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Thread: Regional Dialects/Odd Sayings

  1. #41
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    Originally posted by phat32
    The one thing they all had in common was their lack of humor (ie didn't laugh at my jokes
    If that was the case phat, then I'm amazed you've ever had any luck with women period.

    I know someday you'll have a beautiful life, I know you'll be a star in somebody else's eyes... but why... why... why can't it be me?

  2. #42
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    I went to school in the UK for a while and the differences in words amazed me. Someone, somewhere once said that America and England are "two countries, divided by a single language," and they were so right!

    Words I remember from there are:
    ladder = run in your stockings
    jumper = sweater
    nappie = diaper
    serviette = napkin
    cleaner = maid
    martini = vermouth
    roundabout = traffic circle
    lorry = truck
    ploughman's = bread, cheese and a pint
    pint = glass of beer
    nick = steal
    fancy = like

    I picked up a little bit of an accent while there, and to this day I pronounce mascara (mas-care-ah) as mas-car-ah.

  3. #43
    get it off! StevieM's Avatar
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    Amna,
    I wrote about meeting a guy on-line (while back) he was from Blackpool England.
    We spoke for over a year before he came here (Massachusetts)
    to meet me and my friends & family. So, I understood him fine. My friends and family - I had to be a translater for the 3 weeks he was here.
    They couldn't understand half the stuff he said.
    I loved his accent! It wasn't as strong as the guys from say the movie "The Full Monty" but, they couldn't understand everything he said.
    I can't remember all the different terms and words that were different but, there were so many.
    And he said I was the one with the strong accent .. : )
    So, where's the Cannes Film Festival being held this year?
    ~ Christina Aguilera

  4. #44
    Leo
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    Originally posted by StevieM
    And he said I was the one with the strong accent .. : )
    To any good English speaker, it's always the rest of the world that has a strong accent.

  5. #45
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Eden,

    All right, luv? Lurvly to run into someone else from Blighty, eh?

    I am also endlessly fascinated by the differences in American English and The Queen's English.

    Some of my favorites:

    tea = the beverage, but also an early dinner
    lift = elevator
    tobaconnist = the convenience store
    Wellies = Wellington-brand heavy-duty boots
    "Cheers!" = a toast, but also colloquial for "Thanks!"
    to ring = to telephone someone
    to call = to show up on someone's doorstep
    solicitor = attorney
    rubbish = trash/garbage
    garden = yard
    aubergine = eggplant (also the color)
    aerial = antennae
    boot (ref. to autos) = trunk
    bonnet (ref. to autos) = hood
    crisps = potato chips
    "chips" = French fries (That's right--not FREEDOM, but FRENCH, fries.)

    Amna could probably help us with more here, but then again, how is she to know when anything is called something different across the Atlantic?

    I, too, picked up on a few English expressions that I use to this day: "Cheers!" for "Thanks!" and use of "wanker" around my friends who were in England with me, when we want to curse someone on the down-low in the States.

    Oh, and the Canadians also use "serviette" and many other Queen's English expressions. For some reason, it drives me up the wall when they do. (Sorry, Canadians.)

    [Me in restaurant, other patron comes in.]

    Other patron (to counterman): May I have a serviette?

    Me: [squeezes a bottle of ketchup until it explodes]

    P.S. To our Canadian Friends: Lest I be flamed to a crisp, I once lived and worked in Canada, and I like your country and love its people.
    Last edited by phat32; 03-30-2003 at 11:13 AM.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  6. #46
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Originally posted by hazyshadeof
    If that was the case phat, then I'm amazed you've ever had any luck with women period.

    But...but...

    Bah! A pox on your house!
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  7. #47
    get it off! StevieM's Avatar
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    hehheh
    Ok
    the one that cracks me up the most is SHAG
    I'd really never heard it til about 6 years ago.
    that one kills me.
    (thinking Austin Powers will forever be affiliated with that term)
    So, where's the Cannes Film Festival being held this year?
    ~ Christina Aguilera

  8. #48
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    Originally posted by StevieM
    hehheh
    Ok
    the one that cracks me up the most is SHAG
    I'd really never heard it til about 6 years ago.
    that one kills me.
    (thinking Austin Powers will forever be affiliated with that term)
    And don't forget SNOG (french kiss).

  9. #49

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    I was born in the US, but my family is from England & Ireland. Needless to say, I grew up talking waaaaaay funny and couldn't understand why until my first trip to the U.K. Plus, my kids call me "mum" or mumsie", which is unusual in CA.

    Living in California - the usual slang words are "dude" & "yo".

    One of my favorite experiences was explaining "Austin Powers and the spy who shagged me" to my teenage son. And, why he shouldn't use the term "patting someone on the fanny".
    Why doesn't it make sense? Because we're on the wrong side of the tapestry...

  10. #50
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    Originally posted by firegirl
    so is the term " do what?" when you want someone to repeat something or you weren't sure you heard them right, for example:
    I didn't think the term "Do what?" was a southern term. I thought everybody used it. I actually say "Do what now?"

    I also use: ya'll, coke, fixin
    and I've heard many Texas use the word "yonder" which means Over there I think.

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