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Thread: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

  1. #161
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Buddy Holly has left us, but new & previously recorded music continues to be released. This one first charted at #82 on Feb. 23, 1959. Despite the unfortunate title, considering the circumstances, the song will do pretty well.


    It Doesn’t Matter Anymore – Buddy Holly

    This was the 1st posthumous single released after the plane crash. It gets to #13 & stays around for 14 weeks. It was also a #1 single in the UK. This wasn’t the last charting single for Buddy, but it was his final trip into the Top 40. The song was written by Paul Anka. Linda Rondstadt charts with the song in 1975 but she won’t get this high.

    This was recorded in mid-October 1958 in New York City. Paul Anka wrote it specifically for Holly. He donated his royalties from the song to Holly's wife. He said: "'It Doesn't Matter Anymore' has a tragic irony about it now, but at least it will help look after Buddy Holly's family. I'm giving my composer's royalty to his widow - it's the least I can do."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOTv9jY4X5E

    Keep in mind that at this time of his life Paul Anka was still just 18.
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  2. #162
    FORT Fogey Miss Scarlet's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Nice song. I remember this one.
    For a little extra fun, on the link, click on It's So Easy on the right.
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    "Success is getting what you want; Happiness is wanting what you get."

  3. #163
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Sometimes a good song is accompanied by a good story behind it. This is one of those times, I think. The song debuted at #91 on the Chart dated March 2, 1959.

    It’s Late – Ricky Nelson

    This one will stick around for 13 weeks & it gets all the way to #9. Dorsey Burnette wrote the song & this was the only version to chart. The song hits #3 in the UK & #28 in Australia.

    The career of Dorsey Burnette goes back to 1956 when he & his brother along with lead guitar player Paul Burlison formed a group called The Rock & Roll Trio in NYC. The group won the Ted Mack Amateur Hour competition 3 weeks in a row which lead to a recording contract.

    After many fits & starts & arguments & band breakups the brothers eventually moved to LA. New group member Joe Campbell bought a copy of “A Map To The Stars” which showed the location of teen idol Ricky Nelson's home. In an effort to get their songs to him, the Burnettes and Campbell decided to sit on the steps of the star’s home until they could get a meeting with him. This persistence worked and Nelson was impressed with their work, enough so that he recorded "Believe What You Say", "It's Late" and "Waitin' In School", among others. Other artists on Nelson's label, Imperial Records, such as Roy Brown, who covered the brothers' "Hip Shakin' Baby", benefited from their songwriting abilities and this led to them signing a recording contract with Imperial.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFsH07Fenfw

    I reckon if this approach was taken today, there would be jails full of trespassers.
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  4. #164
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    In 1959 there were 15 singles that went all the way to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. Six of those 15 came from artists making their debut. This was one of those 6. The song first charted at #55 on March 9.

    Come Softly To Me – The Fleetwoods

    This song will eventually chart 3 different times but none will be as big as this one. This version spends 4 weeks at #1 & comes in as the 7th biggest single of the year. The song was written by group members Gretchen Christopher, Barbara Ellis & Gary Troxel. The song hits #1 in Canada & #6 in the UK.

    They will have 9 Top 40 hits & 2 of them go to #1. They will also place at the 10th biggest debut act for the year.

    This song started when Fleetwoods members Gary Troxel and Gretchen Christopher were waiting for a lift home from high school by her mother. Troxel started humming "Dum dum, domby doo wha..." and Gretchen noticed that it was the same chord progression that she used in a song that she had just finished writing, "Come Softly." She asked him to slow his tempo, then sang her song atop Troxel's humming. They took it to Gretchen's singing partner Barbara Ellis, who liked it, and the trio formed Two Girls and a Guy (later changed to The Fleetwoods because they all lived in the same phone code, Fleetwood) . Recording the song at home, the group sang it a cappella with the rhythmic shaking of Troxel's car keys. The tape was then sent to Los Angeles where the sparse instrumental accompaniment was added, including an acoustic guitar played by Bonnie Guitar.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgJwm9erBaQ

    The girls in the group had both just turned 20 (they were born 9 days apart in February 1939), Gary Troxel was still 19.
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  5. #165
    FORT Fogey Miss Scarlet's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    I don't remember that one in the least, but it's a nice song from back in the day when singers could sing & carry a nice tune. They didn't need all the studio tricks & noise to sound good.
    As to the Fleetwood name, I remember back when phone numbers all had those name codes at the beginning instead of just numbers. Our was Glendale, abbreviated as GL, later as 4-5 - as the letters/numbers appear on the dial pad. We didn't live near anything or any place named Glendale. That alone was a blast from the past for me.
    razorbacker likes this.
    "Success is getting what you want; Happiness is wanting what you get."

  6. #166
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    I don't remember what our phone exchange was back in the day, but I do remember sneaking a listen in on the party line once in a while.

  7. #167
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Here is a first single from a guy that will go on to have a pretty good career, but the really true story behind him is the label he is signed to & what that label becomes. The song first charted on March 16, 1959 & debuted at #98:

    Come To Me – Marv Johnson

    Marv is able to get this song to #30. Marv co – wrote this one with Berry Gordy. The song hits #6 on the R&B Charts. This was the 1st of 4 Top 40 hits for Marv & his very first charting single as well.

    It was while performing at a carnival in Michigan that Marv was noticed by Berry Gordy, who was looking to sign acts into his fledgling company, Tamla Records, which he named after the Debbie Reynolds hit, "Tammy". Originally the label was Tammy Records. This was the very first hit single on the new Tamla Label even though it was nationally distributed by United Artists.

    And so, Marv was also the first artist to join what would become the Motown roster of artists.

    The song includes future Funk Brothers members James Jamerson on Bass & Benny Benjamin on drums.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u01a0_yDZxE

    Now not only is Motown beginning to peak it's head out of hiding, but what will become The Funk Brothers have begun to play on hit records, of which there will be many, many in the future.

  8. #168
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    I seem to be an audience of one, but maybe someone will like this one.

    The song debuted at #100 on the chart dated April 13, 1959:

    Kansas City – Wilbert Harrison

    This song will chart 4 times in 1959, once in 1964 & again in 1967, but this was the only version to hit the Top 20. It is going all the way to #1 & it will spend 2 weeks there. It is yet another hit that was written by Leiber & Stoller & this version of the song is in the Grammy Hall Of Fame. This was the 1st charting single for Wilbert & it was also the 1st of just 2 Top 40 hits. He won’t hit the Top 40 again until 1970. This has to be one of the few songs to debut at 100 & go to the top.

    Wilbert was an R&B Vocalist out of Charlotte, N.C. He was inducted into the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame in 2009. He passed away in a nursing home of a stroke at the age of 65.

    Leiber, the lyricist in the duo, wanted to write a song like Count Basie's "Going To Chicago Blues," where Basie takes off for Chicago and leaves his woman behind. Leiber came up with a scenario where a woman is driving the singer crazy ("Well, if I don't leave that woman I know I'm gonna die"), so he heads for Kansas City, looking to find some of the "crazy little women" they have there.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UonBS_mvW-E

    Here is a bit of an interesting factoid. The song that hit #1 just before this one was called The Happy Organ by Dave "Baby" Cortez. The guy that played lead guitar on that single was named Jimmy Spruill. Jimmy Spruill also plays the lead guitar on Kansas City for Wilbert. So he had back to back #1 hits as a session player.

  9. #169
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Perhaps I'm just a die hard in thinking that maybe someone other than me will eventually be interested in some of these songs, but it hasn't happened very often. So, I'll try again & perhaps give up...

    Anyway, all 3 of these song first hit the Billboard Hot 100 on June 1st 1959 & they were some pretty important singles....I Think!

    This one debuted at #98:

    There Goes My Baby – The Drifters

    This single goes all the way to #2, and #1 on the R&B Chart. It was written by Benjamin Nelson (Ben E. King), Lover Patterson & George Tredwell (the manager of the group) & this version is also in The Grammy Hall Of Fame.

    Even though these guys had been around since the early 50’s this was their 1st Top 40 hit single in the Rock Era. They were originally formed to serve as a backing group for Clyde McPhatter (of Billy Ward and his Dominoes) in 1953. According to Rolling Stone magazine, the Drifters were the least stable of the great vocal groups, as they were low-paid musicians hired by George Treadwell, who owned the Drifters name. There have been 60 vocalists in the history of the Drifters.

    The recording was produced by Leiber & Stoller. This was a very chaotic recording, with the tympani out of tune and Ben E. King's vocals coming in too soon at the beginning. With all the instrumentation going on, Leiber said that the first time he heard it on the radio, he thought he was picking up two stations.

    This production anarchy didn't sit well with Jerry Wexler at Atlantic Records, which was The Drifters' label, and the song marked the first dark cloud on the horizon between Leiber and Stoller and the label. As told in Hound Dog: The Leiber & Stoller Autobiography, Wexler hated the song as soon as he heard it, saying, "I'd never release s--t like this. It's dog meat! You're wasting our money on an overpriced production that sounds like a radio caught between two stations. Jerry Wexler was later caught in an audit showing that he owed Leiber and Stoller $18,000. He welshed.

    This was the song that introduced “strings” to rock arrangements.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehFWRG5gHyI

    This one debuted at #60:

    I Only Have Eyes For You – The Flamingos

    This is the 1st & most popular version of this song to chart. It will get to #11 for these folks, this version is in The Grammy Hall Of Fame. The song will hit #3 on the R&B Chart becoming their biggest single over there as well. The song was written for the Busby Berkeley movie musical Dames in 1934, where it was introduced by Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler. Ben Selvin recorded it that same year and landed at #2 on the charts.

    This was the 1st of just 2 Top 40 hits for this R&B group out of Chicago. Their Top 40 success lasts only until May of 1960, but they will continue to do well on the R&B Charts for many years to come.

    The Flamingos' version was arranged and co-produced by Terry "Buzzy" Johnson, a Baltimore native who joined the group as a first tenor in 1956. Fellow Flamingo Nate Nelson encouraged him to go crazy with the song, but he couldn't figure out what to do with it. All he knew was the other versions were way too vanilla for his taste. The answer finally came to him in a dream. He told Sound on Sound:

    "I was laying down in my room with the guitar on my chest, playing around with the chords, but no matter what I tried it just didn't fit. Finally, it was about 12 or one in the morning, and I was so tired that I fell asleep, and in my dream I heard 'I Only Have Eyes For You' just the way it came out on our record. I heard the 'doo-bop sh-bop' [backing vocals], I heard the way the harmony would sound - I heard the harmony so clear, and I heard the structure of the chords. As soon as I woke up, I grabbed the guitar off my chest and it was like God put my fingers just where they were supposed to be. I played those chords and I heard the harmonies, and so I called the guys. I woke them all up and I said, 'Come over to my room right now! I've got 'I Only Have Eyes For You'!'

    They were like, 'Are you crazy? It's almost four o'clock!' and I said, 'I need you all now, otherwise I may not be able to remember.' So they came to my room, all of them grumbling, and when they heard me do it they looked at me like, 'What the hell is this?' They laughed at me: 'What's 'doo-bop sh-bop, goo-bop sh-bop, boo-bop sh-bop, loo-bop sh-bop, shoo-bop sh-bop"?' You see, although in my dream it was 'doo-bop sh-bop', I had everybody doing a different thing, changing things around to make sure no one could really pick out what we were saying."
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrzusdilnKQ

    And this one debuted at #52:

    Lonely Boy – Paul Anka

    Paul wrote this song it is going to go all the way to #1, sit there for 4 weeks & land as the 6th biggest single of the year. The song hits #6 on the R&B Chart, 8 in Germany, 3 in the UK & 2 in Italy. He is still a month away from his 18th birthday at this point.

    This was the 2nd of his 3 #1 hit singles & with a 4 week run, it is also going to be the biggest hit of his career. Paul sang the song in a movie called Girls Town in which he co – starred with Mamie Van Doren.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKcCaCgMLBE

    There was also a debut single from a pair of brothers that charted on the same week, that I'd almost guarantee no one will have realized they went back that far but I'll post this one as well, because it is a pretty good song, their history is interestiong & they will now disappear for the next 13 years.

    The song debuted at #90:

    Cherrystone – The Addrisi Brothers

    This one stays on the chart for 6 weeks & climbs to #62. The Brothers wrote the song themselves.

    Brothers Don & Dick were from Winthrop Mass. This was their very 1st chart hit but try as they might they have no other hit singles on any chart at all throughout the 60’s & won’t have a Top 40 hit single until 1972.

    They certainly have an interesting history, if not a successful one. They were a part of their families acrobatic group, The Flying Addrisis. They were discovered as singers by Lenny Bruce & moved to California to pursue that course. They tried out for The Mickey Mouse Club, but didn’t make the cut. They recorded for multiple labels to almost no success at all & so decided to turn their craft to song writing instead. Perhaps their biggest success as writers was when the Association hit #2 in 1967 with the song Never My Love.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIVKLixvptM

    Hope these trip some memories for someone.....anyone....
    Miss Scarlet likes this.

  10. #170
    Animals over People :) Fanny Mare's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Quote Originally Posted by razorbacker View Post
    Perhaps I'm just a die hard in thinking that maybe someone other than me will eventually be interested in some of these songs, but it hasn't happened very often. So, I'll try again & perhaps give up...

    Anyway, all 3 of these song first hit the Billboard Hot 100 on June 1st 1959 & they were some pretty important singles....I Think!

    This one debuted at #98:

    There Goes My Baby – The Drifters

    This single goes all the way to #2, and #1 on the R&B Chart. It was written by Benjamin Nelson (Ben E. King), Lover Patterson & George Tredwell (the manager of the group) & this version is also in The Grammy Hall Of Fame.

    Even though these guys had been around since the early 50’s this was their 1st Top 40 hit single in the Rock Era. They were originally formed to serve as a backing group for Clyde McPhatter (of Billy Ward and his Dominoes) in 1953. According to Rolling Stone magazine, the Drifters were the least stable of the great vocal groups, as they were low-paid musicians hired by George Treadwell, who owned the Drifters name. There have been 60 vocalists in the history of the Drifters.

    The recording was produced by Leiber & Stoller. This was a very chaotic recording, with the tympani out of tune and Ben E. King's vocals coming in too soon at the beginning. With all the instrumentation going on, Leiber said that the first time he heard it on the radio, he thought he was picking up two stations.

    This production anarchy didn't sit well with Jerry Wexler at Atlantic Records, which was The Drifters' label, and the song marked the first dark cloud on the horizon between Leiber and Stoller and the label. As told in Hound Dog: The Leiber & Stoller Autobiography, Wexler hated the song as soon as he heard it, saying, "I'd never release s--t like this. It's dog meat! You're wasting our money on an overpriced production that sounds like a radio caught between two stations. Jerry Wexler was later caught in an audit showing that he owed Leiber and Stoller $18,000. He welshed.

    This was the song that introduced “strings” to rock arrangements.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehFWRG5gHyI

    This one debuted at #60:

    I Only Have Eyes For You – The Flamingos

    This is the 1st & most popular version of this song to chart. It will get to #11 for these folks, this version is in The Grammy Hall Of Fame. The song will hit #3 on the R&B Chart becoming their biggest single over there as well. The song was written for the Busby Berkeley movie musical Dames in 1934, where it was introduced by Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler. Ben Selvin recorded it that same year and landed at #2 on the charts.

    This was the 1st of just 2 Top 40 hits for this R&B group out of Chicago. Their Top 40 success lasts only until May of 1960, but they will continue to do well on the R&B Charts for many years to come.

    The Flamingos' version was arranged and co-produced by Terry "Buzzy" Johnson, a Baltimore native who joined the group as a first tenor in 1956. Fellow Flamingo Nate Nelson encouraged him to go crazy with the song, but he couldn't figure out what to do with it. All he knew was the other versions were way too vanilla for his taste. The answer finally came to him in a dream. He told Sound on Sound:

    "I was laying down in my room with the guitar on my chest, playing around with the chords, but no matter what I tried it just didn't fit. Finally, it was about 12 or one in the morning, and I was so tired that I fell asleep, and in my dream I heard 'I Only Have Eyes For You' just the way it came out on our record. I heard the 'doo-bop sh-bop' [backing vocals], I heard the way the harmony would sound - I heard the harmony so clear, and I heard the structure of the chords. As soon as I woke up, I grabbed the guitar off my chest and it was like God put my fingers just where they were supposed to be. I played those chords and I heard the harmonies, and so I called the guys. I woke them all up and I said, 'Come over to my room right now! I've got 'I Only Have Eyes For You'!'

    They were like, 'Are you crazy? It's almost four o'clock!' and I said, 'I need you all now, otherwise I may not be able to remember.' So they came to my room, all of them grumbling, and when they heard me do it they looked at me like, 'What the hell is this?' They laughed at me: 'What's 'doo-bop sh-bop, goo-bop sh-bop, boo-bop sh-bop, loo-bop sh-bop, shoo-bop sh-bop"?' You see, although in my dream it was 'doo-bop sh-bop', I had everybody doing a different thing, changing things around to make sure no one could really pick out what we were saying."
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrzusdilnKQ

    And this one debuted at #52:

    Lonely Boy – Paul Anka

    Paul wrote this song it is going to go all the way to #1, sit there for 4 weeks & land as the 6th biggest single of the year. The song hits #6 on the R&B Chart, 8 in Germany, 3 in the UK & 2 in Italy. He is still a month away from his 18th birthday at this point.

    This was the 2nd of his 3 #1 hit singles & with a 4 week run, it is also going to be the biggest hit of his career. Paul sang the song in a movie called Girls Town in which he co – starred with Mamie Van Doren.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKcCaCgMLBE

    There was also a debut single from a pair of brothers that charted on the same week, that I'd almost guarantee no one will have realized they went back that far but I'll post this one as well, because it is a pretty good song, their history is interestiong & they will now disappear for the next 13 years.

    The song debuted at #90:

    Cherrystone – The Addrisi Brothers

    This one stays on the chart for 6 weeks & climbs to #62. The Brothers wrote the song themselves.

    Brothers Don & Dick were from Winthrop Mass. This was their very 1st chart hit but try as they might they have no other hit singles on any chart at all throughout the 60’s & won’t have a Top 40 hit single until 1972.

    They certainly have an interesting history, if not a successful one. They were a part of their families acrobatic group, The Flying Addrisis. They were discovered as singers by Lenny Bruce & moved to California to pursue that course. They tried out for The Mickey Mouse Club, but didn’t make the cut. They recorded for multiple labels to almost no success at all & so decided to turn their craft to song writing instead. Perhaps their biggest success as writers was when the Association hit #2 in 1967 with the song Never My Love.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIVKLixvptM

    Hope these trip some memories for someone.....anyone....

    I let my husband look at your post , he's a die hard fan of these songs( and many more) just as you are. He will finish it later, but he said if I could thank you, to do so. So Thankyou razorbacker.
    razorbacker likes this.
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