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Thread: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

  1. #31
    FORT Fogey Ellen's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    I like "and/or." It's very useful for memos.
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  2. #32
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    While I admit to occasionally using the word "freaking" whilst typing while enraged (got to keep those moderators in mind even in the middle of a fit of rage ), in general I loathe euphemisms for swearing. If you're going to swear, then swear. If you have some moral opposition to swearing, then the use of "gosh", "darn", and "fudge" is just hypocritical. Words are what we make them, and the sentiment behind the euphemisms is exactly that behind the original expletives.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  3. #33
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    I'm a "G".
    I'm the "OG".
    Or anything gangsta-related.
    (I live with teenagers.)

  4. #34
    Living Vicariously via RT Fierce Critter's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3758863;
    While I admit to occasionally using the word "freaking" whilst typing while enraged (got to keep those moderators in mind even in the middle of a fit of rage ), in general I loathe euphemisms for swearing. If you're going to swear, then swear. If you have some moral opposition to swearing, then the use of "gosh", "darn", and "fudge" is just hypocritical. Words are what we make them, and the sentiment behind the euphemisms is exactly that behind the original expletives.
    I'm the daughter of a sailor and while he rarely swears, I have an absolutely foul mouth - when nobody is around except my husband or good friends.

    My husband surprised me by laughing in the car yesterday when I said something and threw the "F" word in there like 2nd nature. 11 years of marriage and I can still throw him for a loop.

    I make it a point to clean up my act around mixed company. I use "freaking" generally, I admit. I don't like it, but I prefer to cater my language to my company.

    I had a very religious friend in high school. I never swore around her. But one day when getting off the bus, a neighborhood bully challenged me to a fight by pushing me off the bus. It took me so off-guard that I stood up, fists raised, and proceeded to use every foul word under the sun - right in front of my friend.

    I apologized after, but it didn't really bother her.

    Anyway, I do tend to gear my language to my company. I did a paper on it in speech in college. Speak Queen's English in some places and you'll get your ass kicked. While gutter-speak is best kept out of conversations with people with whom you are not well acquainted.

    Ahh, I love language.

  5. #35
    A Meat Loaf Aday... ClosetNerd's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3758863;
    While I admit to occasionally using the word "freaking" whilst typing while enraged (got to keep those moderators in mind even in the middle of a fit of rage ), in general I loathe euphemisms for swearing. If you're going to swear, then swear. If you have some moral opposition to swearing, then the use of "gosh", "darn", and "fudge" is just hypocritical. Words are what we make them, and the sentiment behind the euphemisms is exactly that behind the original expletives.
    I don't have a moral opposition to swearing, but "Gosh" and "Darn" (or sometimes Dangit) are explitives that I use commonly. They just come out naturally with no premeditation. Is that the same as what you consider being hypocritical, or can you just tell when someone is forcibly censoring themselves and it's the tone of the words that make them so distasteful? I would never use "Gosh darnit" That just sounds to fake and weird, but I do regularly use "Geez Louise!"

    Oh yeah, I forgot to say can we also please stop calling things 2.0
    As in (whatever/whoever 2.0) UG THAT IS SO ANNOYING! And it sounds so dated.
    ~There is no way to Happiness. Happiness is the way.~

  6. #36
    Over and Out! Bunny555's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by ClosetNerd;3758800;
    Va-Jay-Jay. Can we please strike that from the world. PLEASE?
    Every time my mother says it I cringe.
    Oh No! Your mother says that?

  7. #37
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    [QUOTE=Ellen;3758717........

    One of my European clients once asked me about going to "the O.C." (train vs. rental car, etc.). I couldn't understand what he was asking for, and then he explained: "You know, Laguna Beach, Newport Beach?" Apparently he was a fan of the TV show. I had to explain to him that NO ONE here calls Orange County "the O.C." LA, yes. PB, OB, IB -- yes. MB, no. SD, no.[/QUOTE]


    Where I live, OC stands for Ocean City, MD, a very popular beach community.

  8. #38
    Wait, what? ArchieComic Fan's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    I don't have a problem saying or hearing "no problem" or "not a problem." I like knowing my request is not a problem. And I like letting others know their request is not a problem. So...I don't see the problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by cablejockey;3758616;
    Some that come to mind are--24/7--step up--outside the box--taking ownership--baby momma/baby daddy--it is what it is.
    But "it is what it is" comes in so handy at times and sums up certain situations perfectly! . I use it, but not to death.

    Quote Originally Posted by PGM35;3758636;
    "threw him under the bus". Used in Big Brother a lot!
    Even worse, most of the time they don't even use it correctly. They say it for any and every situation and often makes no sense.
    Last edited by ArchieComic Fan; 11-29-2009 at 07:12 AM.
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  9. #39
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    [QUOTE=ArchieComic Fan;3758943;]I don't have a problem saying or hearing "no problem" or "not a problem." I like knowing my request is not a problem. And I like letting others know their request is not a problem. So...I don't see the problem.


    Re: "no problem" -- it is mis-used when "you're welcome" would be a more appropriate response. When one says "thank you" "no problem" is not the correct response. It just sounds off-hand to me. Just my humble opinion.

  10. #40
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Re: Buzz Words You're Tired of Hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by Luv2Lurk;3758763;
    I am so tired of hearing the word, "beyotch." (not sure how it is spelled)


    Quote Originally Posted by ClosetNerd;3758800;
    Va-Jay-Jay. Can we please strike that from the world. PLEASE?
    Every time my mother says it I cringe.

    I was about to post both of these, more especially the second, which I hate hearing.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

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