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Thread: Regional Dialects/Odd Sayings

  1. #81
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Here's one I do, and people from different regions make fun of me for it. I say "might should" or "might could". It seems to mean "perhaps." Like, "We might could go to this one bar, if that one's closed." Or, "You might should just call him if you're worried about it." Does anyone else do this? Or am I just a freak?
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  2. #82
    Up Where They Belong SurvivorGirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John
    In Ireland: "JAYsus."


    Reminds me of a deacon at the church I go to.

  3. #83
    should be studying...... ravs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozjod
    In Australia it's also "take-away" and "chemists".

    Some other differences between the US and Australia that I can think of off the top of my head.

    Thongs, we wear ours on our feet. I'm not sure what you call them, flip flops?
    Root, in the US you root for a team, in Australia that's what Betty and Bob do in private
    Our car's don't have trunks, they have boots and they don't have hoods, they have bonnets.
    Our generic term for pop/soda is "soft drink".
    You cook with bell peppers, we call them Capsicums.
    In a city, you have a downtown, we have a CBD (central business district)
    You have egg rolls, we have spring rolls.
    You have cotton candy, we have fairy floss.
    You have papaya, we have paw paw.

    that's all I can think off at the moment, I know there are heaps more
    Woo Hoo! - Finally another aussie around here.

    Here's some more...

    You have cookies, we have biscuits.
    You have diapers, we have nappies.
    You have strollers, we have prams.
    You have cell phones, we have mobiles.
    You have thongs (underwear), we have G-strings.
    You have fanny-packs, we have bum-bags.
    You say "she's all that!" like on Ricki Lake, we say "she's up herself"
    You have line edgers or grass edgers, we have whipper snippers.
    You have candy, we have lollies.
    You have quilts, we have doonas
    You have young'n (small child), we have ankle biters.
    Last edited by ravs; 04-24-2004 at 11:42 PM.
    I rather lurk than post.

  4. #84
    Im just not that into you AmandaFabulous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravs
    Woo Hoo! - Finally another aussie around here.

    Here's some more...
    You have thongs (underwear), we have G-strings.
    Actually...we call them both - they are 2 different things. This is a g-string

    and this is a thong

    Difference is a g-string has a string back, a thong has a "T" shaped back or a little triangle of fabric at the top.

    Another difference..g strings hurt...thongs you don't feel.
    Look, I love me most...If I could run across the beach into my own arms, I would.

  5. #85
    *** Bill747's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AIWANNABE
    Canada has some very strange ones. They call sneakers, runners.
    Correction. We call them "running shoes", not runners. Runners means something else, usually long narrow carpets placed in hallways.

    I lived/lives in Vancouver/Toronto; my sister in New York/Seattle. So I've noticed a lot of differences. The alphabet "z" is pronounced "e-saad" in Canada, but in the States it's similiar to "c", or "zee".

    Many Canadian terms are being displaced by American terms, e.g. chesterfield by sofa, serviette by napkins. But some new Cdn terms have developed recently. E.g. "a loonie" = a dollar coin = 4 quartres. In the 1980's, when the Cdn gov't introduced dollar coins to replace the dollar bills, people began calling it a "loonie" because:
    (1) it was a looney idea.
    (2) the face of it has a Canadian loon.
    (3) while Prime Minister Mulroney (or Mulooney) was in charged, the Cdn dollar droped in value from $1 US to 75 cents US.
    "The greatest myth in the world is that beauty equals goodness." Leo Tolstoy

  6. #86
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy
    Here's one I do, and people from different regions make fun of me for it. I say "might should" or "might could". It seems to mean "perhaps." Like, "We might could go to this one bar, if that one's closed." Or, "You might should just call him if you're worried about it." Does anyone else do this? Or am I just a freak?
    Bless your heart, Lucy you know that's a Southernism. You could always say "ort to" , thats another one. Here's some more with explanations where needed; I wrote these all down as I heard them, just TODAY!

    Tacky - in poor taste, garish, outdated or otherwise inappropriate (and not a good definition here, but all the Southern ladies know what this means)
    Purty - pretty
    Spring lizard - salamander
    Branch - creek
    Stumped (not stubbed) a toe
    Washing powders - laundry detergent
    Booger man - fictitious evil creature that will "get" you
    Growed up - overgrown with vegetation , as a trail that is not used much
    Idjit - idiot
    Haint - ghost ( also, 'ain't. I swear this is true; one of my old great-aunts used to say of a neighbor she disliked "She's so ignernt [ignorant] she says haint instead of ain't")
    Dadgummit or dadgum - dammit or damn
    Bream - bluegill and various other sunfish
    Snake doctor - damselfly (like a dragonfly but smaller and thinner
    Plum - absolutely (You're plum crazy, smoking while you pump gas!)

    Grin like a horse eating briars
    Grin like a possum eating s**t
    Sorry the day away
    Run like a scalded dog
    He could eat a watermelon through a chain link fence - he's buck toothed

    And yes, I say " fixing to" and the "Coke" thing; I had no idea this bothered people so badly, but I was born in rural Georgia and have lived here all my life. So I don't even notice when I hear these things, and I have no intention of trying to stop saying them, even though I know it's incorrect.

    By the way, John, my sister and I visited your part of the country (sort of) last year - road trip in Wisconsin and the U.P. We did OK in Milwaukee, but when we got to the North Woods area and the U.P. we almost needed an interpreter for both sides!
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  7. #87
    An innocent bystander nlmcp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    By the way, John, my sister and I visited your part of the country (sort of) last year - road trip in Wisconsin and the U.P. We did OK in Milwaukee, but when we got to the North Woods area and the U.P. we almost needed an interpreter for both sides!
    LOL queenb, I'm from the UP. I can see why you would need help there.

    Yoopers -people living in or usually from the UP (as most of us leave there)
    yeh eh...universal greeting
    youse- you or you people maybe pural may not

    Words like Don and dawn, cot and caught sound alike.

    pasty is a food. A very good food.

    There's more but I'm not awake enough
    I could go east, I could go west, it was all up to me to decide. Just then I saw a young hawk flyin' and my soul began to rise. ~Bob Seger

  8. #88
    should be studying...... ravs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaFabulous
    Actually...we call them both - they are 2 different things.
    Difference is a g-string has a string back, a thong has a "T" shaped back or a little triangle of fabric at the top.

    Another difference..g strings hurt...thongs you don't feel.
    Wouldn't know what a g-string or thong would feel, but thanks for clarifying. In Oz, the t-shaped and string back are all called G-strings. I haven't heard a different name for each.

    A friend once told me how an American friend she just met looked at her really funny when she told him that she wore thongs all the time in the summer. Of course, she was referring to what you american's call 'flip flops'.

    Another incident involved another friend of mine when she was travelling in a bus and an american tourist said loudly on how her fanny hurt from the seat. The other people on the bus just laughed and my friend had to go to the tourist and explain what fanny meant in Oz . Lets just say, the tourist was a bit embarassed.
    Last edited by ravs; 04-25-2004 at 07:19 AM.
    I rather lurk than post.

  9. #89
    REALITY BITES Wisconsinswede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaFabulous
    Speaking of salesmen with an accent - Troy the apprentice - I was shocked when I found out he was from Idaho. I would have bet that he was from Georgia just by listening to him talk.

    PS - forever I read your screen name as Wisconsin WEED - I only got it like a week ago.

    Ya Troy definitely did it for me as well! I'd buy a bridge from him.

    Weed???? WTH? Bama....what did you think about me all this time?
    giggle....the trip to Sweden story didnt even send off any tiny bells or whistles


  10. #90
    REALITY BITES Wisconsinswede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nlmcp
    pasty is a food. A very good food.

    ugh I used to hate when my mother made this....who said a "meat filled pie" was ok to feed people

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