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Thread: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

  1. #41
    FORT Fogey Dragonlady's Avatar
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    Rattus and Ellen, you are both so very right about that. But as long as we just miss them with good fond memories rather than think life itself was better, we're ok.
    We have to remember that we viewed (& remember) those days with innocent child's eyes. What did we know about being able to pay the bills, etc.?
    We didn't have many problems, except maybe we forgot our homework, or our sibling is picking on us.
    I personally don't know how I lived without Google!!! I truly love having instant access to any answer I want to know.

  2. #42
    Ellie May SugarMama's Avatar
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonlady View Post
    ...
    We have to remember that we viewed (& remember) those days with innocent child's eyes. What did we know about being able to pay the bills, etc.?...
    True. Reminds me also - I remember when the first credit card came out - Bank Americard. All of those years, you saved up and paid cash for most things - unless your local general store or grocery let you run a tab.

    We did without a lot until my parents had enough to cash to pay for it - that second car, air-conditioning, new clothes, etc. While we had to wait longer for new things, massive debt wasn't nearly the problem it is today.
    To return evil for good is devilish; to return good for good is human; to return good for evil is Divine - Alistair Begg

  3. #43
    FORT Fogey KatesMom's Avatar
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    Quote Originally Posted by SugarMama View Post
    HAHA....who remember THIS?

    The first at-home hair dryer? It was a box with hose similar to a clothes dryer, only smaller, attached to a gigantic hair bonnet (to accompany the large rollers).

    It was an amazing innovation at the time! No longer did a lady/girl have to wait 8 hours for her hair to dry on the curlers or go to the beauty shop and have her hair done. She could roll her hair at home, plug in this box, place the bonnet over her curlers, turn on the switch, and...within an hour or so have perfectly set hair! Not including hair spray, of course.

    I remember it was such a grand invention! And later came the "hand-held hair dryer"....the rest is history
    Oh man, we had one of those and I used it when I was younger. That would be like 30 years ago, which I think was long after it actually came out!!

  4. #44
    Ellie May SugarMama's Avatar
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    Remembering these old good times...

    I've been considering this. I feel more enthusiastic to share with my children - they need to know that times WERE and COULD BE better than today...just because some of the kinder, gentler aspects of life are a few years past doesn't mean they can't be regained for them and their children someday.

    We've been remembering - perhaps because we've been missing - maybe we can merge the life of the microchip and the simple concepts of happiness and pleasure and responsibility for today's generation? Or is that just not possible (sad if so )
    To return evil for good is devilish; to return good for good is human; to return good for evil is Divine - Alistair Begg

  5. #45
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    I think it's mostly a need for balance, a need that's probably always existed. We simply have to remember that it's great to be able to do things quickly with a few strokes of a keyboard, but that it's also great to take the time to do things at a more leisurely pace. I love my computer keyboard, but I love my piano keyboard too--and you've got to take the time to practice if you want to play piano; there's just no rushing it. I'm incredibly grateful that I can order things on-line that I'd never have access to in other ways--and that I can make choices to support charities with my shopping--but I like going to local stores too (and local art sales and craft sales and farmers' markets too). I depend on my microwave, but I like cooking from scratch at the stove too, and I think it's valuable to know how to do that. I realize I could just send e-cards, but I like snail mail and assume others do too, and I even enjoy taking the time to make cards, just because it's like being back in art class again.

    Sometimes I think people have gotten to concerned with doing something all the time too. There's nothing wrong with taking the time to do nothing either, so long as you don't make a career out of it.

    As for responsibility, I'm fortunate to know some kids (and parents) who are still managing that. Like the girls across the street who still make May baskets (and included treats for my dog in mine). Or the young woman who kept whispering to me at her bridal shower that it was just overwhelming to receive so many nice gifts and congratulations at once. Or the colleague who said that even if it's inconvenient for himself or his wife, if their small son misbehaves in public, one of them takes him out until he can get himself under control, because it's not fair to other people who have come to the event/restaurant/whatever to have to deal with an upset toddler--and because they wanted to establish early on that things like eating out were a treat and required particular standards of behavior. Or a former student leaving thank you notes for his teachers. Maybe slowing down to appreciate what you have and what you've gotten has something to do with that too.
    inthegarden and SugarMama like this.

  6. #46
    Mixing Old Fashioneds PhoneGrrrl's Avatar
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    Quote Originally Posted by inthegarden View Post
    At dusk, they would drive around in big fog trucks and spray for mosquitoes. We would stand in our yard, wait for the trucks and then run from the fog.
    Trust me, this still happens. I was out walking my dog a few weeks ago and we literally ran from street to street to avoid the fogger truck. That crap is nasty. If you're in a car and are behind it, you have to close the vents and slow down. It is entirely too hot here to keep the windows open, so at least it doesn't come in the house.

    Quote Originally Posted by SugarMama View Post
    What about console stereos? Those 6-feet long rectangles that housed a radio (am AND fm), a turntable (er, record player) and in ours...drum roll... a new-fangled 8-track tape player! We were all so excited
    But those things last! I've got my grandmother's from the early 70's (or whenever 8 tracks came out) in my spare room and play my 80's & 90's remixes on the turntable. Depeche Mode early 90s remixes play great on them. My sing-along scares the pets, but that's their problem.

  7. #47
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    I actually heard one of those console stereos in action yesterday, at an antique store that was going out of business. I didn't realize it was providing the music in the store for some time. I assumed it was coming from some modern system, because it sounded great--and the thing had to be forty years old if it was a day. Two kids started goofing around with the record arm at one point, apparently completely unaware that they could be scratching the record by doing so (or they didn't care--but given their ages, they may never have seen a record player/stereo in operation before, so I don't blame them so much as their parents for not correcting them). But perhaps the store didn't care all that much, since it was going out of business.

    Anyway, the console cabinet was pretty hideous--obviously a product of its times--but it must have been a top of the line sound system in its day to sound that good now. And yes, it came complete with an 8-track system as well as record player and radio.

  8. #48
    Vidiot 13 is a Winner Champion Poppy Fields's Avatar
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    On reflection, I realize that my nostalgia for bygone times is all about the fact that I was care free then.
    cablejockey likes this.

  9. #49
    Ellie May SugarMama's Avatar
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    Quote Originally Posted by Poppy Fields View Post
    On reflection, I realize that my nostalgia for bygone times is all about the fact that I was care free then.
    That's true. Question is: was it our youth, the social environment of the time, the simplicity of lifestyle compared to today, or a combination?

    I say a combination. I was allowed to experience my youth as a youth, I didn't have to grow up "too fast" - there are some things that, once learned, can't be taken back. You can't put the genie back into the bottle. Those few extra youthful, innocent years allowed for more pleasant, worry-free experiences weaved into our fabric. I've never been able to sit down with my children and watch television in the evening, as was the routine when I was growing up. Shows aren't appropriate for children, in my opinion, and what they want to watch is too immature for an adult. We have just lost that bonding period.

    The social environment to me means a time when kids weren't allowed to do whatever they felt like, be it in school, in the restaurant, in the supermarket, whatever. There were expectations, and parents (as well as officials) enforced them...we learned that there were consequences for misbehavior. Civilized.

    Our lifestyles were simpler. Things were not as "immediate" as they are today, so we learned to wait and have patience. Remember letters in the mail? While we have wonderful, immediate access to things today, in some ways NOT having that taught us to use our time more wisely - just my opinion, because I seem to waste so much of it now Immediate access also breeds the expectations of immediate gratification...you should see my kids when the power goes out, they (and often I) start wanting to climb the walls after a couple of hours. Funny, we fare better the longer the power IS gone

    Just my thoughts.
    Last edited by SugarMama; 09-19-2011 at 06:13 PM.
    To return evil for good is devilish; to return good for good is human; to return good for evil is Divine - Alistair Begg

  10. #50
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Aging - As the Violin, the Wine, & the Silver - We Get Better

    A friend's child recently left for college--she texts, tweets, e-mails, phones her parents etc. And they do the same. But her mother still got a text saying that said child was going to go check her mail and wanted to know if there'd be anything there.

    Despite all the faster, more modern forms of communication, she and her friends apparently still get excited about finding something in their mail boxes other than random notices from the college. They really do want letters and cards, even if they are old-fashioned and slow. And care packages, of course--you just can't get cookies through a text.

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