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Thread: Luciano Pavarotti Dies

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    That's all folks! Unklescott's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    Things aren't looking good for Pavarotti.
    Tennessean.com - Nashville news from The Tennessean, MUSIC CITY U.S.A
    Reports: Pavarotti's condition worsens

    ROME (AP) -- Luciano Pavarotti's health has deteriorated and the tenor was in very serious condition, suffering kidney problems and losing consciousness, a local Italian TV station reported Wednesday.

    Television station E' TV Antenna-1 in Modena reported that the 71-year-old tenor, who has pancreatic cancer, had lost consciousness and was suffering from kidney problems at the Modena home where he has been recovering following a hospital stay.

    The ANSA news agency, citing medical sources, said Pavarotti was believed to have lost consciousness for brief moments in recent days. The AGI news agency said Pavarotti was in "very serious condition." It didn't name its sources.

    Modena hospital spokesman Alberto Greco confirmed Pavarotti was at home, but said he had no further information.

    Pavarotti's manager, Terri Robson, did not deny the reports; an associate answering Robson's phone said she had no comment.

    Pavarotti was released from the hospital Aug. 25, more than two weeks after he was admitted with a high fever. At the time, Robson denied Italian news reports that he had been treated for pneumonia.

    The opera star had surgery for the cancer in July 2006 in a New York hospital.

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly forms of the disease, though doctors said the surgery offered improved hopes for survival.

    At the time of the operation, Pavarotti had been preparing to resume his farewell tour. He has made no public appearances since then.

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    FORT Fogey canadian_angel's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    They certainly weren't.
    E! News - Prolific Tenor Pavarotti Dies

    He has now, sadly, passed on.

  3. #3
    That's all folks! Unklescott's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    That's so sad. I just went to YouTube to watch a performance of Ave Maria. I also ran across him and Barry White doing My First, My Last. My Everything and James Brown doing It's A Man's World. RIP Luciano Pavarotti.

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    Shark Week! dagwood's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    We have lost a great voice. Rest In Peace, Mr Pavarotti.
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    Premium Member DesertRose's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    This thread was my first stop this morning. May you rest in peace Mr. Pavarotti. You are a great legend.
    One of the songs that sticks out in my head when I think of him is the duet he did with Bono: Miss Sarajevo. It always gives me chills when I listen to it.

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    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    I add my condolences also....a great voice was lost.....
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

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    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    Pavarotti's reputation as the best operatic tenor of our time was well deserved. I've listened to Domingo and Carras, but they paled next to Pavarotti. I love to listen to, and yes, sing along to Pavarotti in the car. Even though I've heard it perhaps a hundred times, his Nessun Dorma still gives me chills. The first opera that I saw (on PBS) was Pavarotti in Rigoletto. If not for his brilliance, I don't know that I would have ever been hooked on opera.

    Bravo, Luciano.
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    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    I thought of you and your love of the opera Newf when I head that Pavarotti had passed away...
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

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    Re: Miscellaneous Music News

    I was so sad this morning when I first heard the news. I'm going to miss his amazing voice.
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    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Luciano Pavarotti Dies

    News Home - Ask.com News Search

    Luciano Pavarotti: A Tenor Like No OtherSep 6, 11:39 PM (ET)
    By RONALD BLUM

    Luciano Pavarotti was bigger than life - the oversized belly, huge handkerchief, grandiose lifestyle and ever-present grin that shone like a beacon. He backed it up with a voice of intense focus and immense carrying power that rang to the rafters on stages throughout the world.

    He broke out of classical music's insular world in an era when television became dominant, singing alongside Stevie Wonder and Sting as naturally as he did opposite Joan Sutherland and Mirella Freni. He was beloved by opera patrons in gowns and tailcoats, and by the masses who came in T-shirts and jeans to hear him sing in Central and Hyde parks.

    "He had the most perfect technique in the history of recorded music," soprano Renee Fleming said after Pavarotti died Thursday at age 71. "He also captured the hearts of the larger public in a way which rivaled only Enrico Caruso in the 20th century."

    A lyric tenor, Pavarotti owned some of opera's classic roles: Rodolfo in Puccini's "La Boheme." Riccardo in Verdi's "Un Ballo in Maschera" and Nemorino in Donizetti's "L'Elisir d'Amore." He first gained great fame as Tonio in Donizetti's "La Fille du Regiment," tossing off the famous nine high Cs of "Ah, mes amis" with startling ease.

    His inclusion in a cast meant an instant sellout from San Francisco to Sydney, Mexico to Milan. Listening to recordings or watching DVDs, it's easy to understand why. His voice is immediately recognizable, a warm Italian diction like no other, with beauty of tone, color and heft.

    "His voice was unique," said former Metropolitan Opera general manager Joe Volpe, who planned to attend Saturday's funeral in Modena. "If you put a CD on today and it's Luciano singing, you know it."

    When the orchestra swelled and Pavarotti sang "O soave fanciulla" in the first act of "Boheme," hearts melted and tears welled in audience's eyes. When he sang a triumphal "Vincero!" and held the final note to end "Nessun dorma" in Puccini's "Turandot," shivers went up and down spines.

    In the annals of music, he joined Caruso, Beniamino Gigli, Giuseppe Di Stefano, Mario Del Monaco and Franco Corelli as Italian tenors of the highest rank.

    He pushed with mixed success into spinto and dramatic parts such as Canio in Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci," Radames in Verdi's "Aida" and the title role in Verdi's "Otello." It's hard to forget the array of sprays and potions he kept using to sing through a cold in a 1991 concert performance of "Otello" at Carnegie Hall with Sir Georg Solti conducting the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

    And later in his career he could be shockingly unprepared: There was a Verdi Requiem at Carnegie Hall in 1996 when he appeared to be forgetting the words, stadium concerts where he was accused of lip-syncing. When he returned to the Met in 1995 for "La Fille," the aria was transposed down and he struggled with his high Bs.

    Some of his repertoire choices, especially at Three Tenors concerts, were unfortunate. There was "Moon River" and "My Way" - with Frank Sinatra in the audience - at Dodger Stadium in 1994 and a laughable rendition of "Yesterday" at Yokohama, Japan, in 2002.

    Pavarotti was banned from the Lyric Opera of Chicago in 1989 after one cancellation too many. His acting was perfunctory even before hip and knee problems brought on by his enormous weight limited movement. His opera portrayals can't be compared to Placido Domingo's studied and nuanced performances.

    Domingo said that he and Pavarotti were often perceived as competitors, but that they were close friends whose rivalry made them both better men and better artists.

    "I think the career of Luciano was bigger because I was there as his friendly rival, and I think my career is bigger because he was there also as a friendly rival," a somber Domingo said at a news conference Thursday.

    Pavarotti didn't act parts - the part became him, and the rest of the performance rotated around him. Soprano Deborah Voigt was shocked when he disappeared in the middle of a "Ballo" performance to go off stage. Somehow, the rest of the cast adapted.

    "If he needed a drink of water, so be it! Because his voice was what had drawn everyone to that theater," she said. "It was a voice given by God. A sound uniquely his."

    All he had to do was smile, furrow those bushy eyebrows or bat an eyelash. Volpe was convinced Pavarotti won the audience over before he sang.

    "His singing spoke right to the hearts of listeners whether they knew anything about opera or not," Met music director James Levine said.

    Yet, Pavarotti almost always suffered from stage fright, wondering when he walked onstage whether his voice would be with him that night. He said his reward came during curtain calls when he heard shouts of "Bravo!"

    "They love me," he said in his New York apartment overlooking Central Park three years ago, a day before his farewell to opera. "I love them. It's a mutual affair."

    ---

    Associated Press writer Daisy Nguyen in Los Angeles contributed to this report

    I'm not a big opera fan, but anytime I stumbled across a TV performance of his, I stopped and listened. What an incredible talent!
    He will be missed.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

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