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  1. #3061
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    Declawing is a controversial subject. I have friends who had their cats declawed and their cats are all fine--done by reputable vets who checked the kittens out thoroughly before and after the procedure. But they were declawed young -- not sure how young though (apparently it hurts more when they're older).

    Our cat is not declawed, but we got him when he was almost a year old and that's how he came. Scratching posts are good up to a certain point but if you have a cat with claws, you have to be willing to put up with a few dings around the house (just as you would have to put up with children occasionally writing with crayons on the wall). I've done the double-sided tape trick, which works to a certain extent, and I've also done the foil trick (cats don't like foil, so they won't step where foil is). But I can't cover all the good furniture in foil or double faced tape--I'll look like totally looney tunes! So if he scratches at a chair leg every now and again, it's not that big a deal to me. As long as he's not doing it every day.

    He's pretty good about not ruining the house, but there are MAJOR claw marks on my wall below one particularly high window that he likes to jump into and sit in. He watches the whole neighborhood from there. I'm annoyed by the claw marks in the wall, but I'm also kinda proud that my big boy can jump that high!

    Having a pet can be a lot of work. I have to steam clean the carpet more often than I'd like after he throws up furballs (and he always does this on the carpet, never on the tile or hardwood floors). I have to vacuum all the time, too (I'm allergic to cats).

    But he's a good ol' boy. And damn warm during the winter!

  2. #3062
    Endlessly ShrinkingViolet's Avatar
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    Here is more information about declawing. Information is a good thing.

    http://www.declawing.com/

    Your cat's claw is not a toenail. It is actually closely adhered to the bone. So closely adhered that to remove the claw, the last bone of your the cat's claw has to be removed. Declawing is actually an amputation of the last joint of your cat's "toes".
    Before reading up on the declawing process, I thought it was simply the removal of the "nail." Once I read that the joint is amputated, that was enough for me not to consider it any further. Our vet also said that once cats are declawed, they tend to bite harder.

    I have nice furniture that I didn't want destroyed, and I was able to train our cat not to scratch the furniture. I took her to her post and held her paws, showing her how to scratch whenever she made an attempt at my couch (her favorite spot). I always gave her a treat and praised her. We've had the cat for three years, and all my furniture is intact. Her scratching poles (made out of the back of carpet) have been recovered many times, as she has shredded them to pieces. I am reminded that is how my furniture could look. I figure if this wild-spirited cat can be trained, any cat can. Sometimes she does a half-hearted attempt at scratching her post just to get a treat. She's a case!

    P.S. Having a can filled with a couple coins to toss in the general direction of the cat when he/she is misbehaving is a great deterrent, also. Couple that with the scratching post, and it's a sure-fire winner.

  3. #3063
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShrinkingViolet View Post
    P.S. Having a can filled with a couple coins to toss in the general direction of the cat when he/she is misbehaving is a great deterrent, also. Couple that with the scratching post, and it's a sure-fire winner.
    Your cat sounds better behaved than ours.

    No, ours is overall a realy good cat. Has a personality like a dog (loves to be around people and follows them around--he will find the one person who hates cats and latch onto them). Does your cat ever get stuck to the scratching post? Sometimes he just looks so pathetic!

    I squirt a water bottle (you know, the kind with the nozzle at the end so the water mists out) in the general direction of the cat when he's being bad, and he looks appropriately contrite. For a second.

  4. #3064
    Endlessly ShrinkingViolet's Avatar
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    I tried the water squirter and got no response whatsoever, except for a damp cat. I got more reponse from raising my voice, and then she just looked at me and kept on doing whatever evil deed she was doing (trying to be a curtain climber, etc.)

  5. #3065
    FORT Regular Butterfly723's Avatar
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    PLEASE don't de-claw you kitty!! It is like cutting off their fingers. In my house the cats are more important than the furniture. My cats always use their scratching post.. The Vet that I work for refuses to do it. And you have to think about the possibility of your cat getting outside, he has absoultely no defense if he has no claw, plus if a dog is chasing him, he will be unable to climb a tree or fence to get away. I will buy you a scratching post and mail it to you!!!
    Last edited by Butterfly723; 08-28-2006 at 07:39 PM.

  6. #3066
    FORT Newbie adamant's Avatar
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    Make sure to rub the catnip on the scratching post as a lure for the kitten. And when first training her, leave the post right out in the open - when she gets used to scratching it you can gradually move it to a more out of the way place.

    Please do not de-claw your kitten.

  7. #3067
    FORT Regular Butterfly723's Avatar
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    I wanted to let you know that I am totally serious about buying you a scratching post.

  8. #3068
    Teach your children Uncle David's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M_shelll View Post
    How old does a kitty have to be before it can be de-clawed?
    M_shell, I'm so excited for you. I know how much you've been looking forward to getting a new kitty.

    When Greta and Ella went in to be neutered the vet offered to declaw them and implant a tracking chip. This was at about 4 1/2 months old. Since I never intend to let the kittens outside the patio I opted not to have the chip implant. Perhaps when they are older, but not yet. As to the declaw, I don't believe in it.

    As you all know I'm a rather large man and I have an even larger voice. When I yell 'stop it' I usually get their attention. If they go back to scratching on the furniture I lunge at them. That's more than enough to stop them. However, they don't claw the furniture often. I bought these cardboard scratching boxes. One lies flat on the floor while the other is slanted. They actually prefer those to the furniture.
    The funniest thing about this particular signature is that by the time you realise it doesn't say anything it's too late to stop reading it.

  9. #3069
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    My big boy scratches my legs sometimes when he jumps on my lap. But he seems to be cognizant of the fact that he needs to be careful with me. If I've got jeans on, he'll just hop on. But if I've got shorts on or light pants in the summer, he almost doesn't know what to do 'cause he knows he'll get kicked off the lap if he claws into my leg! He's not nearly this cautious with my husband. He just jumps and scratches.

    I know you're all anti-declawing...and like I said, my cat has all his claws, too...but I think M_shell needs to talk to her kitty's vet, learn about the pros and cons and then make her own decision. You need to think about your lifestyle. Will it bother you (or your boyfriend) if your kitty is one of those kitties that occasionally scratches the furniture or curtain? If that's not that big a deal, letting her keep her claws shouldn't be a dealbreaker.

  10. #3070
    Premium Member dagwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M_shelll View Post
    Okay so I am soooo excited now, I am 90% sure that I will have a kitten by this time NEXT WEEK!
    But first I have a quick question: How old does a kitty have to be before it can be de-clawed? If you're getting a kitten fixed at a few months can they de-claw it at the same time?
    Congrats on the new kitty, M_shell. If I were you, I would talk to your vet about declawing. Weigh the pros and cons and make an educated decision. Declawing is a very controversial subject and there are lots of people that feel strongly about it. Scratching posts don't always work. I have a scratching post and my cats divide their time between it and my couch. Nothing works for me, I think they do it when I am not there because I yell when they do it in front of me. Cats have their own personalities and will do what they do.
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