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Thread: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

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    MRD
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3758863;
    While I admit to occasionally using the word "freaking" whilst typing while enraged (got to keep those moderators in mind even in the middle of a fit of rage ), in general I loathe euphemisms for swearing. If you're going to swear, then swear. If you have some moral opposition to swearing, then the use of "gosh", "darn", and "fudge" is just hypocritical. Words are what we make them, and the sentiment behind the euphemisms is exactly that behind the original expletives.
    OH thank you!!!! My sister says "oh fudge" and gets very indignant when I say to her that it's the same as saying what she really means and everyone knows what she REALLY means, but she has never "sworn" in her life. Horse hockey. She does all the time. Besides, it's scientifically proven that swearing lowers your blood pressure and is a pain reliever. Ever stub your toe on the coffee table? And curse? what happens? The pain goes away after about the 5th or 6th curse word. And yelling one in traffic? Instant stress reliever.

    Fierce: my dad was a sailor too and that's where I learned to swear, but he rarely used the F word. Now me, I'm like you, depends on the place and people, but I can have a foul mouth or be the sweet blooming flower of Southern womanhood where such words would not fall from my honeyed lips. I worked where I'm currently working now for almost a year and was being especially cautious of my language when one day the f bomb slipped out and my coworkers laughed themselves silly. They had been minding THEIR language because they thought I didn't cuss and was sensative to it. We all had a good laugh and now we are a lot more open, but still watch our words, as we are at work.
    Last edited by MRD; 11-29-2009 at 07:46 AM.
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    Wait, what? ArchieComic Fan's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    [QUOTE=Columbia, MD;3758947;]
    Quote Originally Posted by ArchieComic Fan;3758943;
    I don't have a problem saying or hearing "no problem" or "not a problem." I like knowing my request is not a problem. And I like letting others know their request is not a problem. So...I don't see the problem.


    Re: "no problem" -- it is mis-used when "you're welcome" would be a more appropriate response. When one says "thank you" "no problem" is not the correct response. It just sounds off-hand to me. Just my humble opinion.
    I think it has a lot to do with the area a person is from and how often certain buzz words are used in those regions (or in one's circle of family and friends). You grow up hearing things and you say them because it's what you know. Of course that's no excuse for not learning good manners or speaking properly in social situations once we are old enough to know better.

    I just think there are some things that although we might cringe hearing them or prefer another way of saying things, it's not really that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things. If someone is being polite while uttering the offending word or phrase, we should cut them some slack. It doesn't necessarily mean they are being insincere. I think a lot of it's in the delivery, not just what's being said. Someone can have all the right etiquette and come across as snotty and condescending. I'd rather hear "no problem" with a smile and good attitude then "you're welcome" in an automatic, non-friendly tone. For me, it's the overall experience that matters.

    And not directed at you Columbia, but one thing that I don't like about today's politically correct society is having to pre-think everything we say or do because we might offend someone. I do try to use good judgment and common sense when I speak or write. But I'm not going to censor everything I say. Not going to happen. Yes, there is a time and place for things, but we have to sometimes live and let live. At the end of the day, I am who I am .
    Last edited by ArchieComic Fan; 11-29-2009 at 07:54 AM.
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Archie, explained like that it makes a lot of sense. But I'm still not going to take "my bad" for "I'm sorry", I don't care how they say it.
    At least no problem makes sense. My bad does not. Your bad what? Manners? Is what I always want to say.
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    I was talking to my husband about this thread last night in bed, and he brought up a really good one.
    XTREME!!!! He even has XTREME DEODERANT!! For when he wants to extremely not stink?
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    Wait, what? ArchieComic Fan's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;3758953;
    Archie, explained like that it makes a lot of sense. But I'm still not going to take "my bad" for "I'm sorry", I don't care how they say it.
    At least no problem makes sense. My bad does not. Your bad what? Manners? Is what I always want to say.
    I'm with you on that one!

    I was so happy when "Y2K" went away. And I hate the whole "Gen-X, Y" stereotyping. I suppose there has to be some way to identify certain age groups but for some reason those bother me.

    I just looked up some of the latest overused buzz words and agree with "gone viral" (as in video). News outlets are using that one a lot. When I see that, my first thought is about disease or an internet virus.

    "Golden Parachute" seems to be overused a lot too and I hate it because it just reminds me of how we got into this economical mess to begin with.
    Last edited by ArchieComic Fan; 11-29-2009 at 08:36 AM.
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Just thought of another one thats been done to death in my neck of the woods--'sweet'. Its used to describe everything or just dropped off at the end of a sentence for good measure.

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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by ArchieComic Fan;3758952;
    Someone can have all the right etiquette and come across as snotty and condescending. I'd rather hear "no problem" with a smile and good attitude then "you're welcome" in an automatic, non-friendly tone. For me, it's the overall experience that matters.
    I feel the same way, but then, I do use "no problem", or even worse "np" in Sametime (office...chatline, I guess you'd call it), for the casual thanks offered for simple tasks performed for someone else. I use "your welcome" for a more formal thank you, or a thank you offered for something of deeper meaning. If someone offers me a "thanks, you rock", a "thanks, you're the best", or even a "thx", "np" seems an appropriately casual response.

    And I agree that correct etiquette can occasionally come across as stiff and unapproachable, as can (I have found) the use of proper language and grammar. You stick "whom" in the middle of a sentence, you're going to get the stinkeye from some people.
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Today is Sunday and that reminded me of another one. When someone is making a comparison using "than," and he adds "what" right after, it makes me crazy. For example: "This recipe made more mashed potatoes than what I was expecting." You don't need the what!!

    Troy Aikman is a frequent offender of this.

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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    The misuse of pronouns, which is running rampant everywhere you turn. Online, print, television, and non-media everyday interactions (writing and speech)...

    Examples: "Her and I are perfect for each other" (ACK!), "Me and my boyfriend went out to dinner", "It affected she and I" (double ACK!), etc., etc., etc. For some reason, it seems to be at epidemic level with the Bachelor and Bachelorette cast members.

    I heard a really "good" one on TV last night from a major network "investigative reporter". The word "myself" was misused, but I guess my subconscious protected me from remembering it.

    Also aggravating is the misuse of apostrophes (in writing, obviously) and singular vs. plural words.
    The Bachelor/Bachelorette series is a soap opera with unskilled actors, bad writing, and beautiful locations...it even edits the real moon!

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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3758969;
    I feel the same way, but then, I do use "no problem", or even worse "np" in Sametime (office...chatline, I guess you'd call it), for the casual thanks offered for simple tasks performed for someone else. I use "your welcome" for a more formal thank you, or a thank you offered for something of deeper meaning. If someone offers me a "thanks, you rock", a "thanks, you're the best", or even a "thx", "np" seems an appropriately casual response.

    And I agree that correct etiquette can occasionally come across as stiff and unapproachable, as can (I have found) the use of proper language and grammar. You stick "whom" in the middle of a sentence, you're going to get the stinkeye from some people.


    There is always a time and place to use certain words and phrases, but apparantly those lines are getting blurred.

    I am Southern (No you say! ) and depending upon whom I'm speaking with, I can lapse into "ain't" at the drop of a hat and start droppin' all the "g"s off words.
    But at work or in a formal setting, I can and do speak correctly most times.
    And where I work is more of a formal setting, than a casual office.

    But I do think that those with whom you are most comfortable, you will lapse into a more casual vernacular than you would or should in some social or work settings.

    And when I have to write papers for school, I am exceedingly correct, but you should hear the profs complain about the language and usage that some of these college students use. I think that my grades have been elevated by one prof in particular as I haven't really put a lot of effort into the papers I've turned in for him, but compared to what he's getting from the rest of the class, I apparantly write like Shakespeare. So in comparison, I've gotten much higher grades than I think I deserve. But I'm not going to complain. The classes I consider "important" are getting much better work out of me.

    But from what I see and hear around a college campus, I really do have to wonder just what is being taught in high school these days.

    cause it sure ain't good talk.


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