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Thread: Regional Dialects/Odd Sayings

  1. #531
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    I don't know about the age/region thing either, but in rural/suburban Georgia we always said tennis shoes', and I only ever heard kids from "up North" ever call them 'sneakers". But I'm in the over 40 crowd too so who knows.

    About the soft drink thing, I forgot one very brand specific regional term, but got reminded of it at Fortcon--Unk looked over and said "that takes me back home"--I had just mentioned something about a "Co-Cola" !
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  2. #532
    giz
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    Okay I've got one. Why do some people say pussy-cat and some say kitty-cat. I think puss is more English and people from a non-British background are more likely to say kitty. (People in England nowadays say moggy for cat, but I mean traditionally). And I'm talking feline here, so keep it clean!

  3. #533
    Back from the dead! brusch's Avatar
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    Reading about rubbernecking in the "Pet Peeves" thread reminded me of a Chicago term for it that I don't think is used much anywhere else. Instead of rubbernecking or gawking at an accident, it's a gapers block or gapers delay.
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  4. #534
    NI FORT fan Belfastgirl's Avatar
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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/voices/

    Check out this site if you're interested in different sayings and accents, it's amazing how in Britain we all speak the same language, but all sound so different!
    My accent isn't there, nearest is probably Belfast, Sandy Row, though not as broad, "posher!" i suppose.
    Act your age, not your shoe size!

  5. #535
    FORT Fogey cablejockey's Avatar
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    That was fascinating, I love to hear accents. 'Experts' have been saying that eventually we will all sound the same, and a lot of accents will die out. I hope that does'nt happen.

  6. #536
    RESIDENT JEDI MASTER Stargazer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    I don't know about the age/region thing either, but in rural/suburban Georgia we always said tennis shoes', and I only ever heard kids from "up North" ever call them 'sneakers". But I'm in the over 40 crowd too so who knows.

    About the soft drink thing, I forgot one very brand specific regional term, but got reminded of it at Fortcon--Unk looked over and said "that takes me back home"--I had just mentioned something about a "Co-Cola" !
    I think its more regional than generational. I'm under 35 and have always called them "tennis shoes". I also call all soft drinks, "pop".
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  7. #537
    giz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belfastgirl
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/voices/

    Check out this site if you're interested in different sayings and accents, it's amazing how in Britain we all speak the same language, but all sound so different!
    My accent isn't there, nearest is probably Belfast, Sandy Row, though not as broad, "posher!" i suppose.
    thanks for that Bg, I'm going to listen to that later. I love hearing different accents. When I first moved to England (from Canada) I couldn't tell Irish and Northern Irish apart (lots of friends I met there had emmigrated from both places). Now I think, what was going on with that? And there was a time when I couldn't understand Corrie Street. My ear is much better trained now. One of the dads at our school is a Derry man, I love listening to his accent. (Shouldn't be too hard on myself, as most of the world can't tell the difference between our - Canadian - accents and Americans).

  8. #538
    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
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    My grandmother is in the hospital and the doctor sat her up yesterday for the first time in a couple days. She told my mom that it made her "drunk as a piss ant". I've never heard that one before. Have any of you?
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    FORT Fogey PGM35's Avatar
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    My future Mom In Law had a saying that I had never heard of before - If you don't quit it, I'm going to kick you in the slats.

    Have no idea what that means.

  10. #540
    Premium Member canuckinchile's Avatar
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    Pissant is all one word, and I haven't heard it in years...according to dictionary.com it means "insignificant one" but I have heard it used to describe someone that is behaving badly such as "Stop being such a little pissant..."

    Kick in the slats is a kick in the rear end.

    Man am I old.

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