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  1. #1761
    Adelitas Way 7.14.09 libra1022's Avatar
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    A while back I had mentioned Soft Paws for kitties in this thread and now I've finally gotten a bit of experience with them..
    My dear friends that just got 2 ragdoll kittens were seriously interested in declawing them With much begging and persuasion from me they are now using pretty hot pink Soft Paws on them instead and they are doing GREAT! It seems like it may add up a bit moneywise ($35 for the vet to put them on every six weeks), but they're happy with them and I'm happy that they listened to my fight and decided not to declaw

  2. #1762
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    libra1022 Good for you.. declawing is horrific! I didn't know soft paws had to be put on by a vet. I thought you could do it yourself. Are they glued on then? I never knew!
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  3. #1763
    Caged Mah Jongg Solitaire Champion Maveno's Avatar
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    Ok..after reading everyone talk about "greenies" in this thread, last night while watching Anderson Cooper 360, I was all ears when they had them as the topic of discussion.
    For some reason, I can't get the transcripts to come up on yesterday's interview.. but there is an article that I can post.
    Apparently there's a big problem with them, in which the makers of the chew toys are saying, "the benefits (less dental visits) outway the unfortunate deaths that have occurred". That's what he said last night on the interview.

    So anyway.. I hope everyone who uses them, knows the risks and dangers. Here's the article.

    CNN.com

    Owners: Dog treats killed our pets


    Dog chewing on Greenie, the best
    selling dog treat in the United States





    KANSAS CITY, Missouri (CNN) -- At least 13 dogs have died after being fed the top-selling pet treat in the country, owners and veterinarians have told CNN.

    The problem comes because the treats, called Greenies, become lodged in a dog's esophagus or intestine and then some veterinarians say they don't break down.

    "I know they are marketed in saying that they do digest. Certainly the ones that we've taken out, esophageal or intestinal, that have been in for days are still very hard," Brendan McKiernan, a board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialist from Denver, Colorado, told CNN. (Watch a vet retrieve a two-day old, undigested Greenie from a dog -- 7:40)

    Greenies recommends owners check that the treats are chewed and Joe Roetheli - who launched the brand as a treat that can freshen a dog's breath and clean its teeth - said it was important to pick the correct chew for a particular dog. There are 7 different sizes to choose from depending on the size of the dog.

    But most of the dog owners CNN talked to say they did follow package instructions and they still had a problem.

    Mike Eastwood and his wife, Jenny Reiff, recently filed a $5 million lawsuit in New York, blaming Greenies for the intestinal blockage that caused the death of their dog Burt.

    "I'm mad that their packaging states that the product is 100 percent edible, highly digestible and veterinarian approved, yet our dog died of it," Eastwood told CNN.

    S&M NuTec, which manufactures the toothbrush-shaped chew, won't comment on the case but in court papers denied the allegations.

    Roetheli said the focus should be on the dental benefits and Greenies are saving dogs' lives by lowering the risk of periodontal disease.

    He says feeding Greenies is far safer than putting a dog under anesthesia to clean teeth.

    "Dogs really love the product!" he said. "They do a very effective job of cleaning teeth and freshening breath."

    Any suggestion that Greenies are defective was rejected by Roetheli, who developed Greenies with his wife, Judy.

    "Our product is safe. It is used every day by thousands of dogs, millions a week and it is basically a very safe product."

    A CNN investigation uncovered 40 cases since 2003 where a veterinarian had to extract a Greenie from a dog after the treat became lodged either in the animal's esophagus or intestine. In 13 of those cases, the pet died.

    One of those was Tyson, Josh Glass and Leah Falls' 8-month-old boxer, who was taken to Brent-Air Animal Hospital in Los Angeles, California, where vet Dr. Kevin Schlanger found the animal had a blocked intestine.

    "It was very clear that it was something dense and firm that had caused the obstruction," Schlanger said. He removed a Greenie from the intestine.

    McKiernan's says his Denver clinic has seen at least seven cases in the past five years, which he says is an unusually high number. That prompted him to start researching and writing a paper to warn other veterinarians of the problem.

    He says his research, which he hopes to get published in a veterinary journal, shows compressed vegetable chew treats, of which Greenies is the most popular, are now the third biggest cause of esophageal obstruction in dogs behind bones and fish hooks.

    The federal Food and Drug Administration says it's looking into eight consumer complaints about Greenies but has no formal investigation.

    The issue has also been the topic of news reports across the country.

    The chews are made of digestible products like wheat gluten and fiber, experts say, but the molding process makes the treat very firm and hard.

    Roetheli, who runs S&M NuTec from Kansas City, Missouri, says Greenies do break down when properly chewed and swallowed by a dog.

    He told CNN that any product has the potential to cause an obstruction in a dog and that Greenies packaging warns dog owners to monitor their dog to ensure the treat is adequately chewed. "Gulping any item can be harmful or even fatal to a dog," the package says.

    The company's Web site addresses the issue in its FAQ section with the question "When giving an animal Greenies, does it affect their digestive system?" The answer "The only time dogs would be unable to digest anything would be if they didn't chew it up before they swallowed it. Canine and Feline Greenies are highly digestible when chewed."

    The company says the number of complaints it has received is very low in relation to the vast numbers of treats sold, and CNN spoke with several vets who recommended Greenies.

    Introduced in 1998, we found Greenies now selling for about $16 a pound. Last year, 325 million individual treats were sold around the world, nearly three times the sales of its nearest competitor Milk Bone, according to the marketing company Euromonitor International.

    "At the end of the day ... literally millions of Greenies are enjoyed by dogs on a weekly basis with absolutely no incidents," company vet Brad Quest told CNN.
    All things beautiful do not have to be full of color to be noticed; in
    life that which is unnoticed has the most power.

  4. #1764
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasfosprincess
    I got a puppy. Jafo rescued it from the humane society. I say rescued cause she was new and scared to death. She still is but started warming up a BIT. She should be a great dog.
    JP has a puppy Do not feed him greenies! See Maveno's post. What a horrible way for your pet to die. There's obviously something wrong with the treat if it doesn't break up properly or digest safely, IMO.
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  5. #1765
    Adelitas Way 7.14.09 libra1022's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskitty View Post
    libra1022 Good for you.. declawing is horrific! I didn't know soft paws had to be put on by a vet. I thought you could do it yourself. Are they glued on then? I never knew!
    You can do it yourself...and hopefully they will once their kitties grow up some and get a bit calmer (right now they are 6 & 7 months and insanely playful). They glue right on the nails and just grow off as the nails grow, or possibly get lost as the craziest kitten has already done with one of her's.

  6. #1766
    Caged Mah Jongg Solitaire Champion Maveno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by libra1022 View Post
    (right now they are 6 & 7 months and insanely playful).
    Awwww! You're killin' me with all this kitty talk libs! I'm insanely jealous that you have kittens ripping up your house and I don't!

    I can't WAIT to have a farm.

    Oh, and I'll be on the porch doing this..
    All things beautiful do not have to be full of color to be noticed; in
    life that which is unnoticed has the most power.

  7. #1767
    MRD
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    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
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    We have 2 jack russell terriers. The calmest ones anyone's ever seen. I dont know how we got to be so lucky as they are not bouncing off the walls most of the time. They do get rowdy, but they also snuggle and cuddle.

    Our female has been plagued for years with tummy troubles, so the vet tells us to give her rolaids. Well her son, would eat the damn rolaid out of my hand like it was a piece of steak, but miss finicky has to have it hidden in something and then roots around until the offending rolaid is out of her cheese in this case.
    I went through a whole cheese stick today trying to get her to eat a rolaid (I cut the pill in half) and I have to give Bogie, the boy cheese too as he is so freaking jealous that Rosie might get something, so I'm trying to keep him from eating the rolaid cheese while I try to get her to eat it.

    I felt like I had just done the women's downhill or something by the time I was finished.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  8. #1768
    Caged Mah Jongg Solitaire Champion Maveno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog View Post
    We have 2 jack russell terriers. The calmest ones anyone's ever seen. I dont know how we got to be so lucky as they are not bouncing off the walls most of the time. They do get rowdy, but they also snuggle and cuddle.

    Our female has been plagued for years with tummy troubles, so the vet tells us to give her rolaids. Well her son, would eat the damn rolaid out of my hand like it was a piece of steak, but miss finicky has to have it hidden in something and then roots around until the offending rolaid is out of her cheese in this case.
    I went through a whole cheese stick today trying to get her to eat a rolaid (I cut the pill in half) and I have to give Bogie, the boy cheese too as he is so freaking jealous that Rosie might get something, so I'm trying to keep him from eating the rolaid cheese while I try to get her to eat it.

    I felt like I had just done the women's downhill or something by the time I was finished.
    I'm jealous of you too.. for having dogs. Not feasible where we live right now.

    What has always worked for me is to hide the pill in a meat "ball" or a piece of hotdog and toss it up to them so they have to catch it in the air, usually they just gulp it down. Especially if you have more pieces to toss up, they'll wolf it down quick so they can get the next piece. With the rolaid, maybe break it up in quarters and hide it in things to toss up. Maybe cheese balls.. just toss'm up in the air!
    All things beautiful do not have to be full of color to be noticed; in
    life that which is unnoticed has the most power.

  9. #1769
    MRD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maveno View Post
    I'm jealous of you too.. for having dogs. Not feasible where we live right now.

    What has always worked for me is to hide the pill in a meat "ball" or a piece of hotdog and toss it up to them so they have to catch it in the air, usually they just gulp it down. Especially if you have more pieces to toss up, they'll wolf it down quick so they can get the next piece. With the rolaid, maybe break it up in quarters and hide it in things to toss up. Maybe cheese balls.. just toss'm up in the air!

    That works with Bogie as he gulps down anything (the dog once ate a plastic easter egg for gods sake), but Rosie lets the meat or hot dog or cheese, whatever it is bounce off her nose and roll over the ground, where she then daintily walks over, sniffs it and either turns up her nose or licks it to determine if her royal self will deem to eat something as lowly as a hot dog. She does not jump up for food nor does she beg. She just stands there staring holes in you. Meanwhile Bogie is doing his self taught begging tricks that work for anyone that comes over to the house. He is shameless for food. She can't be bothered is her attitude. This dog is so dainty, so finicky she should be a cat. We've always said she's a cat trapped in a dog's body. And she is the QUEEN of the house. Her son is twice her size and she keeps him in line. She thinks she's the size of a rottweiler and we've been banned from the dog beach because her agressiveness with the big dogs is not tolerated. She's very mild mannered with us, but she does let other dogs know that she is NUMERO UNO and they should lick her little royal feet.
    She's really pretty funny. And she LOVES to dress up, but the boy hates it and acts embarrassed, but he also hates for her to wear her sweaters and coats and removes them. They are awful but fun to watch.

    We've always had dogs, but these are the first Jacks we've had and I think we will always have Jacks. They are just so much fun and now we know quite a few people with them because they fell in love with our two.

    And now I'm sure you all have figured out where my screen name came from by now.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  10. #1770
    Wait, what? ArchieComic Fan's Avatar
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    rosiedog - your Jack's look and sound adorable. One reason I never got one was because of the reputation they have for high energy. I'm pretty low key, don't do walks (we have a yard). We had two min schnauzers (still have one), which also can be high energy, and luckily they were both low key. And same as your situation, one was the mom, the other the son. The mom recently passed away from cancer and her son is a bit depressed but we have a cat now too so he's not totally alone. But it's not a good fit for him companion wise, I can tell he only tolerates the cat but really has no interest in him as a playmate.

    But just like your dogs, when I was giving her medicine, I always had to give the male food too so he wouldn't feel left out. She was pretty good about taking her medicine though until near the end. She got to where she wouldn't eat much and if there was a pill in it (especially since her pills had a tendency to be bitter) she wouldn't eat it at all.

    What might work for your female's rolaid is to buy a pill crusher and crush it up into a fine powder and then mix it with food. I tried this recently when I had to give the cat a pill, but he wasn't having none of my ingenuity - he knew something was there. The vet suggested, and this may work for your dog, to let the pill liquify in about 1 ml of water in one of those liquid medicine injectors and squirt the pill / water combo into his mouth. I'm going to try that when he gets his second pill on the 18th.

    By the way, do Jack Russells shed? I swore I wouldn't get another dog after the one just passed because it is so heartbreaking to go through but eventually I know her son will need another companion. I've thought about a Dachshund but hear they have lots of back problems. I don't want a big dog or one too tiny and I have minor allergies so a lot of shedding would be a problem for me. Also, are they hard to housebreak?
    Last edited by ArchieComic Fan; 02-16-2006 at 02:35 PM.

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