. So you can legitimately get a decent apartment for $400/month. You can a house on a nice lot for $40,000 or less in some cases. But they're old houses. So it's not like being urban where the cost of living is higher. But we all help each other out. If someone is struggling to pay for groceries because they lost a job then help is given. We've all been there. I grew up here when there was an 80% unemployment rate because the single industry started to buckle (in the town I lived in then literally the only people with steady work were the teachers). This is basically a single industry area and when it goes down it's not cute. And that's what happened when this recession started as well. The unemployment rate went through the roof. We helped each other out. It was really interesting to watch if people were going to protect their own interests or the interests of the group.
    If you're from a rural area, then everyone must know everyone else... or at least know the economic situation of everyone else, since the one local industry closed. I'm just familiar with urben/suburban areas, and I rarely run into someone that I know. I was surprised when people were willing to pay the grocery bill of a stranger in that segment. Sometimes I see grocery store employees putting food in carts back on the shelves. I assume that the shoppers forgot their wallets or didn't have enough money... so they leave without groceries. Where I live, there are strangers who help others. Once I saw a man take a slice out of a take-out pizza that he had just bought, and give it to a man sitting in a dooway. He said to the man, "Here, this is for you." There is a downtown soup kitchen.

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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    causingchaos, Also, what's different about your situation compared to the woman on the show... is that none of the people who helped the woman pay her grocery bill seemed to know her... and, the woman was on food stamps. So, whether a local plant closed down or didn't close down, the woman had food stamps. It's not as if sometimes she had enough money, and other times didn't have enough money: I think food stamps are guaranteed.


    The most recent show started out with an eating out segment. The actor who played the waiter was also a part-time waiter. I never eat in restaurants so I didn't watch that segment.


    The next segment was a repeat segment from a previous show, about people intentionally slipping and falling in grocery stores. I didn't watch that segment, since I've
    seen it before.


    The next segment: a beggar who "wasn't needy, but greedy." An actor posed as someone who could see, but pretended to be blind to get money. I've seen a lot of beggars standing on street corners trying to get money from passing motorists. The beggars are able-bodied and can see. I've never seen someone pretending to be blind while begging. What kind of message is the show giving... that beggars might not need money? There really are a lot of poor people in the world.


    The last segment was about mixed race families. I've seen a lot of mixed race families, but I've never seen anyone make comments. I didn't watch that segment.
    Last edited by bachelorwatcher; 01-29-2011 at 01:40 AM.

  8. #38
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    Quote Originally Posted by bachelorwatcher;4166411;
    If you're from a rural area, then everyone must know everyone else... or at least know the economic situation of everyone else, since the one local industry closed. I'm just familiar with urben/suburban areas, and I rarely run into someone that I know. I was surprised when people were willing to pay the grocery bill of a stranger in that segment. Sometimes I see grocery store employees putting food in carts back on the shelves. I assume that the shoppers forgot their wallets or didn't have enough money... so they leave without groceries. Where I live, there are strangers who help others. Once I saw a man take a slice out of a take-out pizza that he had just bought, and give it to a man sitting in a dooway. He said to the man, "Here, this is for you." There is a downtown soup kitchen.
    I don't know everyone here or their personal economic situations. Many people here have been on food stamps for many years because a part time jobs just don't pay that well. I think the difference between urban (and I lived in a bad urban neighborhood for awhile too) and rural is that here we're more likely to give people the benefit of the doubt even if we don't know them because we're all struggling together. When I've bought the groceries or gave people the extra it wasn't because I knew them personally or knew they worked at the local plant. It's because I knew they were struggling just like everyone else was and it didn't matter to me what their whole personal story is.

    I think when you deal with urban poverty you end up with more skepticism because there isn't a united struggle and the lingering idea that if they just did this or that they wouldn't be like that. If they just pulled up their bootstraps they could be successful too. Here there are no bootstraps to pull up.

    Although I'll admit that I have bought meals or coffee for homeless people when I lived urban as well. I won't give out cash but I will feed someone if they're hungry. For me that's just a human compassion thing. It can be a really dehumanizing experience to have to rely on a soup kitchen or live transient or homeless. And if for 10 minutes of my day I can help someone feel like they're worthy as a human being I'm ok with that.

    Now on the opposite side with the upcoming show on beggars. Living urban I did see people begging who appeared to have their stuff together. Which is why I don't hand out cash to people begging but offer to buy them a meal instead.

  9. #39
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    Quote Originally Posted by causingchaos;4169371;
    I don't know everyone here or their personal economic situations. Many people here have been on food stamps for many years because a part time jobs just don't pay that well. I think the difference between urban (and I lived in a bad urban neighborhood for awhile too) and rural is that here we're more likely to give people the benefit of the doubt even if we don't know them because we're all struggling together. When I've bought the groceries or gave people the extra it wasn't because I knew them personally or knew they worked at the local plant. It's because I knew they were struggling just like everyone else was and it didn't matter to me what their whole personal story is. I think when you deal with urban poverty you end up with more skepticism because there isn't a united struggle and the lingering idea that if they just did this or that they wouldn't be like that. If they just pulled up their bootstraps they could be successful too. Here there are no bootstraps to pull up. Although I'll admit that I have bought meals or coffee for homeless people when I lived urban as well. I won't give out cash but I will feed someone if they're hungry. For me that's just a human compassion thing. It can be a really dehumanizing experience to have to rely on a soup kitchen or live transient or homeless. And if for 10 minutes of my day I can help someone feel like they're worthy as a human being I'm ok with that. Now on the opposite side with the upcoming show on beggars. Living urban I did see people begging who appeared to have their stuff together. Which is why I don't hand out cash to people begging but offer to buy them a meal instead.
    Where I live, there have never been many manufacturing jobs. People for the most part are white collar, have a union job, or maybe work at a fast-food place. The people that I see collecting cans and bottles, are primarily young men. They could go to a community college for job training; but for whatever reason, they spend their days collecting cans and bottles. The people who collect money from motorists typically are men in their forties, who have longer hair and are rough looking. I don't think they really are middle class people pretending to be poor.


    The beggars from the most recent TV show were young and looked middle class. The first beggar that I saw years ago looked middle class and was middle-aged. He was standing outside the front door of a supermarket, and his two sons were with him. The sons were about 12 or 13 years old. Since then, I've never seen beggars who looked like the ones on the TV show; and I've never seen beggars who were blind, or who claimed to be blind.

  10. #40
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    Re: What Would You Do? (ABC)

    I had to do a search for Jon Quinones to find this thread as the search feature does not like the title of this show.

    I really love this show because I love WWYD situations. Of course what I think I would do and what I would actually do probably aren't the same things. When watching a situation on tv I'm just full of wisdom and all the right things to say or do. In real situations I would probably never get involved. Unless someone was being hurt.

    One of last nights scenarios was a black woman with her two young kids at a Christmas tree lot. Mom only had $25 for a tree. The kids were whining that they didn't like the $25 trees and wanted one of the $55 trees. Mom kept saying they only had $25 for a tree. One of the kids said, "But the other kids are getting the $55 trees." Another mother hears what's going on and she is deeply moved by the kids plight and wants them to have a $55 tree too. So her husband tells her to find out what tree they want and he'll buy it for them. Everyone is happy. Then dad kinda ruined the mood for me. Instead of saying something simple like, "One day you'll be able to pay it forward by doing a favor for someone." He got a little sanctimonious. Seemed more like rich white man imparting ethics lecture to poor urban black kids. The segment still tugged at the heart strings. Not because I thought the kids deserved the more expensive tree. But because the white mother was so emotional about wanting the kids to have the tree they wanted. It seemed like the most sincere moment of the show. It was a true Christmas Spirit moment.

    But. WWID? I would have told the kids to go find the best $25 tree they could. I would have helped the poor mom teach her kids how to be thankful for what they have. And had I been the mom who only had $25 for a tree I would have thanked the other family for their generous offer but my kids can't learn that if you don't have enough for what you want just whine really loud so the people around you will buy it for you.
    Now had they not had any money for a tree or if mom only had $10 and the cheapest tree was $25 then I would have offered the other $15. But they were getting a tree. They didn't have a "need" for a better tree. I may seem old fashioned or mean but I think it just taught those kids to be greedy.

    Another scenario was a mall Santa getting drunk at a bar when a mother and her little girl come in. Will the other patrons who know Santa is drunk get involved? This one is weird for me because I didn't think kids were allowed in areas that were serving drinks. As a mother if I walk into a bar with my little girl and I spot Santa sitting there, I'm going to assume he's been drinking and keep my daughter away from him or let her know right away that he's not the real Santa. That's what most of the patrons did.
    "You better watch your mouth sunshine."-Daryl Dixon

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