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Thread: HGTV Shows

  1. #2061
    Salty waywyrd's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    That house looked SO much better after they added the front porch (Good Bones). And I loved the starburst railings.

    I wonder what was up with the room full of bras?
    It was me. I let the dogs out.

  2. #2062
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    Good Bones this week the $4000 Parkhurst house, glad to see the ladies get a house for that amount, but it was funny to see Karen with the vision this time. Thankfully the restraint angel was visiting this week and the staged part of the home was very good this week even mimicking the green theme of last week. Maybe there should be a side by side photo of each room of both homes to see what is done right and what is over done. This week's home looked great and I am amazed at what the ladies can do and to see how knowledgeable they are about the way a house is constructed.
    No goat killers on my island.

  3. #2063
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    Desert Flippers liked what they did. Looks as if a lot of the houses built in the 1990's in Palm Springs have this chopped up style with walls that when removed really give over to the open concept great room with a vaulted ceiling and look amazing. I must admit for such a small home 1,500 sq ft they are making it look marvelous as well as creating a great outdoor space. Considering the temperature is mild enough to leave windows open 6 months out of the year there is a lot of outdoor living and even in the summer months the nights are cool enough to still enjoy the pool and yard.

    BTW another great kitchen and just extending a bit makes it appear huge. Luv the backsplash. Lindsey does pick out really good tile for the floors, kitchens, and bathrooms.
    No goat killers on my island.

  4. #2064
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    Flip or Flop Atlanta - I would have thought that the Corsini's would have made a better profit by demolishing the farmhouse and building a bigger building on that site.

    While the finished product looked nice for a starter home the idea they left an old septic tank in the back yard felt as if it would not last long and would become a problem for the new homeowner.

    Also for experienced flippers, builders, and real estate agents, the idea they didn't know about the septic tank, or that the windows were old and needed to be replaced came across so fake that I felt sorry for whomever bought that home.
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  5. #2065
    Salty waywyrd's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    They sure didn't make much on that one...I can't believe they spent 100K on a house in that shape. The land must have been worth a lot.

    And yes, they said the septic tank was barely big enough for two bedrooms. It should have been upgraded.
    It was me. I let the dogs out.

  6. #2066
    9/11/2001 NEVER FORGET. Bookworm Champion Eastcoastmom's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    Quote Originally Posted by waywyrd View Post
    They sure didn't make much on that one...I can't believe they spent 100K on a house in that shape. The land must have been worth a lot.

    And yes, they said the septic tank was barely big enough for two bedrooms. It should have been upgraded.
    Well, they did say the parcel was 1.7 acres, which was large for that area where the new construction homes were on small parcels. I didn't think 100K was too much considering the land size which perhaps in the future could be subdivided.

    What got me were how low the renovation costs were. 20K for a 12' x 20' addition? 20K here wouldn't even cover a moderate kitchen renovation. 4K to redo that main bath? IDK, the prices seem so cheap. Is labor that much cheaper in Atlanta? I would think materials would be more or about the same in price, wherever one might be, no? I was switching channels between this and Late night with Colbert so I somehow missed the reveal of the new bedrooms. Or did they not show them? I did like what they did to the rest of the home.

    Good thing they do a lot of flips per year b/c they made a very small profit on this one.

  7. #2067
    FORT Fogey nennie's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    Quote Originally Posted by Eastcoastmom View Post
    Well, they did say the parcel was 1.7 acres, which was large for that area where the new construction homes were on small parcels. I didn't think 100K was too much considering the land size which perhaps in the future could be subdivided.

    What got me were how low the renovation costs were. 20K for a 12' x 20' addition? 20K here wouldn't even cover a moderate kitchen renovation. 4K to redo that main bath? IDK, the prices seem so cheap. Is labor that much cheaper in Atlanta? I would think materials would be more or about the same in price, wherever one might be, no? I was switching channels between this and Late night with Colbert so I somehow missed the reveal of the new bedrooms. Or did they not show them? I did like what they did to the rest of the home.

    Good thing they do a lot of flips per year b/c they made a very small profit on this one.
    I think prices are higher in places like California, New York and along the east and west coasts. I know my friend in California just did a remodel and she says prices are exorbitant. They are from Texas and she says stuff is cheaper there. I know when I visited her I couldn't believe the prices of groceries out there.

    I have to believe that them doing 100+ flips a year most of them have to only be a lot of cosmetic. It takes a lot of time to do a flip unless you have huge crews working on them. Even that you have inspectors and all the other people you have to wait on to do their jobs. When you have plumbing, structural and electrical issued those those don't get taken care of overnight. I have rentals so I know what it entails to go in and work on them especially older homes.
    waywyrd and Eastcoastmom like this.
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  8. #2068
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    Tiny Paradise just finished airing 10 half hour episodes running from the end of June through the beginning of August. When the first Tiny Home shows aired I enjoyed them and then they home owners started to really irritate me especially the mom and dad with 4 kids who thought it was a good idea to live in 200 or less sq ft and then wanted a full size frig and bath and privacy so mom and dad could have fun in the bedroom. Anyway I started watching Tiny Paradise, what I like about this show is that the homes tend to be permanent structures, so have some really interesting ideas behind them such as the fiberglass house in Costa Rica made out of 7,000 plastic bottles. Many of the home owners are trying to live off the grid, use solar power, be green, be thoughtful of where they live and thoughtful of the materials they use, many try to recycle. The homeowners are also not trying to be ridiculous with the sizes, as the one I am watching right now is 400 sq ft but it is for a retired couple living in Costa Rica. I did notice the majority of homes are being built in either Hawaii, or Costa Rica with some in Colorado or Montana. The houses built in the warmer climes also have outdoor pools or baths, outdoor kitchens or dining areas. They have extended the living space outdoors which is something you can do in Mexico, and in Hawaii but not so much up North. Also the homeowners are either singles, young couples, or retirees. Folks practicing a minimal lifestyle or downsizing. The cost of the land is not mentioned but the homes themselves are at least $25,000 to last I saw $85,000.
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  9. #2069
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    The first episode turned me off (annoying people), but I might have to give it another try. I'm definitely interested in tiny PERMANENT structures rather than the gypsy hovel on wheels that you actually aren't allowed to put anywhere.
    Miss_Griss likes this.

  10. #2070
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: HGTV Shows

    Quote Originally Posted by Bearcata View Post
    Tiny Paradise just finished airing 10 half hour episodes running from the end of June through the beginning of August. When the first Tiny Home shows aired I enjoyed them and then they home owners started to really irritate me especially the mom and dad with 4 kids who thought it was a good idea to live in 200 or less sq ft and then wanted a full size frig and bath and privacy so mom and dad could have fun in the bedroom. Anyway I started watching Tiny Paradise, what I like about this show is that the homes tend to be permanent structures, so have some really interesting ideas behind them such as the fiberglass house in Costa Rica made out of 7,000 plastic bottles. Many of the home owners are trying to live off the grid, use solar power, be green, be thoughtful of where they live and thoughtful of the materials they use, many try to recycle. The homeowners are also not trying to be ridiculous with the sizes, as the one I am watching right now is 400 sq ft but it is for a retired couple living in Costa Rica. I did notice the majority of homes are being built in either Hawaii, or Costa Rica with some in Colorado or Montana. The houses built in the warmer climes also have outdoor pools or baths, outdoor kitchens or dining areas. They have extended the living space outdoors which is something you can do in Mexico, and in Hawaii but not so much up North. Also the homeowners are either singles, young couples, or retirees. Folks practicing a minimal lifestyle or downsizing. The cost of the land is not mentioned but the homes themselves are at least $25,000 to last I saw $85,000.
    Seems as if the last 4 to 5 episodes were folks building trailers and I have seen that enough that I am bored and uninterested in really watching. What was interesting is that many of the home owners also were pretty handy themselves and did a lot of the work. I do appreciate the craftmanship of it and was surprised overall to see that there are international companies that put together prefabricated tiny homes and ship them out. The one home crafted in Bali and shipped to Hawaii had beautiful craving. Seriously, every couple or individual seemed to be very independent and determined or has lived a minimal self sufficient lifestyle. I think you really need to to be able to live successfully in a tiny home and have a support system (family) that lets you part your trailer on their property. I sincerely hope the ones you are using electricity and water are paying the main homeowners for it. In other tiny home shows it was rather irritating and hypocritical of some on these younger folks saying they didn't want to live with mommy or daddy and wanted their own space but not pay a lot for it are living rent free on one of the parents or relatives property, so in a sense mommy and daddy are still supporting you while you claim independence.
    Miss_Griss likes this.
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