+ Reply to Thread
Page 27 of 41 FirstFirst ... 171819202122232425262728293031323334353637 ... LastLast
Results 261 to 270 of 403

Thread: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

  1. #261
    FORT Fogey norealityhere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8,113

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    THanks, Razor. I think we all love these looks back in time. Sometimes, however, I really start feeling old when I see them.
    Of note in this isssue is the Jackson 5 song review.
    To Thine Own Self Be True

  2. #262
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    9,211

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by norealityhere;3527886;
    THanks, Razor. I think we all love these looks back in time. Sometimes, however, I really start feeling old when I see them.
    Of note in this isssue is the Jackson 5 song review.
    Your welcome. I'm just glad someone is enjoying them. I just wish I could do them more frequently, but stupid stuff like work always gets in the way.

    This particular issue had a cover date that just so happened to be my 16th birthday, so I know what you mean about the feeling old thing.

    As to the Jackson 5 song, there were a bunch of different singles reviewed, many of them were old blues tunes that I had never heard of, by singers that jarred no memories so due to the events of yesterday, I just had to select the Jacksons.

    RIP Michael. Loved your music & your contributions to the world of Pop. It saddens me that you never had a chance to get back on the road & reestablish at least some of your reputation.

  3. #263
    FORT Fogey norealityhere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8,113

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by razorbacker;3528032;
    Your welcome. I'm just glad someone is enjoying them. I just wish I could do them more frequently, but stupid stuff like work always gets in the way.

    This particular issue had a cover date that just so happened to be my 16th birthday, so I know what you mean about the feeling old thing.

    As to the Jackson 5 song, there were a bunch of different singles reviewed, many of them were old blues tunes that I had never heard of, by singers that jarred no memories so due to the events of yesterday, I just had to select the Jacksons.

    RIP Michael. Loved your music & your contributions to the world of Pop. It saddens me that you never had a chance to get back on the road & reestablish at least some of your reputation.

    I think many of us enjoy these even though they make us realize our mortality.
    As I saw him perform 25 years ago, I sure would have loved to see him back on the stage again.
    I probably feel about Michael like you feel about Carrie.
    To Thine Own Self Be True

  4. #264
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    51
    Posts
    16,893

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Razorbacker, I really enjoy reading them. So much great music and it's interesting to hear what was said about it at the time and see how time has sometimes changed those feelings.

    I think I am only 1 of 2 or 3 people I know that has heard of It's a Beautiful Day.

    And Workingman's Dead?? One of the best albums EVER!

    I have had the Jackson 5's ABC running in my head since yesterday afternoon.

    In 1970, I was 8 years old and was listening to the Monkees and the Jackson 5, I didn't "discover" the other music that was reviewed until a few years later.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  5. #265
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    9,211

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Hey MRD & noreality,

    As a couple of the few that always have comments, I'd just like to say thanks. I know there are a bunch of us "older" folks out here that lived through a bunch of this stuff & it was always my hope that by putting these out here that there would be a bunch of folks that would share some of their memories, but for whatever reason that just hasn't happened. Anywho, thanks again.

    What I find interesting about reading all these is the almost casual way some of these newer artists are brought up in interviews or stories. One issue, a few back, mentioned Black Sabbath as being a new band in the UK, but there has been no follow up yet. Even further back, Free was given a somewhat throwaway comment as being one of the new bands performing at a festival somewhere & forgotten until this issue when their first album was given an almost incomprehensible review that revolved around bacon, orange juice, a wife, & a roomate (that's why I couldn't see any way to summarize it). Way back, in a review of a Bob Dylan album, it was mentioned that the guy playing bass on the studio tracks was none other than Nashville newcomer Charlie Daniels. Then in this issue, David Crosby casually mentions that he would like to produce an album for newcomer Jackson Browne but says he has no shot, because Jackson has such good songs that he will get scooped up by one of the bigger labels & David will be left out.

    That's the kind of stuff I find interesting to read. I tend to skip over most of the political stuff, at least until Watergate begins to become major news, & I'm interested to see how or if RS even covers it. Also, at this time, the magazine has had a section called "The Dope Pages" which rambles on for 8 to 10 pages an issue, I skip over that as well. There are book & movie reviews I usually don't read, because I'm all about the music (disclaimer alert: There is always a lot of stuff about the Blues, Jazz, & other formats that I never got interested in so I tend to not give them much of a notice either).

  6. #266
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    51
    Posts
    16,893

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by razorbacker;3528969;
    Hey MRD & noreality,

    As a couple of the few that always have comments, I'd just like to say thanks. I know there are a bunch of us "older" folks out here that lived through a bunch of this stuff & it was always my hope that by putting these out here that there would be a bunch of folks that would share some of their memories, but for whatever reason that just hasn't happened. Anywho, thanks again.

    What I find interesting about reading all these is the almost casual way some of these newer artists are brought up in interviews or stories. One issue, a few back, mentioned Black Sabbath as being a new band in the UK, but there has been no follow up yet. Even further back, Free was given a somewhat throwaway comment as being one of the new bands performing at a festival somewhere & forgotten until this issue when their first album was given an almost incomprehensible review that revolved around bacon, orange juice, a wife, & a roomate (that's why I couldn't see any way to summarize it). Way back, in a review of a Bob Dylan album, it was mentioned that the guy playing bass on the studio tracks was none other than Nashville newcomer Charlie Daniels. Then in this issue, David Crosby casually mentions that he would like to produce an album for newcomer Jackson Browne but says he has no shot, because Jackson has such good songs that he will get scooped up by one of the bigger labels & David will be left out.

    That's the kind of stuff I find interesting to read. I tend to skip over most of the political stuff, at least until Watergate begins to become major news, & I'm interested to see how or if RS even covers it. Also, at this time, the magazine has had a section called "The Dope Pages" which rambles on for 8 to 10 pages an issue, I skip over that as well. There are book & movie reviews I usually don't read, because I'm all about the music (disclaimer alert: There is always a lot of stuff about the Blues, Jazz, & other formats that I never got interested in so I tend to not give them much of a notice either).
    I don't know if they cover Watergate, but Hunter S. Thompson does a fantastic series of articles on the Nixon campaign in 72. Which is what became the book Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail.
    You should start seeing his articles for Rolling Stone begin in about 1971 I think.

    I also like seeing the casually dropped names of what would become major stars when they are just beginning.

    I noticed Rick Derringer mentioned in this last one. I used to know the guy that was his drummer much, much, much later.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  7. #267
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    9,211

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;3529073;
    I don't know if they cover Watergate, but Hunter S. Thompson does a fantastic series of articles on the Nixon campaign in 72. Which is what became the book Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail.
    You should start seeing his articles for Rolling Stone begin in about 1971 I think.

    I also like seeing the casually dropped names of what would become major stars when they are just beginning.

    I noticed Rick Derringer mentioned in this last one. I used to know the guy that was his drummer much, much, much later.
    Rick Derringer is a bit of a different case though. He had been around since The McCoy's first hit the charts with Hang On Sloopy back in 1965. Their last hit came out in May of 1966, so perhaps the gig with Johnny Winter could be called a bit of a rebirth for him, even if it was as a backup musician, he was at least back on the scene. He would also eventually join with Edgar Winter & had a huge hand in Frankenstein as a producer. Then 1974 & Rock & Roll Hootchie Coo...

  8. #268
    FORT Fogey norealityhere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8,113

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by razorbacker;3528969;
    Hey MRD & noreality,

    As a couple of the few that always have comments, I'd just like to say thanks. I know there are a bunch of us "older" folks out here that lived through a bunch of this stuff & it was always my hope that by putting these out here that there would be a bunch of folks that would share some of their memories, but for whatever reason that just hasn't happened. Anywho, thanks again.

    What I find interesting about reading all these is the almost casual way some of these newer artists are brought up in interviews or stories. One issue, a few back, mentioned Black Sabbath as being a new band in the UK, but there has been no follow up yet. Even further back, Free was given a somewhat throwaway comment as being one of the new bands performing at a festival somewhere & forgotten until this issue when their first album was given an almost incomprehensible review that revolved around bacon, orange juice, a wife, & a roomate (that's why I couldn't see any way to summarize it). Way back, in a review of a Bob Dylan album, it was mentioned that the guy playing bass on the studio tracks was none other than Nashville newcomer Charlie Daniels. Then in this issue, David Crosby casually mentions that he would like to produce an album for newcomer Jackson Browne but says he has no shot, because Jackson has such good songs that he will get scooped up by one of the bigger labels & David will be left out.

    That's the kind of stuff I find interesting to read. I tend to skip over most of the political stuff, at least until Watergate begins to become major news, & I'm interested to see how or if RS even covers it. Also, at this time, the magazine has had a section called "The Dope Pages" which rambles on for 8 to 10 pages an issue, I skip over that as well. There are book & movie reviews I usually don't read, because I'm all about the music (disclaimer alert: There is always a lot of stuff about the Blues, Jazz, & other formats that I never got interested in so I tend to not give them much of a notice either).

    Razor,

    Thanks again. It is really interesting when some of the political stuff does come out. Rolling Stone has had so much going on in it for years. Definitely provides a framework / background. Funny how you often will associate
    music with what was going on at the time and, obviously, politics has played a part in it through the years. Funny to read about the drug problems of David Crosby as being the reason he was cut from the Byrds. Just saw CSN last summer and David actually looked the best of the 3. Not saying that drugs preserved him, but......he looked pretty darned good next to Nash and Stills....
    To Thine Own Self Be True

  9. #269
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    51
    Posts
    16,893

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    It's his new liver. Rejuvenated him :-)
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  10. #270
    FORT Fogey norealityhere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8,113

    Re: Rock & Roll Historical Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;3529599;
    It's his new liver. Rejuvenated him :-)
    I forgot about that.

    It kind of reminded me of the old joke about Keith Richards from the Rolling Stones. It was always said that he had his blood recycled. Well, he may not look so great these days, but he sure has outlived a lot of others, so maybe there's something to that urban myth.
    To Thine Own Self Be True

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.