+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
Like Tree6Likes

Thread: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

  1. #11
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,051

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    I must be in the minority, because I like Samuel on the show. I'm hopeful that they'll bring him and Damian back next season.

    I think the thing that a lot of people had problems with last season was that this isn't a "best" competition. It's about Ryan Murphy's taste, which often doesn't match the viewers'. If he can't see himself writing a character for someone, it doesn't matter to him how talented the person is. That being said, I can see any of the top 14 on the show in some capacity.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  2. #12
    FORT Fogey Jaceegirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,225

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    I must be in the minority, because I like Samuel on the show. I'm hopeful that they'll bring him and Damian back next season.

    I think the thing that a lot of people had problems with last season was that this isn't a "best" competition. It's about Ryan Murphy's taste, which often doesn't match the viewers'. If he can't see himself writing a character for someone, it doesn't matter to him how talented the person is. That being said, I can see any of the top 14 on the show in some capacity.
    ITA with you. I enjoyed both Samuel and Damian on the show as well as Alex when he played in the competition against them for Nationals. I think that since Ryan does the writing he needs to see something to write about. During the Glee Project last year I was hoping that Samuel would win, but I enjoyed Damien as well. I was glad that they both got a shot. I enjoyed last night's show and they certainly have a lot of talent in the top 14. What I am confused about is that they lost a lot of seniors. I know Ryan is writing a New York version for the 3, but what about the rest of the cast? Why is their only one spot open?

  3. #13
    FORT Fogey Air Blobs Easy Champion inthegarden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,159

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    I must be in the minority, because I like Samuel on the show. I'm hopeful that they'll bring him and Damian back next season.

    I think the thing that a lot of people had problems with last season was that this isn't a "best" competition. It's about Ryan Murphy's taste, which often doesn't match the viewers'. If he can't see himself writing a character for someone, it doesn't matter to him how talented the person is. That being said, I can see any of the top 14 on the show in some capacity.



    That is what I noticed during the casting special, while he thought they were all talented, the one thing that Ryan Murphy kept saying was...I can write about this one.

    I like Samuel and I thought he did fit into Glee. His character was shy, home schooled, Christian, and innocent which was a contradiction to his looks. I think that is what was so interesting to Ryan Murphy. Plus, he does have a great voice.
    Damien was an exchange student, that was an easy character to write about as well as Alex and his performance as Unique. Lindsay... well, she can really belt out a song.

  4. #14
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,051

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    Lea Michele Previews 'Stronger,' 'Inspirational' 'Glee Project' Cast

    The "Glee" actress, who is the first mentor on Season 2 of the Oxygen reality competition series, talks with THR about her experience.

    "This is going to suck for you guys because I don't know how you're going to narrow it down." That was Glee star Lea Michele's reaction to her first glimpse at meeting the Season 2 contestants for Oxygen's The Glee Project.

    Returning Tuesday night for its second season, the reality competition series that gives its winner a seven-episode arc on Fox's Glee expands from 12 to 14 contestants and features a cast, like the flagship series, that's rich in diversity.

    "The talent is just as great -- if not even stronger," Michele told The Hollywood Reporter ahead of the premiere, in which she appears as the season's first mentor. "All of these kids, their stories are so inspirational and they're so touching that I think people are just going to fall in love with all the contestants."

    After crowning all four of its finalists winners in some capacity last season, the second-year cast boasts newbie country crooners, Muslim singers, a Tisch graduate who's paralyzed from the neck down, a transgendered Jewish 21-year-old and a blind gospel singer, among others whose back stories each read like potential casting breakdowns for Glee.

    "[Glee/Glee Project casting director] Robert Ulrich was telling me about each one of the kids and about their stories and I was just blown away," Michele says of her time on set. "Blown away by the bravery of these kids to come on the show and really show who they are and tell their stories; it's really inspiring."

    The actress otherwise known as Rachel Berry says it's the contestants' individuality -- the theme of Tuesday's premiere -- that will best help them achieve their goal and win an arc on Glee, recommending that each of the 14 hopefuls show their stripes to executive producer and co-creator Ryan Murphy rather than hold back.

    "What Ryan loves to do more than anything is know who you are and write it into the show. Part of myself is in Rachel Berry; so many of the things I've done on the show are inspired by true stories," she says, pointing to Chris Colfer's experiences greatly influencing Kurt Hummel's story lines. "Ryan loves being inspired by what you can do and what's happened to you in your life so The Glee Project is an amazing opportunity for him to really be inspired by who these kids really are."

    With Season 1 co-winners Damian McGinty and Samuel Larsen each appearing in double their episode winnings and runners up Alex Newell and Lindsay Pearce entering for a pair each, Michele says their respective Glee characters -- Rory, Joe, Unique and Harmony -- were each inspired by who the kids are outside of the show with their Glee Project training helping with the transition to the Fox series' demanding schedule.

    "When each one came onto the show it was like on Day 1 they'd always been there," she notes. "They'd already worked with our choreographer [Glee Project's Zach Woodlee], learned what it's like to go into the recording studios and they're well groomed to be on our show. It's great because they seamlessly come in and don't have to learn the formula and it took us a really long time to get used to that."

    As for early front-runners from the expanded 11-episode season, Michele was diplomatic. "There were so many people I saw that could fit into the Glee cast that I literally told [producers] they have the hardest job. There are so many kids that I thought would be perfect on Glee."
    Lea Michele Previews 'Stronger,' 'Inspirational' 'Glee Project' Cast - Hollywood Reporter
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  5. #15
    FORT Fogey mesachick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    On my horse.
    Posts
    2,971

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    I must be in the minority, because I like Samuel on the show. I'm hopeful that they'll bring him and Damian back next season.

    I think the thing that a lot of people had problems with last season was that this isn't a "best" competition. It's about Ryan Murphy's taste, which often doesn't match the viewers'. If he can't see himself writing a character for someone, it doesn't matter to him how talented the person is. That being said, I can see any of the top 14 on the show in some capacity.
    I loved Samuel on the show, and I really liked how they wrote for Damian as well. I too hope we see them again next season! Samuel's character was supposed to be in 9th or 10th grade this past season I believe (LOL - cuz he so doesn't look that young), so he should be able to be on for a few more seasons.
    Ask me to show you poetry in motion, and I will show you a horse.

  6. #16
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,051

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    3 Chicago area wannabes compete on ‘The Glee Project’
    BY LORI RACKL TV Critic/lrackl@suntimes.com June 4, 2012 9:34PM

    Chalk it up to being in the right place — or plane — at the right time.

    Francis Parker High School student Michael Weisman was on a flight from Chicago to Los Angeles to visit family in 2010. A nearby passenger spotted his guitar case and asked the Andersonville teenager if he sang.

    “It was a totally random occurrence,” Weisman said. “I had no idea who he was.”

    Turns out he was Robert Ulrich, casting director for “Glee.”

    Ulrich had been in Chicago to attend open auditions for an Oxygen show called “The Glee Project,” where contestants would compete for a seven-episode guest-star gig on the Fox musical dramedy.

    Weisman, who’s in all three of his school’s choirs and is part of the Chicago-based blues band Rob Stone and the C-Notes, wound up auditioning for Ulrich at his L.A. studio.

    Being 17 at the time, Weisman wasn’t old enough for the first season of “The Glee Project.” Now, he’s 18 — and the youngest of 14 contenders duking it out on season two.

    During the series’ 11-week run, the hopefuls work with mentors to sing, dance and act while the creative forces of “Glee” assess their performance. “Glee” cast members also drop by to offer their two cents. (Lea Michele makes an appearance in the season premiere.)

    Each week, the three wan*na*bes who struggled the most compete in a last-chance routine to avoid getting cut by “Glee” co-creator Ryan Murphy. Murphy isn’t making his decision based solely on talent. He’s also looking for the person who will most inspire the writers charged with crafting a story arc for the winner’s “Glee” character.

    Murphy liked last year’s contestants so much, he picked two winners: Damian McGinty, who played an Irish exchange student, and Samuel Larsen, who did a turn as a devoted Christian helping Quinn recover from her car accident. Two runners-up also were rewarded with shorter stints on the show.

    This season’s crop of “Glee Project” contenders is a diverse bunch. Tyler is half black, half white, Jewish and transgender. Mario is blind. Paralyzed from the chest down, Ali has used a wheelchair since the age of 2.

    Charlie Lubeck, 23, has spent his life on meds to control a severe case of attention deficit disorder. The 2007 Homewood-Flossmoor High School grad also has a form of autism called Asperger’s syndrome.

    After studying acting at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Lubeck moved to New York to break into the theater world. His former drama teacher happened to be visiting and mentioned that “The Glee Project” was holding tryouts in New York the next day.

    Lubeck decided to give it a shot. After several hours of waiting in a slow-moving audition line, he nearly bailed.

    “We had ‘Lion King’ tickets,” said Lubeck, who ended up not using them. “I decided to stick it out in line. It was absolutely worth it.”

    Aylin Bayramoglu, 19, tried out for the show during Chicago’s open auditions at McCormick Place. She was majoring in vocal jazz performance at Roosevelt University at the time.

    “Singing professionally has been a dream of mine ever since I was born,” said Bayramoglu, who hails from a traditional Turkish family. The Muslim teen attended Catholic high school Loyola Academy in Wilmette, where she started the first female a cappella group, Nothing But Treble.

    “I choked in the first round,” she said, referring to her “Glee Project” audition. “I was about to sing Carrie Underwood’s ‘Before He Cheats.’ I opened my mouth and nothing came out. I was freaking out.”

    Bayramoglu, who’s auditioned for just about every singing competition on television, eventually collected herself and tried again. This time, it worked.

    A self-described flirt, Bayramoglu isn’t sure how her family will react to seeing her on the show.

    “It’s going to be interesting,” she said. “I don’t know if they’re going to approve of everything. They’re old-school Turkish.”
    3 Chicago area wannabes compete on
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  7. #17
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,051

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    The Glee Project's Tyler Ford Speaks with GLAAD
    Thursday, June 7, 2012 - 3:17pm by Megan Townsend, GLAAD's Entertainment Media Fellow

    The Glee Project's second season premiered this week and the cast includes 21-year-old multi-racial transgender contestant Tyler Ford. Tyler, a student at Vanderbilt University, has been performing for 11 years and lists his biggest musical influences as Lady Gaga and Sia. He landed in the bottom three during the first episode, but saved himself from elimination after a performance of the Jackson 5 hit "ABC." Tyler spoke exclusively with GLAAD about his story and his Glee Project experience and hopes. Check out what Tyler had to say below and catch him on new episodes of The Glee Project on Oxygen, Tuesday nights at 10.

    GLAAD: What drew you to taking part in The Glee Project?

    Tyler Ford: I've always loved music and I've always had a passion for performing. Glee is the ultimate performance role for me because it requires the actors to hone their craft in singing, acting, and dancing. I love to push myself to grow as a person and performer, and landing a role on Glee would be an absolutely amazing performing, learning, and growing experience. I also really enjoy that The Glee Project looks within people for inspiration to create a character. The mentors don't try to change us into something we aren't - they truly want us to be ourselves so that they can be inspired to write a character for us.

    GLAAD: What kind of themed episodes will we be seeing this season on The Glee Project? If you could pick your own theme, what would you like to celebrate?

    TF: You'll be seeing some themes from Season 1, such as "Individuality," "Dance-ability," "Vulnerability," and "Sexuality," but there will also be some really awesome and challenging new themes for Season 2! If I could pick my own theme, it would be "Musicality." We'd be challenged to write and perform our own songs. Maybe we'd be given some non-musical props and would have to find a way to make them musical and incorporate them into our performances.

    GLAAD: What would you like viewers to take away from watching this season of The Glee Project and your role on it?

    TF: I want people to know that being transgender is a normal part of everyday life. Every person in this world has a story, and being transgender just happens to be part of some of our stories. I want to inspire people who feel like outsiders to pursue what they love, no matter how hard others try to stop them.

    GLAAD: How old were you when you came out? How did your friends and family react?

    TF: I came out as a lady-loving person at 17. A few of my friends were uncomfortable with it, but most of my friends and family were unfazed. Coming out as transgender was definitely a longer, more difficult process. I lost a lot of old friends who "disagreed" with my identity. Most of my family supported me in my transition, which was and is awesome. Coming out brought me closer to my true friends, and distanced me from those who brought negativity into my life.

    GLAAD: What do you think of the LGBT representation and storylines on Glee?

    TF: Glee has more LGBT representation than most shows I've seen, so that's awesome. The show is lacking in the "BTQ" half of "LGBTQ," but hopefully I can add some spice there! I would definitely love to see more trans* and queer characters - especially people of color. Santana is my favorite character because underneath her rudeness and defensiveness lies a very vulnerable, raw person who is dealing with her intersecting identities and insecurities. I've loved watching her story unfold. I'm also a huge fan of Klaine (Kurt & Blaine). They're both amazing individually and as a couple.

    GLAAD: If you win the multi episode role on Glee, what would you like your character/storyline to be like?

    TF: I would honestly love to play any character on Glee. I would also love to increase transgender visibility and play a character who either A. is having a hard time coming out, dealing with transitioning, etc. B. is having trouble reconciling his feminine and masculine aspects due to societal pressure and bullying, or C. just happens to be transgender, but his story focuses more on other struggles he's having (family life, love life, etc.). At this point, I like the reconciling-feminine-and-masculine-aspects-storyline best. I could sit and write storylines for hours, but everything comes down to Ryan Murphy's writing and decision-making.

    GLAAD: What would you like to tell LGBT fans of Glee and The Glee Project?

    TF: Don't give up on your dreams. Do what you love and stay positive. Always be true to yourself no matter how hard the battle is - your life is your own, and you should make it as enjoyable as possible!
    The Glee Project's Tyler Ford Speaks with GLAAD | GLAAD
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  8. #18
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,051

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    Hating Glee, But Loving The Glee Project: A Viewer's Dilemma
    Sadie Gennis - Jun 18, 2012 09:15 PM ET

    When Glee first premiered, the show-tunes nerd inside me was thrilled. I've always been an avid fan of special musical episodes, so the prospect of having a weekly series that was a musical each outing made my heart grow three sizes.

    For most of the first season, Glee lived up to all my expectations. The songs were fun, the dancing was great and the characters were just campy enough to suspend my disbelief at the show's more unrealistic aspects (for a club with no budget they sure have access to a lot of nice costumes). Unfortunately, by Season 2 Glee had lost its edge. Enter Oxygen's reality casting show The Glee Project. Premiering only a matter of weeks after the finale of Glee's second season, The Glee Project accomplished all Glee originally set out to do.

    Here's an examination of what should have been two of Glee's greatest strengths, but unfortunately became its downfall... and how The Glee Project stepped in to become the true star of the feel-good underdog musical TV genre:

    Assignment No. 1: Subverting Stereotypes

    How Glee Failed the Test: The series began focusing so much on how eclectic the characters were in an effort to promote diversity, that instead of subverting stereotypes, it achieved the opposite. Glee soon became overly preachy, with the quirky outcasts that once butted heads now sentimentally embracing each other's differences, promoting a magical, clique-free world where the evil cheerleading coach reforms, bad boys sing Bob Marley for community service and a jock becomes stepbrothers with a flamboyant theater boy. Case in point in is how the show fails in its depiction of paraplegics. Wheelchair-bound A/V nerd Artie (Kevin McHale) never truly accepts his disability, despite Glee's repeated message to embrace everyone's individual differences. Instead, Season 1's episode "Dream On" chronicles his dream to become a dancer... but he doesn't achieve it by learning new ways to dance with his chair and accept his condition. No, instead we get a dream sequence in which shy, disabled Artie regains use of his legs and becomes a much more stereotypically masculine dance leader of a flash mob.

    How The Glee Project Made the Grade: The contestants featured on the reality competition show are real-life versions of the underdogs that Glee attempts — and fails — to celebrate. The current season features a transgender male, a blind performer and contestants of various body types. Because these aren't successful actors pretending to outcasts, The Glee Project is able to actually inspire its audience to accept their cast's individual differences instead of making them simply groan with clichés. In contrast to Glee's Artie, Glee Project's wheelchair-confined Ali doesn't display any desire to conform to the traditional notion of what makes a dancer and while she seeks to be more than just "that girl in the wheelchair," she never shows any bitterness towards her disability. Her inclusion on the reality show teaches paraplegics and viewers alike that, unlike on Glee, you don't need a dream sequence to dance or be a star. If you're talented and work hard, you can be just as tough a competitor as everyone else.

    Assignment No. 2: Competition! Drama!


    How Glee Failed the Test: The emotional drama and competitive attitude that once drove the plot of Glee (Sue and Will's rivalry, Terri's fake pregnancy, love triangles galore) began slowly disappearing on the Fox hit until the show has become more of a cheesy afterschool special than a prime-time musical dramedy. The members of New Directions have taken their beliefs in acceptance and inclusion too far. In the Season 3 episode "Nationals," Vocal Adrenaline's star drag performer Unique (played by Glee Project winner Alex Newell) questions why Kurt (Chris Colfer) and Mercedes (Amber Riley) would want to help her, since though they're "supposed to be enemies." Mercedes replies simply, "Yeah, but that's now how we roll in the New Directions." Her answer, however good-natured and respectable, demonstrates how Glee's preachy message of acceptance has since dulled the drama of the once cutting-edge series. Heck — even Glee club nemesis Sue Sylvester (Jane Lynch) has joined the cause of Mr. Schue (Matthew Morrison) and the gang! Where's the passion? The backstabbing?

    How The Glee Project Made the Grade: As with any other self-respecting reality show, The Glee Project, on the other hand, is dripping with drama. From real life love triangles — this season driven mainly by the brazen flirtation of Aylin — to the contestants' snarky comments, the show is first and foremost a fierce competition with occasional musical interludes. And fortunately, it is not lacking for villains. The show's choreographer Zach Woodlee makes Sue look like a marshmallow. His catty honesty, along with the stern critiques of vocal coach Nikki Anders, push the contestants to their limits, whereas Mr. Schue prefers the "We're all winners if we try" method of coaching. While the latter's approach might be better for his fictional students' self-esteem, it sure doesn't make for entertaining television.

    All of this is not to say that Glee has no redeeming qualities. The bond between Kurt and his dad Burt (Mike O'Malley) always brings tears to my eyes while the complexity of Santana (Naya Rivera) and Brittany's (Heather Morris) relationship is a refreshing change of pace from most television depictions of sexuality.

    To summarize, Glee is not the worst show in the world. The Glee Project is just better.
    Hating Glee, But Loving The Glee Project: A Viewer's Dilemma - Today's News: Our Take | TVGuide.com

    I think the writer definitely has some good points, especially about Glee. I find myself enjoyed TGP much more than the last season of Glee.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  9. #19
    FORT Fogey Debb70's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    9,795

    Re: The Glee Project - Season 2 news and talk

    Has anyone checked out the video from the show tonight? It's available On Demand. Can't wait to see how it came together.
    Click to see Spoiler:
    Everyone was amazing.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.