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Thread: Lost - Season 2

  1. #3281
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qboots View Post
    I'd be surprised if it was anyone other than Stephen King. He's a big fan.
    Really? I think I might faint now. Actually, considering that he's a fan, I wouldn't be surprised. He's collaborated with TV shows he likes in the past: he wrote an underrated episode of X-Files in the late nineties, and he does like to experiment with alternate means of publication, using pseudonyms and so on. Thanks for getting my hopes up!

    Do you think the writer will be revealed, though?

    myrosiedog, a metafictional book is a book that selfconsciously deals with fiction and literature in one way or another. In this case, the book in question is a work of metafiction since it is a work of fiction within a fiction. Metafictional novels are not a genre per se as much as a device most commonly used in postmodern novels. Paul Auster has written several metafictional novels, as has Bret Easton Ellis.

    Hope my impromptu explanation made sense. And yeah, I am so buying this book!
    Last edited by geek the girl; 02-09-2006 at 01:35 PM.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  2. #3282
    FORT Fogey Ellen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qboots View Post
    Owl Creek Bridge.
    The full title of the short story is "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," written by Ambrose Bierce. It's required reading in most middle- or high-school American literature classes.

    Here's the synopsis from Wikipedia:

    When he is hanged the rope breaks and the main character falls into the water, from which he begins a journey back to his home. During his journey, he starts to feel some strange physiological events that ultimately end with a searing pain in his neck. It turns out that the man never escaped; he imagined the entire thing during the time between being pushed off the bridge and the noose finally breaking his neck.
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  3. #3283
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    Ever since it was reported a while back that there was going to be a fictional book published by a so-called passenger on Oceanic Flight 815 to tie in with LOST, I had to keep hoping that there wasn't a passenger who also made bobble-heads, or t-shirts, or coffee mugs or anything else which the producers could think up that might end up being cross-promotional for the show... I mean, if the book was more related to the action on the island, I'd be tempted to read it, but a book written by a fictional passenger? Too much fluff for me. Kind of like the flashbacks we are getting this season - which aren't telling us anything we need to know, and very little that we didn't already know, about the characters. I am so ready for them to start introducing us to the rest of the survivors!

    And GtG, the author is described as follows:
    "As part of the plan, Hyperion said it has commissioned a "well-known" mystery writer to anonymously adapt the fictitious manuscript into an actual, printed book it hopes will automatically appeal to the show's large and loyal following."
    So, if Stephen King falls under the category of "well-known mystery writer" you're in luck - although I always figured him more of a suspense/thriller/horror author more than a mystery writer, personally...

  4. #3284
    Go Bruins! Qboots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozzz View Post
    I mean, if the book was more related to the action on the island, I'd be tempted to read it, but a book written by a fictional passenger? Too much fluff for me.
    Well, aside from the fact that selling copies will make money, I think it's an attempt to make the whole "Lost" experience a bit more "real" for the avid fans. Just like Laura Palmer's Diary and the Access Guide to the town of Twin Peaks.

    Both of which I own of course.
    "I'm telling you - it's a madhouse out there. I feel like Charlton Heston waking up in the field and seeing the chimp on top of the pony." ~ Dennis Miller

  5. #3285
    HBK fan nilesgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozzz View Post
    Ever since it was reported a while back that there was going to be a fictional book published by a so-called passenger on Oceanic Flight 815 to tie in with LOST, I had to keep hoping that there wasn't a passenger who also made bobble-heads, or t-shirts, or coffee mugs or anything else which the producers could think up that might end up being cross-promotional for the show... I mean, if the book was more related to the action on the island, I'd be tempted to read it, but a book written by a fictional passenger? Too much fluff for me. Kind of like the flashbacks we are getting this season - which aren't telling us anything we need to know, and very little that we didn't already know, about the characters. I am so ready for them to start introducing us to the rest of the survivors!

    And GtG, the author is described as follows:
    "As part of the plan, Hyperion said it has commissioned a "well-known" mystery writer to anonymously adapt the fictitious manuscript into an actual, printed book it hopes will automatically appeal to the show's large and loyal following."
    So, if Stephen King falls under the category of "well-known mystery writer" you're in luck - although I always figured him more of a suspense/thriller/horror author more than a mystery writer, personally...
    I agree about SK. He's more of a horror author. John Grisham is a mystery writer, though he usually writes about lawers and law not P.I's. But who knows.
    Hurley: (holding up a Jesus statue) I don't know. I thought there might be a prowler or something.
    Mrs. Reyes: (grabbing the statue) Jesus Christ is not a weapon! - LOST "There's No Place Like Home Pt. 1

  6. #3286
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xjeff99 View Post
    That's very odd because how does she know about scott and steve? that part made me VERY suspicious of her (even more so now)

    My thoughts, too!

    Am so glad they will show the countdown next week. Husband says it will be the last frame of the ep and we will be left in suspense until the next one.
    I wouldn't be surprised.

    When Sam Toomey's wife told Hurley how Sam got the numbers, she said he got them from a longwave radio transmission in the Pacific. The radio last night was a shortwave radio, and Danielle's recording was heard playing on it. I had always assumed that she had changed the same recording that Sam and Leonard heard, but now it seems that the numbers came from two different sources of transmission; if so, how is that significant ?
    Or can a shortwave radio pick up a longwave transmission?
    Very low-frequency longwave transmissions penetrate sea water quite well, and the military uses them to communicate with submarines - I've been chewing on that one for awhile, since her mention of longwaves was so specific, and now they bring up shortwaves.
    Last edited by cricketeen; 02-09-2006 at 03:34 PM.
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  7. #3287
    Go Bruins! Qboots's Avatar
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    Did a bit of 'net surfing and found another possible candidate for ghost-writer. ABC/Hyperion has previously hired mystery writer Ridley Pearson to ghost-write a book called "The Diary of Ellen Rimbauer: My Life at Rose Red". It was a prequel to the 2002 Stephen King mini-series "Rose Red".

    And I know King is a horror writer, but he has written at least one mystery, and if they really want to keep his identity a secret they'd be silly to say it's been written by a well-known horror writer.

    Anyhoo.....the fictitious writer who died on flight #815 - Gary Troup - is an anagram for "Purgatory".
    "I'm telling you - it's a madhouse out there. I feel like Charlton Heston waking up in the field and seeing the chimp on top of the pony." ~ Dennis Miller

  8. #3288
    FORT Fogey Namaste's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qboots View Post

    Anyhoo.....the fictitious writer who died on flight #815 - Gary Troup - is an anagram for "Purgatory".

    Ahah, never would have seen that, good job Qboots.
    Adversity reveals genius. -Horace

  9. #3289
    Up too late... Chickngirl's Avatar
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    Susie-
    Thanks for the link.
    I need a flow chart for all of this!!

    I used to got to a board Lost-Forum.com, but I quit b/c the people there can be incredibly rude/mean to newbies (and each other!). FORT is the nicest board, evah! So this is the only place now I check for my "Lost" discussions.

    K
    "The older you get, the more rules they are going to try and get you to follow. You just gotta keep on livin', man. L-I-V-I-N." Wooderson, "Dazed & Confused"

  10. #3290
    FORT Fogey Florimel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qboots View Post
    Anyhoo.....the fictitious writer who died on flight #815 - Gary Troup - is an anagram for "Purgatory".
    Drat! I was just going to post that, Qboots. You beat me it too, as usual.

    I just cannot hate Charlie. Maybe it's the mom in me or maybe I look at Dom and still see Meriadoc, but I see him as so wanting to be needed by someone and whenever he tries, it either goes wrong or someone else helps it to go wrong. Kind of like, Shannon, IMO. After having been told so often that she was useless, she behaved in kind. After all, as far as we know, Locke was wrong; Charlie did not take drugs again. Another good actor who can speak volumes with his face alone.

    As, of course, can John Holloway, who makes you want to know more about why he is the way he is. That's the way to play a villainous character. I certainly did not believe him when he told Charlie that he had never a done a good thing in his life. We have already seen him do several good things, both on the island and in flashback.

    I am guessing that something bad may have happened to Cassidy as a result of her involvement with Sawyer, adding one more reason he wants to be hated. That way, no one else will get close to him and be hurt or killed because of him. Just specualtion, of course.

    I very much enjoyed almost every moment of this episode.
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