From the Ventura County Star:

Corey Feldman gets close to all kinds of 'reality'
By Dave Mason, mason@insidevc.com
January 5, 2003

Movie star Corey Feldman shows how much he misses his fiancee, Susie Sprague, when he's living in a house with other celebrities on The WB's "Surreal Life."

The reality series features Feldman interacting with fellow celebrities Emmanuel Lewis ("Webster"), Brande Roderick ("Baywatch Hawaii"), rapper M.C. Hammer, Jerri Manthey ("Survivor: Australia"), Gabrielle Carteris ("Beverly Hills 90210") and Motley Crue frontman Vince Neil. They lived together on Glen Campbell's former estate in the Hollywood Hills.

"The Surreal Life" premieres at 9 p.m. Thursday on The WB, Channel 5, and the wedding will occur in a later episode.

"It's 'The Osbournes' meets 'The Real World,' " Feldman said in a phone interview.

Actually, I've seen the first episode, and, maybe because they're used to being in front of the cameras, the actors appear more gracious toward one another than the people in other "reality" shows. They seem to be having genuine fun as they do things such as bring brownies to their not-so-famous neighbors or go shopping as other customers stare. M.C. Hammer and Lewis especially get along well, and Lewis still has his riotous laugh.

But you know, food is enough to stir up trouble.

The celebs get a little testy over things such as the reasons to become a vegetarian. And they clash over whether it's OK to eat sushi off a naked woman -- one of the surprises from the producers. (Most of the men objected to it; the women and Neil dug in, talking to the naked woman as they removed the sushi, which covered her like a bikini.)

In addition to "The Surreal Life," Feldman is busy with drama these days. He's guest-starring as a troubled man on the law drama "Guardian" at 9 p.m. Tuesday on CBS, Channel 2.

"I play a guy who's a former child actor who's kicked out of his house when his parents find out he's gay," Feldman said.

About playing a gay man, Feldman mused: "It had to be subtle. I'm going with a little bit of the mannerisms of a gay person, but I didn't want to be flamboyant. I have a lot of gay friends, and it's not predestined how they will act."

About playing a former child actor, Feldman chuckled. In real life, he's a former child actor who made his fame with the vampire movie "The Lost Boys" and other films such as "Stand By Me," "Gremlins" and "The Goonies." The movies during his adult career have included "My Life As A Troll" (2001) and "Maverick" (1994). He acted in the 1995 TV series "Dweebs."

Recently, Feldman recorded and released "Former Child Actor," a song he wrote with Rick Springfield. It pokes fun at the concept that "former child actors" are automatic has-beens.

"It's a tongue-in-cheek way of responding to the press labeling me as a former child actor, a former teen actor," Feldman said.

"I don't accept it at all. I refute it," Feldman said. "The only way for anyone to get past it is for me to acknowledge it."

And Feldman, a 31-year-old native of Reseda, is acknowledging his child acting career by playing himself in two upcoming movies, "Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star," starring David Spade in the title role, and "The Mayor of Sunset Strip."

Feldman also plays himself in a couple of independent ventures: "Bikini Bandits," a film that is a series of funny skits; and "Project Redlight," a spoof of Ben Affleck and Matt Damon's "Project Greenlight," the HBO series in which the stars advised a newcomer on directing a film.