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  1. #491
    FORT Fan Miss Understood's Avatar
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    This is true and unless John wants out he is way to popular. In the comic there was a Lana right? How far in the comic book does she go? And when does his love for Lois start?

  2. #492
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    I certainly hope its not Clhoe who is going to die. I've always liked her more than Lana. Just as in real life the hero falls for the beautiful and unattainable girl, while the girl next door and hero's buddy is totally unwanted by the hero. Lana just seems too high maintainance--Clark can't even tell her the truth about himself!

  3. #493
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss Understood
    This is true and unless John wants out he is way to popular. In the comic there was a Lana right? How far in the comic book does she go? And when does his love for Lois start?
    The way I recall it, and my reading of Superman comics ended before he got "dark", Superman had Lois and Superboy had Lana, and maybe I recall once a "crossover" where the adult Clark went home to Smallville and kind of ran into the adult Lana. Otherwise they were separate stories/comic books. I don't recall Lois and Lana being cousins and Lana wasn't nearly as well developed in terms of backstory as Lana in the TV show. Since Superboy was an ongoing comic then I never found out how his romance with her ended...just assumed it died a natural death when he went away to college and went looking for work later. Since part of the Superman issue with Lois was that he couldn't tell her about his true self (for years) one assumed he never told Lana. Of course I don't recall him having a male friend as Superboy (Pete) who knew the truth, which others imply was in the comics, so I probably missed a lot. For that matter I don't recall a young Lex in the comics.
    I agree about Chloe, cablejockey, but aside from Lana's looks guess he has the dead parents thing in common with her. Chloe is just way too sane and upfront for him, no mysterious sadness. Although she does seem to only have a dad, I forget why.
    But to be fair they are constrained by the comics, the movies, previous TV shows, etc. in how far they can go.

  4. #494
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    10/27 vampire episode

    Loved all the references to Buffy and vampires. The best line is James Marsters telling Clark that they is no such thing as a vampire. Marsters amazes me, If I didn't know he had played Spike I would never have recognized him. His accent and demeanor are incredible. Its nice to see an actor who can act. Lana was also great in her metamorphosizes to vampire. I also liked the little reference to Terminator II when the Professor spiked the armed guard. Well, I guess that was a double ref to both Buffy and Terminator.

  5. #495
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearcata
    Loved all the references to Buffy and vampires. The best line is James Marsters telling Clark that they is no such thing as a vampire. Marsters amazes me, If I didn't know he had played Spike I would never have recognized him. His accent and demeanor are incredible. Its nice to see an actor who can act. Lana was also great in her metamorphosizes to vampire. I also liked the little reference to Terminator II when the Professor spiked the armed guard. Well, I guess that was a double ref to both Buffy and Terminator.
    Marsters is indeed incredible...I had heard he would be on but had forgotten. Had watched part of my Smallville tape, just the intro, and took a break to check on things on FORT and saw your post. Went back and started watching again, and it was probably 10 minutes later when I realized what part he was playing! It was some angle with the sun behind him so there was a silloutte and I recognized him. But not the voice, nothing! Wow. And I was a huge Spike fan.

  6. #496
    FORT Newbie Pierre Bernard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss Understood
    This is true and unless John wants out he is way to popular. In the comic there was a Lana right? How far in the comic book does she go? And when does his love for Lois start?

    I read somewhere on the net that Lana eventually marries Pete in the comics. Pete was portrayed as a skinny blonde kid.

    I don't think Lois ever visited Smallville or knew Clark before his Daily Planet days.

  7. #497
    FORT Newbie Pierre Bernard's Avatar
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    Who's Who in the Superman Comics
    Lana Lang
    Friend of Superman. Lana grew up near Smallville and met Clark Kent in elementary school. They quickly became close friends, and Lana fell in love with Clark. Her thoughts of marriage ended in high school one night, however, when Clark revealed he had remarkable super powers and would be leaving Smallville. After Superman's debut, Lex Luthor had Lana kidnapped and interrogated in an attempt to learn Superman's secret identity, but Lana never cracked. Lana's connection with Superman has also caused her to be brainwashed by Manhunter androids, and injured during a fight between Superman and Matrix in Smallville. Lana always hoped there was a chance that Clark would marry her, but eventually gave up when Clark told her he loved Lois Lane. Lana persuaded Lois Lane that Clark loved her when Lois had doubts. Eventually, Lana sold her family's farm in Smallville and moved to Washington D.C where she has married another childhood friend of Clark Kent, Pete Ross. After Ross lost his senate position, the couple returned to Smallville. Lana was one of Lois' bridesmaids at Lois and Clark's wedding. Later, Lana was pregnant, unknown to Clark, and when she was involved in a car accident, the baby was born 2 months pre-mature. She called Clark to ask him if he could help save her baby. As Superman, he was taking the infant to another hospital when Doomsday, inhabited by Brainiac's mind, attacked him. He took the child, intending to grow a more controllable Doomsday from his tiny body. Superman and the child's father, Pete Ross, rescued the infant and Brainiac's technology had made him healthy. Lana and Pete named him Clark Peter Ross (Superman: The Doomsday Wars #1-3).
    Lana took a back seat to the things going on around her when Lex Luthor chose her husband as vice president. Even knowing how twisted and evil Luthor was, her devotion to Clark Kent still holds true. She doesn't reveal the trials Luthor put her through to keep Clark's secret from Pete.

    When Luthor fell, Pete ascended briefly to the presidency, and when he did, Lana decided to end their relationship for reasons that have not yet been revealed. She moved back toward Clark and tried to seduce him, ultimately failing. Currently, she remains in a limbo of a sort, trying to figure out what to do with her life.

    First Appearance: MOS #1 (July 1986)

  8. #498
    FORT Newbie Pierre Bernard's Avatar
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    Lois Lane
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
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    Lois Lane

    Lois Lane. Art by John Byrne.

    Publisher DC Comics
    First appearance Action Comics #1 (1938)
    Created by =Jerry Siegel & Joe Shuster

    Statistics
    Full Name Lois Joanne Lane
    Status Active
    Supporting Character of Superman
    Notable relatives Clark Kent (Superman, husband), Sam Lane (father, deceased), Ella Lane (mother), Lucy Lane (sister), Ron Troupe (brother-in-law), Sam Troupe (nephew)

    Lois Lane is a fictional character who appears in the Superman stories produced by DC Comics. She is Superman's chief romantic interest and a reporter for the Metropolis newspaper, the Daily Planet. Lois debuted in Action Comics #1 (1938); her physical appearance was originally based on a model hired by Siegel and Shuster named Joanne Carter. Traditionally, Lois has black hair, though for a period from the late 1980s through the late 1990s, Lois was depicted with brown hair in the comics.

    Aspects of Lois' personality have varied over the years (depending on the comic writers' handling of the character and American social attitudes toward women at the time), but in most incarnations she has been depicted as a strongly determined, strong-willed person, whether it involves beating her rival reporter Clark Kent to a story or (in what became a trademark of 1950s and 1960s era Superman stories) proving to others her suspicion that her fellow reporter Clark Kent was in reality Superman. She also traditionally had a cool attitude toward Clark, who in her view paled in comparison to his superalter ego. At times the character has been portrayed as a damsel in distress.

    Lois is regarded as attractive, but not in the exaggerated "supermodel" sense often seen in superhero comics' depictions of women. Her appearance has varied over the years, depending either on current fashion or (especially more recently) the way she's depicted in contemporary media adaptations; for instance, in the mid-1990s, when Lois and Clark began airing, Lois received a hair cut that made her look more like Teri Hatcher, and her eyes were typically violet to match the Lois of the television cartoon Superman: The Animated Series after that show began airing.

    Lois is the daughter of Sam and Ella Lane. In the earlier comics, her parents were farmers in a town called Pittsdale; the modern comics, however, depict Sam as a retired soldier, and Lois as a former "army brat," with Lois having been trained by her father in areas such as hand-to-hand combat and the use of firearms. Lois also has one younger sibling, her sister Lucy Lane.

    In the current comics, Lois is married to Clark Kent (and aware of his secret identity), but has kept her maiden name for professional purposes.

    Lois is one of several Superman characters with the initials "LL", including Lex Luthor, Lana Lang, Letitia Lerner and Lori Lemaris (a mermaid).

    Contents [hide]
    1 History
    1.1 Golden Age
    1.2 Silver Age
    1.3 Modern Age
    2 Trivia
    3 In other media
    4 External links



    [edit]
    History
    The comics have seen several incarnations of Lois Lane over the decades.

    [edit]
    Golden Age

    Cover to Superman #27, by Wayne Boring.In the earliest Golden Age comics, Lois was featured as an aggressive, career-minded reporter for the Daily Star (the paper's name was changed to the Daily Planet in the early 1940s), who, after Clark Kent joined the paper and Superman debuted around the same time, found herself attracted to Superman, but displeased with her new journalistic competition in the form of Kent. Starting in the late 1940s or early 1950s comics, Lois began to suspect that Clark Kent was Superman, and started to make various attempts at uncovering his secret identity, all of which backfired (usually thanks to Superman's efforts).

    In the Golden Age comics, Lois also had a niece named Susie Tompkins, whose main trait was getting into trouble by telling exaggerated tall tales and fibs to adults. Susie's last appearance was in 1955; subsequent comics presented Lois' only sibling, Lucy, as single and childless.

    After DC instituted its multiverse system in the early 1960s for organizing its continuity, it was deemed that the Lois of the Golden Age comics (i.e., comics published from 1938 through the early 1950s) lived on the parallel world of "Earth-Two" versus the then-mainstream (Silver Age) universe of "Earth-One." In 1978's Action Comics #484, it was revealed that sometime in the 1950s, the Earth-Two Lois became infatuated with Clark Kent after the latter lost his memory of his superheroic identity (thanks to a spell cast by the old Justice Society of America enemy the Wizard), with the result of Clark acting more aggressive and extroverted. Clark and Lois began to date each other, and were soon married; however, during the honeymoon, Lois discovered that Clark was indeed Superman, and after recruiting the aid of the Wizard, restored Clark's memory. A series of stories in the 1970s and 1980s titled "Mr. and Mrs. Superman" presented the further adventures of the now-married Lois and Clark.

    During the Crisis on Infinite Earths miniseries, the Earth-Two Lois Lane was seen for the last time, as she, the Earth-Two Superman, and a version of Superboy from Earth-Prime are taken by Earth-Three's Alexander Luthor into a paradise-like dimension at the end of the story (after all the parallel Earths, including Earth-Two, had been eliminated in favor of just one Earth), after which this version of Lois was (seemingly) permanently discarded from DC's continuity.

    Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
    In 2005's Infinite Crisis miniseries, it was revealed that the Earth-Two Lois Lane, along with Superboy, Alexander Luthor and Superman, have been watching the events of the post-Crisis DC Universe from their pocket dimension.

    [edit]
    Silver Age

    Lois and Lana Lang acquire super powers and fight each other for Superman's love in Superman's Girlfriend, Lois Lane #21. Art by Kurt Schaffenberger.As the audience for comic books began gravitating towards young boys in the mid-to-late 1950s, the Superman stories shifted in focus more toward science fiction-inspired plots involving aliens, fantasy creatures and bizarre, often contrived, plots. Lois's main interests in various late 1950s and 1960s stories became vying with her rival Lana Lang for Superman's affections, attempting to prove Clark Kent and Superman were one and the same, and tricking or otherwise forcing Superman into marriage. This change in Lois' personality from her earlier 1940s self might also be a result of American society's attitudes toward women and their societal roles in the 1950s.

    Lois became more and more popular during this decade, and after a one-shot story in 1957 in DC's title Showcase, Lois was given her own comic, titled Superman's Girlfriend, Lois Lane. Most of the stories in this title placed a greater emphasis on Lois' romance with Superman, and were drawn by DC comic artist Kurt Schaffenberger; indeed, Schaffenberger's rendition of Lois became cited by many as the "definitive" version of Lois, and he was often asked to redraw Superman comic artist Curt Swan's renditions of Lois and Lana by Superman comic editor Mort Weisinger.

    By the end of the sixties, as attitudes toward women's role in American society began to change, Lois did as well. 1970s stories featuring Lois depicted her as being fully capable of taking care of herself, engaged in more solo adventures without Superman being involved, and her being much less interested in things such as discovering Superman's secret identity. For example, in her solo stories in Superman Family (an anthology title started in the mid-1970s from the merging/cancellation of several previous titles, including Superman's Girlfriend, Lois Lane and Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen), Lois regularly battled criminals in her investigations and defeated them with quick wits and considerable skill in martial arts.

    After the 1985-1986 miniseries "Crisis on Infinite Earths", writer and artist John Byrne was hired to revise the Superman comics, thus eliminating the Silver Age version of Lois from continuity; before this happened, a final non-canonical "imaginary story" was written by writer Alan Moore, meant as a send-off for the "pre-Crisis" versions of the characters, including Lois.

    [edit]
    Modern Age

    Lois Lane with Superman in the "For Tomorrow" storyline. Art by Jim Lee.Lois underwent a character alteration beginning with John Byrne's Man of Steel miniseries, which was designed to rewrite Superman's origin from scratch. In the modern version of events, Lois was a tough-as-nails reporter who rarely needed rescuing. She was depicted as strong, opinionated, yet sensitive.

    Another major change made was that Lois did not fall head over heels in love with Superman. A reason for this was because the nature of the Superman/Clark Kent relationship had changed; whereas before Superman was his main identity and Clark Kent was a disguise, now he was primarily considered to be Clark Kent, with Superman being the disguise. After some time, Lois and Clark began dating. In the early 1990s, they became engaged and Clark revealed to Lois the secret of his dual life.

    DC had planned on Lois and Clark being married in 1993's Superman #75. However, with the then-upcoming television show Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, DC decided they did not want to have the two married in the comics and not married on TV (as it turned out, they desired to have the wedding occur simultaneously in both the comics and the television program). Partially as a result of this, Superman was killed in Superman #75 instead, dying in Lois's arms after a battle royal with the monster Doomsday. After a period of time, Superman returned to life, and both he and Lois resumed their relationship, though not without a few problems occurring (such as a brief reappearance of Clark's former college girlfriend, Lori Lemaris).

    In 1996, coinciding with the Lois and Clark television program, Lois and Clark were finally wed in the one-shot special Superman: The Wedding Album, which featured the work of nearly every then-living artist who had ever worked on Superman. The Wedding Album itself, however, was forced to spend part of its opening pages accommodating and reconciling the then-current comic storyline of Lois and Clark having broken off their engagement (the television program's producers had failed to provide adequate lead time for the Superman comics' writers).

    Today, Lois lives with Clark in an apartment at 1938 Sullivan Lane in Metropolis.

    [edit]
    Trivia
    Lois once owned a cat named Elroy.
    There is a street in the Metro Detroit area (specifically, the city of Southfield) called "Lois Lane".
    During the years (1942-1984) that Editora Brasil-América (EBAL) published the Brazilian versions of Superman comics, Lois Lane's was translated to "Miriam Lane" and later to "Miriam Lois Lane".
    [edit]
    In other media

    Noel Neill as Lois Lane on The Adventures of SupermanActress Rollie Bester originated the role of Lois Lane for a radio series with Bud Collyer as Superman in the 1940s. Other actresses to lend their voice to the character were Helen Choate and Joan Alexander. Joan Alexander would also voice the character for a series of Superman theatrical cartoons for Fleischer Studios (1941-1943) as well as a 1960s animated television series.

    Margot Kidder as Lois Lane in the Superman moviesActress Noel Neill played Lois Lane in more venues and instances than any other actress. She played the role in the 1948 and 1950 Saturday movie serials with Kirk Alyn playing Clark Kent/Superman. She continued to play the role in the Adventures of Superman television program opposite George Reeves and had a cameo in the 1978 film Superman as Lois Lane's mother. She was also a guest star in The Adventures of Superboy alongside Jack Larson (Jimmy Olsen) as an office worker at the Bureau for Extra-Normal Matters. She also has a role in the upcoming Bryan Singer-directed film Superman Returns.
    Actress Phyllis Coates played Lois Lane in the first season of the Adventures of Superman television program. She also portrayed the mother of Lois Lane in the first season of the 1990s television program Lois and Clark.
    Actress Patricia Marand played Lois Lane in Broadway music play It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's a Superman in 1966. For her performance she was nominated for Broadway's 1966 Tony Award as Best Supporting or Featured Actress (Musical).

    Teri Hatcher as Lois Lane on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of SupermanActress Margot Kidder played Lois Lane against Christopher Reeve's Clark Kent in the 1970s and 1980s films Superman, Superman II, Superman III and Superman IV: The Quest For Peace. Her role in Superman III was greatly reduced, however, due to a conflict with the producers of the film. She also appeared briefly in two episodes of the television program Smallville as Dr. Bridgette Crosby, an emissary of Dr. Swann (played by Christopher Reeve).

    Erica Durance as Lois Lane on SmallvilleActress Teri Hatcher played Lois Lane on the ABC television series Lois and Clark.
    Actress Dana Delany voiced Lois Lane (in the Superman animated television series in the 1990s) and in the character's subsequent appearances on Justice League and its successor Justice League Unlimited.
    On the 2000s WB series Smallville, Erica Durance plays a young Lois Lane who came to Smallville to investigate the apparent death of her cousin, Chloe Sullivan. After teaming up with Clark Kent to find her cousin, she returned for several guest start apperances in season four before signing to return for half the episodes of season five. This version of Lois is not interested journalism as a career at all. Additionally, Lois Lane failed high school, was kicked out of college, and has worked in Lana Lang's coffee shop for almost a year - a job given to her by Martha Kent, the manager. She's also been romantically linked to Aquaman. This lack of traditional Lois Lane accomplishments has lead many fans to wonder if her cousin Chloe Sullivan (played by Allison Mack) who has already tried to use 'Lois Lane' as a pen name and is currently employeed at the Daily Planet is, in fact, to be revealed as the iconic Lois before the series ends.

    Kate Bosworth as Lois Lane in Superman ReturnsActress Kate Bosworth has been cast to play Lois Lane in the upcoming Bryan Singer-directed film Superman Returns.
    [edit]
    External links
    I Love Lois (Lane)
    Lois Lane Index - her many incarnations
    Supermanica: Lois Lane Supermanica entry on the Pre-Crisis Lois Lane
    Lois Lane - information from the 90s animated series
    Silver Age Lois Lane Annuals - cover gallery
    SUPERMAN'S GIRL FRIEND LOIS LANE

    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lois_Lane"
    Categories: Superman supporting characters | DC Comics titles | Fictional reporters

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  9. #499
    FORT Newbie Pierre Bernard's Avatar
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    You are responsible for all of this on the exam!

  10. #500
    PWS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pierre Bernard
    You are responsible for all of this on the exam!
    So true!

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