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Thread: Does anyone know who Drew Carey and Bret Butler did pick?

  1. #11
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    Drew and Bret were all for Naturman, but it was mostly Ant getting on that pissed them off so much. Also, as for Anthony Clark staying out of the controversy...by the time the keys were given out, Tony was so drunk he could barley stand up.

  2. #12
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krom
    Basically, the implication is that the celebs voted piecemeal for who they liked--assuming they had 1/4 influence each and not 1/8, and the producers deliberately voted in a "block"--all for the same people--to ensure they got their way.
    I know you're explaining it based on what they said on the show, but I smell more spin than truth. You can't argue the math but I doubt it was 8 individual votes in any case. I think it was producers deciding who they want for sure, and let the comics vote the rest. Or more likely, they decided all 10 comics. Drew Carey et al were there to drawer viewers, and it's unfortunate they weren't upfront with them about their non-decision making role.

    I still think they actually expected to make their decisions and either the celebrity judges wouldn't guess they were overridden, or their wishes would magically coincide with the producers'. The spin machine was working hard during the whole episode.
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  3. #13
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    This is a guess, but besides Naturman, they were on their feet for Wiggins... Clarke was on his feet practically before the set ended, and the other comic celebs gave a standing O as well.

  4. #14
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    It all seemed staged to me actually. They kept showing Naturman's face when they were giving out keys. How did they know Bret and Drew would be so upset? A bad acting job to me!

  5. #15
    Fool... but no pity. Krom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hepcat
    I know you're explaining it based on what they said on the show, but I smell more spin than truth. You can't argue the math but I doubt it was 8 individual votes in any case. I think it was producers deciding who they want for sure, and let the comics vote the rest. Or more likely, they decided all 10 comics. Drew Carey et al were there to drawer viewers, and it's unfortunate they weren't upfront with them about their non-decision making role.

    I still think they actually expected to make their decisions and either the celebrity judges wouldn't guess they were overridden, or their wishes would magically coincide with the producers'. The spin machine was working hard during the whole episode.
    I'm more using logic than just trusting them. The question was "who did Carey and Butler vote for", not "how many did the producers decide".

    Yes, the producer's would have overriden as many as they needed to if the comics hadn't already picked some of the people the producer's already wanted. But again... that doesn't mean that the comics were unanimous--just that they had the knowledge that is some cases at least three of them had voted for someone and not made it through.

    Forget the producer's explanation. I'm going by the reactions of people. Naturman seemed expected by everyone--including both the other comics backstage, Dan himself, and Carey and Butler. Ergo, Carey and Butler wanted him. and they pretty much came out and said that Clarke did too ( I doubt the third person they were referring to was Tess--she seemed to react to different people than the rest).

    Now Carey never actually said it was 2 people who they were overriden on, but he did use a plural. It could have been 2, it might have been 10--although I doubt the second. But even ignoring the producer's votes--fictional or real--"overridden" assumes that Carey and Butler KNEW that at least two others on their panel voted with them (Carey and Butler probably didn't vote the same on every comic).

    We know that both halves of the show were shot the same night, and Butler seemed like her fuse was already lit when she heard Naturman being passed over. I think that she'd already been biting her tongue and wondering what happened in the first part. We KNOW that Ant and Gary Gulman got in during the first half though, and Monty Hoffman, Dan Adhoot and Marina Franklin didn't (and all 3 seemed to get a decent amount of audience and celeb judge support). So perhaps Butler was already suspicious, but hadn't yet conferred with the other judges enough to realize when and where they'd been overriden. She probably just leaned over to Carey at some later point and asked "who did you vote for". Heck, eventually she probably did that with all three of the others.

    Clarke, at a minimum, we know definitely voted for Wiggins. He was clapping like a manaic after the guy's set. And I'd bet Carey did too--he likes that old school stuff. Butler definitely voted for first-halfer Bonnie McFarlane, and seem to remember thinking that Tess seemed to like her too--although the reaction shot of her was very momentary. Dan Adhoot, in the first half, seemed to have celeb panel appreciation, at least in part.

    During Ant's set, I seem to recall thinking that they showed the audience more than the panel. There were a few others I recall thinking that about, although I'd have to meditate (or rewind) a bit more to check.

  6. #16
    Fool... but no pity. Krom's Avatar
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    By the way, this article refers to an appearance by Jay Mohr on the Jimmy Kimmel show where he "explains" the voting.

    Among other things Mohr said:
    -"Drew cried".
    -"If all four judges voted for someone, then that person made the house."
    -"Then after those were looked at, the comics that landed on at least three of the judges' cards were put up on the board."
    -"they found there were only seven names on the board and twelve comics not being picked by a majority of the judges (Yes, this makes 19 instead of 20, but Jay does not explain on Jimmy Kimmel why it only added up to 19)"
    -"Jay also makes mention that Anthony Clark only wrote four names down"
    -"Jay also made a point of stating that neither he nor his manager Barry Katz were allowed to vote or even be in the room when the voting was done."

    Of course Katz (who manages Ant and Gulman as well as Mohr) and Mohr not being allowed to vote, if true, doesn't mean that Katz's influence wasn't felt indirectly.

    Mohr implies above that contestants with three celeb votes were "put on the board". Now does that mean "in the house" or "put under consideration"? Because Naturman got three votes according to Carey.

    Frankly I STILL find the NBC censorship of Dave Mordal more disturbing than this. This was just stupid, and I can leave it at that. The censorship was either annoyingly politically correct and/or part of a cover-up--and that bothers me more.
    Last edited by Krom; 06-19-2004 at 01:16 AM.

  7. #17
    Mrs. Pusser's fanclub pudman13's Avatar
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    The answer's been out there all along

    I just found this news article from MAY 8!! Here Drew Carey says exactly which candidate he wanted and which he did not:

    Carey Cracks on NBC "Comic"
    by Kimberly Potts
    Mar 8, 2004, 3:40 PM PT

    Hey, didja hear the one about the NBC reality show that's being called
    crooked and dishonest?

    It's no joke. Though usually we have to wait until after a reality series
    has premiered for the scandals to begin, that's not the case with NBC's next
    edition of the talent search series Last Comic Standing.

    Comedian and TV star Drew Carey, during an appearance over the weekend at
    the U.S. Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen, accused NBC and Last Comic Standing
    II's producers of shady behavior. Carey, who, along with former Grace Under
    Fire star Brett Butler and Yes, Dear star Anthony Clark, served as a judge
    in a preliminary round of Last Comic Standing II, said the show's producers
    ignored the judges' votes for which contestants should advance to the top 10
    and instead cast their own choices.

    The show, which averaged a little more than 8 million viewers each week for
    NBC last summer and is scheduled to hit airwaves again this June, taped a
    semifinal round on Feb. 26 in Las Vegas. Carey and his fellow funny types
    were asked to help whittle 20 contenders down to 10 finalists, who will live
    together and compete weekly until all but one is voted out of the contest.

    But Carey says he and the judges were shocked when the top 10 were
    announced. After comparing notes, the judges realized that their favorite
    contestant, who had also gotten a standing ovation from the audience, wasn't
    among the finalists. Meanwhile, a contestant who had, according to Carey,
    flopped during the competition, moved into the final round.

    "Brett walked out and Anthony ripped his mike off in disgust," Carey told
    Variety. "No one could believe it. As far as I knew, we'd be judges to see
    who would go into the house. Turns out we're not." The Hollywood Reporter
    quoted Carey saying the talent contest "was crooked and dishonest."

    "It was like somebody at NBC cast the show ahead of the event in Vegas. And
    they had 1,100 in the audience [for the semifinals competition] who saw how
    blatantly it was cast. If this happened on Survivor or any other reality TV
    show, it would be a major scandal."

    Carey told the Los Angeles Times that an openly gay comic named Ant was
    apparently chosen because his sexual orientation made him a better fit than
    Carey's preferred wisecracker, Dan Naturman.

    Butler, via her official Website, groused: "As panel judges, we can say that
    (a) we were both surprised and disappointed at the results and (b) we had
    NOTHING to do with them."

    Last Comic Standing, hosted by gagmeister Jay Mohr, is the comic version of
    American Idol, with the winner, as chosen by the viewing audience, receiving
    a talent deal with NBC. Last summer's premiere contest helped launch the
    careers of winner Dat Phan and runner-up and frequent Tough Crowd with Colin
    Quinn guest Ralphie May.

    But, according to Carey, based on a disclaimer he was told about after he
    made a fuss about the judges' lack of input in the Las Vegas semifinal
    competition, even the audience voting during the broadcasted rounds of
    competition may not be the final arbiter of who wins the comedy crown.

    Carey said producers pointed out to him that a brief disclaimer, which runs
    among the end credits of the show, leaves the final decision on all matters,
    including voting and casting, up to producers.

    "It's not about who's funniest," Carey told Variety. "They were casting it.
    The producers can change the outcome of the show whenever they wish. Why
    would they have a contest and judges if they were just going to cast it
    anyway?"

    Carey was traveling and unavailable for further comment Monday, but his
    publicist said the comic stood by his comments.

    It's probably safe to say that Carey, who also told Variety that he
    consulted his attorney in the matter, probably won't be among the show's
    celeb judges in the future. "I thought the whole thing stunk, and I'm mad
    they had my name associated with it," he said. "I've got a certain amount of
    integrity in this business and I'm not going to be compromised. You can't
    use me and my reputation. Do it with someone else's reputation."

    NBC's response to the brouhaha? The network essentially confirmed Carey's
    claim about the disclaimer, minus the crooked and dishonest bits, natch.

    "The casting decisions were made by NBC and NBC Studios in consultation with
    talent scouts and we appreciate their valuable input," the network said in a
    statement. "Now that the 10 participants have been selected, the program
    will begin. As was the case last season, during the show, the comic
    elimination decisions will now be made by audiences who watch the comics
    perform, without any input from NBC, NBC Studios or anyone else associated
    with the program."

    So let the search for the next Dat Phan begin.

  8. #18
    D'oh chowderr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pudman13
    But, according to Carey, based on a disclaimer he was told about after he made a fuss about the judges' lack of input in the Las Vegas semifinal competition, even the audience voting during the broadcasted rounds of competition may not be the final arbiter of who wins the comedy crown.

    I wonder if that is why the percentages seemed so off during the elimination rounds (this year and last)
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  9. #19
    Mrs. Pusser's fanclub pudman13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chowderr
    I wonder if that is why the percentages seemed so off during the elimination rounds (this year and last)
    No...they then go on to say that as soon as the ten are
    chosen for the house, NBC no longer has any input.

    Of course, there may be subtle ways the audiences are
    influenced, though I'm not sure how.

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