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Thread: Kid Nation in the Media

  1. #11
    Kanai Nemeses's Avatar
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    Quote Originally Posted by Bearcata;2547578;
    As far as the mother complianinng that her daughter had sunburn on her hands and face; ah DUH! It's New Mexico in the summer.
    Just as a clarification which didn't appear in the news item being quoted, but has been covered here locally 25 miles from where this was filmed... those sunburns were 3rd degree burns. Even here in NM, we do have such things as sunblock and shade, so this is more than a "duh, it's New Mexico in the summer".
    I live in my own world. But it's ok, they know me there.
    Kid Nation... a sad day for society when the exploitation of children becomes acceptable entertainment for television viewers.
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  2. #12
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    Quote Originally Posted by ShrinkingViolet;2547589;
    Have you checked into college prices lately? I'm paying $40,000 for one year.



    This really sounds like a disgruntled parent, which probably means her child didn't win. The tune would probably change had won.



    I'm glad they did an investigation, but I'm sure there will still be some kids and parents unhappy because this didn't turn out how they had envisioned it.
    Ah, welcome to the editable world of reality TV.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  3. #13
    Leo
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    CBS goes on the defensive over Kid | Entertainment | Television | Reuters

    CBS goes on the defensive over "Kid"
    Sun Aug 26, 2007 9:18PM EDT

    By Carl DiOrio

    LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Reality shows might need to court controversy to succeed, but a spreading hubbub around CBS' "Kid Nation" suggests that sometimes execs need to be careful what they wish for.

    The American Federation of Television and Radio Actors (AFTRA) said Friday that it will probe whether producers of "Kid Nation" violated their union contract with harsh treatment of amateur kid performers on the CBS reality show, set to premiere September 19.

    Shot on location at a ghost town in New Mexico, the show assembled a group of 40 kids ages 8-15 who had to fend for themselves by cooking, cleaning and even forming their own local "government." Questions have been raised about medical care and other conditions during the six-week shoot, which wrapped May 10.

    CBS has defended its producers on the show and denied any allegations of mistreatment. But New Mexico authorities said earlier this month that they were looking into the situation, and AFTRA promised to investigate abuse reports.

    "We've had a number of complaints from some of our members about the reports they have, and we have read press reports about long hours and that sort of thing," AFTRA spokesman John Hinrichs said. "So we just want to take a good look at it and see if the kids are covered by (AFTRA's Network Code) agreement."

    As nonpros, the kids don't belong to AFTRA, but at least one host of the series does, Hinrichs said.

    He said union officials intend to "have some conversations with the producers and those types of things" in an effort to determine whether AFTRA guarantees extended to the children performers on the show.

    PROTECTING RIGHTS

    "AFTRA members deplore and condemn the exploitation of children," national executive director Kim Roberts Hedgpeth said. "We are concerned about reports of abuse arising from 'Kid Nation,' which was produced under the AFTRA National Code of Fair Practices for Network Television Broadcasting.

    "Under this agreement, the host, announcer, reporters and other professional performers on reality and contest programming are specifically covered by the terms of the Network Code, while the amateur contestants are generally not," Hedgpeth added. "AFTRA is investigating whether the terms and conditions of the Network Code were violated in the production of 'Kid Nation.' We will take all legal and moral steps available to protect the rights of the performers and children on this program."

    So far, the controversy hasn't affected the show's premiere plans.

    "There's no change in the show's status," CBS spokesman Chris Ender said.

    Amid earlier reports of concerns over the kids' treatment on location, CBS characterized "Kid Nation" as "a voluntary television experience."

    The network added: "The series was filmed responsibly and within all applicable laws in the state of New Mexico at the time of the production. What was extraordinary about 'Kid Nation' was the behind-the-scenes support structure, which included on-site paramedics, a pediatrician, an animal-safety expert and a child psychologist, not to mention a roster of producers assigned to monitor the kids' behavior."

    As long ago as a July 18 press session during the Television Critics Assn. conference in Beverly Hills, CBS Entertainment president Nina Tassler found herself defending the reality series.

    "To really get out there and change the landscape of television, you have to sort of stir public debate," Tassler told the assembled press. "We know we're going to create some controversy. We know people are going to be talking, (and) it's good that we're talking."

    Reuters/Hollywood Reporter

    © Reuters 2007. All rights reserved.

  4. #14
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    I read in next week's TV Guide that there is a lot of controversy over the "so-called treatment" of the children and there is a possiblity (at this point very small) of pulling the show. Now being a bit of a cynic this is really great publicity for the show and folks who would not normally watch reality tv and especially if they are parents might be "hooked" into watching the show. Ratings = Money. Now would a producer stoop that low, be that shameless to produce publicity for their show by doing this??? Yeap! I think so.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  5. #15
    Leo
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    That would be the case, if this was something that CBS could at least anticipate, if not control to some degree. Honestly, though, that's giving them too much credit. It sounds like they underestimated how controversial it would be; and it would not be unprecedented for a controversial reality show to be pulled before airing. Anyone remember Welcome to the Neighborhood?

  6. #16
    FORT Fogey canadian_angel's Avatar
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    I guess what I don't understand through all of this, is why didn't they wait till the children were on summer holidays. Unless it's different in the states, here in Canada our kids don't get out until late May at the very earliest.

  7. #17
    She luvs me not?!?!?! Vonna's Avatar
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    Quote Originally Posted by canadian_angel;2548515;
    I guess what I don't understand through all of this, is why didn't they wait till the children were on summer holidays. Unless it's different in the states, here in Canada our kids don't get out until late May at the very earliest.
    New Mexico in June would be blistering hot, but maybe in Washington State or Maine might have worked.
    ______________________________ _____________
    In regards to parent complaints: Our children are such softies.......instant entertainment, instant food, instant money......I think this was a great idea.

    The kids were all old enough to pretty much know what they were getting in to. Parents don't want to see their children suffer (and I don't mean great bodily harm) the results from their own choices. An activity such as this can give kids a great amount of self confidence and a super sense of accomplishment from succeeding in difficult tasks.

    As the kids get older and come across some of life's trials, I'm sure this experience will give the kids confidence that they can make it through tough obstacles in life.

    I'm really looking forward to the show.
    Last edited by Vonna; 08-28-2007 at 11:04 AM.
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  8. #18
    FORT Fan Spad1918's Avatar
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    I've read reviews here and there that CBS should just cut it's losses before the avalanche of negative publicity and the backlash and not even air the show.

  9. #19
    chavy chaf chaf Asteroids Champion, Bejeweled 2 Champion, GalaGalaGa Champion, Add It Up Champion, Beat The Meter Champion, Bejeweled® 2 Action Champion, Little Protectors Champion spockwhat's Avatar
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    This is ridiculous.

    A child is the parent's responsibility, first and foremost. If you're going to send your child into something like this, you better be darn sure you know what you're getting them into, and willing to accept the consequences of signing them up in the first place.
    I agree with those that think many of the parents who are complaining got blinded by the idea of a little fame and some quick cash and completely ignored any downsides that could happen... to the possible detriment of their own kids.
    Also, that possibly their children didn't do well in the show and they are looking for someone to blame.

    My only concern is that some of these kids may be edited or portrayed negatively as they do in many of the reality shows we see, and I'm worried that this could be too hard on them emotionally. Once again, it's the parents responsibility to help them handle it, but I'm really hoping that if this thing airs, the media (and us!) will be sensitive to the fact that these are just children, and we treat them with kid-gloves, as it were.
    There are adults who have had difficulty handling their 15 minutes... lets not end up with any kids whose lives get ruined.

    However, if their parents deserve some criticism, I say we let them HAVE IT!
    Last edited by spockwhat; 08-30-2007 at 05:11 PM.

  10. #20
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    Re: Kid Nation in the Media

    Yet another story on this in the LA Times today (sorry I can't link to it) that sheds a little more light on the situation. I think most of the controversy was stirred up by the actors unions, who dislike reality programming for obvious reasons.

    Not saying the unions' points are right or wrong, but it does seem like the "concern for the children" is a little disingenuous.

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