Note to Mods: Since there is no folder here for radio, I don't know if this fits here or not, but since this is about someone who played music, I felt this fit here. Please move if necessary.

Not only is today (September 7) my hitting the big 4-0, but:

It's also the birthday of one of the true legends of New York Radio!!

It was September 7, 1934 that Dan Ingram was born in New York, a city he would return to in 1961 and over the next 20+ years would cement himself as a legend of New York Radio on lengendary station WABC (770 AM) that as "Musicradio 77" from 1960-'82, a station that in its heyday could be heard at night in 38 states and was listened to by more people than arguably any other station ever. Ingram, along with fellow legends Herb Oscar Anderson, Ron Lundy, "Cousin" Bruce Morrow, Chuch Leonard, Charlie Greer and later Harry Harrison made WABC what it was, a station that is still fondly remember some 23+ years after it went to talk, so much so that for the last eight years on Memorial Day, the station has returned to its music roots, playing the shows from the time when it was the most popular station in America!

How great was Dan Ingram? I was too young to hear or appreciate him in his WABC heyday, but I always knew what kind of a legend he truly was, and from 1991-2003 when I was in New York on a Saturday or Sunday, I would have a chance to hear "the master" on WCBS-FM (101.1), and he truly still was that. His word and honor group of the day were great features of the show along with his many jokes on the intro/ends of songs that made him the legend he truly was.

On a site dedicated to the memory of Musicradio 77 WABC, there is a complete archive of Dan's 20th anniversary show on WABC that took place on July 3, 1981. You can hear the entire show by going to:

http://musicradio.computer.net/ingram20.html

You do need RealPlayer to hear it. It's an entire four-hour show broken up into four one-hour segments where you can hear everything that made Dan the legend he truly is, and how great WABC really was in its heyday.