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Thread: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

  1. #111
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    In honor of the great Leon Russell who passed away last night at the age of 74.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0X0aqx3UHI
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  2. #112
    FORT Fogey Miss Scarlet's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    ........and watch the sun go down.
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    "Success is getting what you want; Happiness is wanting what you get."

  3. #113
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Well here is one from May 12, 1958. I know you know it, I think you like it, I hope you enjoy it.

    Do You Want To Dance – Bobby Freeman

    There will be versions of the song to chart in 1964 (Del Shannon), 65 (The Beach Boys), 68 (The Mamas & Papas), 73 (Bette Midler), & 78 (The Ramones). None of those versions will match the success of this one though. This one sticks around for 17 weeks & gets all the way to #5. Bobby wrote the song himself. He was just 17 at the time of this single.

    This was the first chart single for Bobby. He was a singer, songwriter and record producer from San Francisco. In his career he will have 4 Top 40 hit singles, his 2nd & 3rd peak at #37 & his 1st & 4th get to #5. We won’t hear his other #5 hit & what was to be his final top 40 hit until 1964.

    Rumors are that this was Jerry Garcia on the guitar, but it has not been confirmed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLwxTYYZJS0

  4. #114
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    It's tough to get a conversation going on around here. Maybe it takes the old out of the box song...

    This one hit the charts for the 1st time on June 2, 1958.

    Purple People Eater – Sheb Wooley

    This song made its debut on the charts way up at #7 and it won’t be all for nothing. The song goes to #1, spends 6 weeks at the top & comes in as the 3rd biggest single of the year. It will also become the biggest Novelty Single of all time. Sheb wrote the song himself & no one else even tried to top it. This was the only Top 40 hit for him, but it was certainly a big one.

    Sheb was also an actor & just months after this single he began a run of 110 episodes of the hit show Rawhide where he played cowpoke Pete Nolan.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch…
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  5. #115
    Breezy Springy Arielflies's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    One of my very favorite songs!
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    The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. Dorothy Parker, (attributed)

  6. #116
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    This is what is known as try try again by me...LOL

    This song first charted on June 23 1958. It is pretty important not only because of the career it jump started but for the record label it helped to save.

    Splish Splash – Bobby Darin

    We have another artist making his chart debut. Bobby wrote this song with a bit of help from Jean Murray (who was also known as the DJ Murray The K) & it Is going to go all the way to #3 & stay around for 15 weeks. The song will hit #1 on the R & B Charts.

    He was born Walden Robert Cassotto in East Harlem. He began his career writing songs for Connie Francis, but he soon broke out on his own & he will continue to hit multiple charts throughout his career that lasts well into the early 70’s. His career & life were cut short when he died of heart failure in 1973 at the age of just 37.

    This was his first hit but he had signed with Atlantic Records after an unsuccessful stint at Decca. After three unsuccessful sessions at Atlantic with Herb Abramson producing, Ahmet Ertegun, who was head of the label, decided to produce Darin himself. "Splish Splash" was recorded on April 10, 1958 along with "Judy Don't Be Moody" and "Queen of the Hop." The recording took place at Atlantic's studios in New York with their renowned engineer Tom Dowd at the controls.

    This was released on Atlantic Records at a time when they were struggling to pay their artists. According to Jerry Wexler, who ran the company with Ahmet Ertegun, they had stopped paying themselves and needed money to resign The Clovers when Splish Splash and "Yakety Yak" by The Coasters broke through and got the company out of trouble. Atlantic went on to sign Led Zeppelin, Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, The Rolling Stones and many other legendary artists.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKCDc8Eg_-U

  7. #117
    Breezy Springy Arielflies's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Another favorite from my junior high years. "I'm takin' a bath"
    The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. Dorothy Parker, (attributed)

  8. #118
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    I haven’t posted one of these in a while, but I thought maybe someone would like these, or at least be interested to know that they both debuted on the Pop Charts September 22, 1958. They represent 2 artists that would go on to fame & both also saw tragic ends to their careers.


    To Know Him Is To Love Him – The Teddy Bears

    This was the 1st & only Top 40 hit single for this group & it is going all the way to the top. It will spend 3 weeks at #1 & come in as the 12th biggest single of the year. The song will also chart at 24 in 1965 for Peter & Gordon & at 34 in 1969 for Bobby Vinton. Phil Spector was the writer.

    The Teddy Bears were a white doo wop group out of LA. Phil put together The Teddy Bears (named after the Elvis Presley song) and wrote this so their new vocalist, Annette Kleinbard, would have something new to sing at a recording session. She didn't like the song, but agreed to sing it anyway. The group consisted of high school seniors Spector and Marshall Lieb, sophomore Kleinbard, and alumnus Sandy Nelson on the drum kit. Although Lieb played piano at the recording session, Spector had asked another friend to do it: future Beach Boy Bruce Johnston. Johnston declined because he had a date.

    This is the song that launched Phil Spector's career. He was a 17-year-old senior in high school when he recorded this, and he quickly became a top producer after working with prominent songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. By the time he was 23, he had produced hits like "Be My Baby" and "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" and was already a millionaire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L87X8k2IWK4

    Come On, Let’s Go – Ritchie Valens

    Ritchie wrote the song, it was his very first hit single, his was the first of 3 versions to land on the charts, but his will be the only version to not hit the Top 40. He comes to a halt at #42, while The McCoys get it to 22 in 1966 & Los Lobos will get it to 21 in 1987.

    Unfortunately for Richie with this song coming in late September & the fatal plane crash happening in February his recording career lasted just 8 months & consisted of just 2 Top 40 hit singles.

    Bob Keane, the owner and president of small record label Del-Fi Records in Hollywood, was given a tip in May 1958 by San Fernando High School student Doug Macchia about a young performer from Pacoima by the name of Richard Valenzuela. Kids knew the performer as "the Little Richard of San Fernando". After this first audition, Keane signed Ritchie to Del-Fi on May 27, 1958. At this point the musician took the name "Ritchie" because, as Keane said, "There were a bunch of 'Richies' around at that time, and I wanted it to be different."

    In the autumn of 1958, Valens quit high school to concentrate on his career. Keane booked appearances at venues across the United States and performances on television programs. Valens had a fear of flying due to a freak accident at his Pacoima Junior High School when, on January 31, 1957, two airplanes collided over the playground, killing or injuring several of his friends. Unfortunately, that fear didn't keep him out of the plane carrying Buddy Holly & The Big Bopper among others.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLrnU1K2Wso
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  9. #119
    FORT Fogey Miss Scarlet's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Yay! razorbacker's back with the hits! I've missed them.

    Maybe it's because these were huge hits & done multiple times, but I remember them both clearly.
    What a shame what happened to both of the singer/songwriters. One a tragic accident & the other a tragic result of fame.
    "Success is getting what you want; Happiness is wanting what you get."

  10. #120
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
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    Re: Rediscovering Classics / Music Memories

    Well there were a couple of pretty big debuting artists on the last post I made, so here is another one. This song first charted on September 29, 1958.

    Tom Dooley – The Kingston Trio

    This song was written by group member Dave Guard. It was the 1st chart hit for the group & it will become their biggest single & only #1 hit single. The song stays at #1 for just a week but that puts it as the 18th biggest song of the year. The song is in the Grammy Hall Of Fame. At the very first Grammy Awards in 1958, this won for Best Country & Western Performance. The song hit #1 in Australia, Norway, Canada, & Italy & #5 in the UK & #8 in South Africa.

    The group consisted of Dave Guard, Bob Shane & Nick Reynolds. Dave Guard was replaced by John Stewart in 1961.

    The song is about Tom Dula (pronounced Dooley) who was a real person. He was a gifted fiddle player and enjoyed the company of ladies. During the Civil War he served the Confederacy as a musician and was captured near the end of the war and held as a prisoner of war. After he was released he returned to his life and his relationship with Ann Melton and other women including Ann's cousin Laura Foster. On the day that he and Laura were to be married she disappeared and was found weeks later in a shallow grave. She had been stabbed in the heart.

    Tom knew that it was known he was the last person to see her alive so he fled the county and went to work for Colonel James Grayson on his farm in a nearby county. Dula stayed long enough to earn money for a pair of boots and then left for Tennessee where the posse with assistance from Colonel Grayson found him. He was taken back to North Carolina and was represented by ex-Governor of North Carolina Zebulon Vance. After a much publicized trial and appeal he was found guilty and hanged in Statesville North Carolina.

    The graves of Laura and Ann are visited each year by a number of tourists. Tom's grave is on private property and is not open to the public. The "Tom Dooley" museum is located in Ferguson North Carolina. The reason for the murder is not known but it appears he may have killed her because of contracting a venereal disease from her.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eb6I0YkSjb8
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