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Thread: Batman Begins - 06/15/05

  1. #11
    Not caring is fun! Matt64's Avatar
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    I'm looking forward to it. I was reading some of the reviews on yahoo and they all say basically the same thing. I loved Batman and Batman Returns, loathed Batman Forever and Batman and Robin.. I liked the seriousness of the first 2, and hated that the second 2 were just laughable parodies. Batman has always been a cool character, and it'll be interesting to see what they do with it..

  2. #12
    Rude and Abrasive Texicana's Avatar
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    I hope you enjoy it Matt64
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  3. #13
    the sweetest thing snickers's Avatar
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    i liked it

    bale is my favorite batman of all

    i liked how they got away from the comedy and got back to the seriousness of the story

  4. #14
    Leia-Jakita-Arendt OnMyLunchBreak's Avatar
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    Loved It!

    Okay, first let me get one thing straight for all the fanboys out there, this ain’t no Batman: Year One. But, if you really are a fanboy, you’ve probably already seen the movie and don’t need me to tell you that. (Heck, if you are really a fanboy you probably knew that before you even saw the movie!)

    However, all the things that were great about Batman: Year One and about all of Frank Miller’s Batman works are in this movie. In Batman Begins we are introduced for the first time on film to a superhero who is both brave and fearful, determined and tortured. Christian Bale, as Batman, brings an intensity to the role and a genuine violence that greatly surpasses the past instantiations of this, I thought, doomed franchise.

    The style and visual effects are, as expected, seamless and impressive. Gotham has left the stylized pages of the comic book to become a real life city that courses with New York grittiness and sparkle. Wayne Mansion is not some archetypical set-piece of a gothic mansion, but replete with old world and old money grandeur – a perfect castle for the Dark Knight. Early in the film, when Bruce Wayne is on his tortured journey through an unnamed Asian country, we are treated to Imax quality panoramas and beautifully shot scenery.

    And then there are the bats. Can I just talk about the bats? They bathe our hero at one point as if he is being reborn through flame. In this movie they are both Bruce Wayne’s greatest fear, his inspiration and his most desperate weapon. Never before has Batman so been worthy of his nocturnal moniker.

    But, fear not, this movie is not just eye candy. At the heart of the film there is a drama about fear and justice. Fear is present in all of the characters. For Batman, it is something to face but overcome. For the villains (Ra’s Al Ghul and The Scarecrow) the existence of fear is used as a measuring device for weakness and as a psychological weapon, respectively. Justice, too, comes into play for all those involved and in the end, the climax of the movie is not so much about tactical battles, but about a clash of idealistic paradigms. These forces push the movie along until even Batman, at times, seems less the superhero and more the man just trying to save his city. Which, in a way, makes him all the more heroic.

    The movie was superbly cast. Christian Bale turns his American Psycho intensity into a brooding, thoughtful and clear-minded protagonist. Liam Neeson, as always, is stellar. Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman as Alfred and Fox, respectively, live comfortably in their oft played, but never with such panache, characters. Katie Holmes does what she is supposed to do – little adding but not detracting.

    However, in perhaps my favorite adaptation in this film and something I have been waiting for in the Batman movies, Gary Oldman plays a wonderfully expanded Jim Gordon character. This dynamic is always interesting in the comics and it is explored to some depth in this movie. Gordon has more to do, more to say and delivers as the “everyman” hero I have come to know.

    A thoroughly enjoyable ride in the Batmobile for your eyes and your mind.

    My favorite line:

    Batman: "Do I look like a cop?"
    Last edited by OnMyLunchBreak; 06-21-2005 at 12:42 PM.

  5. #15
    FORT Fanatic happyblue's Avatar
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    Now I wanna see it again, OnMyLunchBreak. Nice review.

  6. #16
    Can They Do It?? mrdobolina's Avatar
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    Damn, OMLB....I couldn't have said it better myself. And I will re-iterate some points. I thought Gary Oldham was the breakout character as Gordon. He was actually integral to the story, unlike the commish in the first 4 movies. A fleshed out, family man/cop...the only good cop in a corrupt city. Not a blithering idiot/mutant child of the commisioner and Chief O'Hara of 60's TV fame like that guy in the other movies.

    Loved Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox, and all of his kick ass inventions. Here's another character with a solid background, who wants to do good.

    In general, I just really like the background building done in this movie. Not only was it visually stunning(in a mostly low-tech kinda way), but the story was superb, the narrative flowed, and the acting was more than par.
    "You don't own a TV?!? What's all your furniture pointed at?" Joey Tribianni

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  7. #17
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OnMyLunchBreak
    Okay, first let me get one thing straight for all the fanboys out there, this ain’t no Batman: Year One.


    But, if you really are a fanboy, you’ve probably already seen the movie and don’t need me to tell you that. (Heck, if you are really a fanboy you probably knew that before you even saw the movie!)


    In Batman Begins we are introduced for the first time on film to a superhero who is both brave and fearful, determined and tortured. Christian Bale, as Batman, brings an intensity to the role and a genuine violence that greatly surpasses the past instantiations of this, I thought, doomed franchise.
    I haven't seen the film (yet), but I love your description of the Bale Batman. Frankly, after Batman and Batman Returns, I knew plenty o' fanboys and fangirls who loved Keaton's Batman. I was never a convert. Beneath the angst, I still saw Beetlejuice, and I never saw the tortured soul.

    And then there are the bats. Can I just talk about the bats? They bathe our hero at one point as if he is being reborn through flame. In this movie they are both Bruce Wayne’s greatest fear, his inspiration and his most desperate weapon. Never before has Batman so been worthy of his nocturnal moniker.
    The use of the bats is perhaps one of my favorite Frank Miller devices in both Year One and The Dark Knight Returns.

    These forces push the movie along until even Batman, at times, seems less the superhero and more the man just trying to save his city. Which, in a way, makes him all the more heroic.
    Right. In a way, I've thought that the Batman that was portrayed in the late 80's and early 90's (basically definining "grim 'n' gritty," a Wolverine with a cape) was not true to the spirit of the character.

    Gotham City is the site of the most tragic event in Wayne's life. He has the resources to live anywhere in the world, so why choose to stay and defend Gotham?

    Very interesting point, OnMyLunchBreak.

    Gary Oldman plays a wonderfully expanded Jim Gordon character. This dynamic is always interesting in the comics and it is explored to some depth in this movie. Gordon has more to do, more to say and delivers as the “everyman” hero I have come to know.
    The Gordon/Batman dynamic works best when the Gordon character is as equally complex as Bruce Wayne/Batman. In the movies-that-must-not-be-named, Gordon is every bit the farce that he is in the TV series.

    A thoroughly enjoyable ride in the Batmobile for your eyes and your mind.
    Thank you, OnMyLunchBreak! Excellent review, and now I doubly look forward to the film!
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things don’t always soften the bad things, but...the bad things don’t always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  8. #18
    FORT Fanatic happyblue's Avatar
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    This movie also proves Christopher Nolan as a real deal director. It seems he's been on a roll since Memento. By the way, is his debut, "Following," any good?

  9. #19
    Can They Do It?? mrdobolina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OnMyLunchBreak
    Okay, first let me get one thing straight for all the fanboys out there, this ain’t no Batman: Year One.
    A true statement. However, is it just me, or was the line at the beginning of the movie when Bruce gets in a fight with the prisoners("you're practice") straight out of Dark Knight Returns?
    "You don't own a TV?!? What's all your furniture pointed at?" Joey Tribianni

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  10. #20
    Leia-Jakita-Arendt OnMyLunchBreak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrdobolina
    A true statement. However, is it just me, or was the line at the beginning of the movie when Bruce gets in a fight with the prisoners("you're practice") straight out of Dark Knight Returns?
    I'm actually reading Dark Knight Returns right now.

    I also really liked the way that the movie explained why Bruce Wayne chose the bat as his symbol - because he was afraid of it, because he had childhood trauma associated with it, because the movie was about overcoming fear and that he wanted others to be as afraid of him as he was of bats. In the comic, doesn't it just come about because he's in his study when a bat crashes through the window, more of a Eureka! moment?

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