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Thread: Regional Dialects/Odd Sayings

  1. #11
    The new me! Feifer's Avatar
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    In Texas "that dog don't/won't hunt" means that something is broke/broken. When it is repaired they say "that dog'll hunt". I do not hear this very often, but it has been sprinkled throughout my life.
    It occurred to me that no matter how bleak things might seem at times, at least I have a head. ----Stargazer

  2. #12
    everyone's a critic... holly71's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Eden
    Ohioans also end sentences with unnecessary words. "Where's my purse at?"
    My mom calls her purse her "pocketbook" & she calls the grocery store the "supermarket" She's from NJ. Well, so am I technically, but I mean she lived most of her life in NJ.
    Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

  3. #13
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Originally posted by nlmcp
    In the Upper Pennesula of MI, the term "Yea hey" means Hello. I don't have an accent until I go home and some one says to me "Yea hey Nance, holy waa, ya have a long trip hey" Which someone always says to me.

    Here it's pop not soda. Can't think of anything else but I'm sure I will.
    1. Wow, that's wild. I hear the folks from Fargo when you write it out like that.

    2. The eternal "pop" versus "soda" versus "Coke" debate. There's actually a Web site devoted to this somewhere. I need to dig it up and post it on this thread.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  4. #14
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    The UP is more Sconnie than Michigander, so the talk is a little more scandinavian. Plus, you can throw a little Canuck into that dialect, and see what you get.

    In the UP, having a flashing yellow light at the intersection your gas station's on makes you a metropolis.

  5. #15
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Originally posted by hazyshadeof
    I love in the South how everyone is always "fixin'"

    [snip]when I was still talkin my fake Southern accent that I had picked up in my 5 years down there

    Also in the South everything is Coke. Someone can ask you what you want to drink, and if you say Coke, they will ask you what kind.

    And yes, it's true... in the Great Midwest, they do say "You betcha"
    1. I tend to pick up accents where I live, too. (And why shouldn't people do that? Otherwise, you'll have a kid with an English accent living with his Oklahoma-accented parents.)

    It's getting confusing, though. Some mornings, I wake up, and I say, "Where am I? And what's the word for 'hungry and want some food?'"

    2. The g/f's friends actually had to school me on a few key phrases so that I could survive. "Coke" for everything was one of them.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  6. #16
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    Here's an interesting page, with links to most states' dialects and regional coloquialisms.

    http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialLnx.html

  7. #17
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Originally posted by John
    How about the eternal "in line" versus "on line" debate?

    We say "in line" here. I was standing in line...

    I know New Yawkers say "on line", and I just don't get it. you're not standing on a line, you're standing IN a line.
    I have a theory that depending on how a geographical area was settled, they may hold on to Queen's English expressions a little longer. Or they may have the Queen's English expression where it doesn't exist anywhere else in the country.

    I noticed "on line" when I lived in England. Interestingly, it's "queue" in England, as many of you probably knew, but when I've met English folks here, and they try to adapt to "line", they invariably say "on line."

    P.S. Alabama was settled by many English and Irish folks, and from time to time, I'll snap my head when I hear an expression that I am positive originated back in the UK and could not be found outside this area. I'll have to listen and note some for this thread.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  8. #18
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Eden and Feifer take the prize so far for the most interesting expressions. "...how the cow eats cabbage" and "That dog won't hunt."

    John,

    I was LOL at your description of what makes an MI metropolis. I'm clicking on your link now.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  9. #19
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    From the Michigan Guide:

    "Big BEEverr" (PARENTS: hide your children, for I now digress into PG13-rated content): pronouncing this major thoroughfare through the city of Troy almost always draws snickers from out-of-towners. However, it was originally named in the 1800's after a nearby beaver pond, long since paved over. Sadly enough, that fact that it is Exit 69 on I-75, and crosses Mound Road, perpetuates its urban legend factor. (What Kentuckians don't want you to know is that there are two villages in Northern KY: Beaver Lick and Big Bone Lick. I am not kidding... see fer yerself.)

    "The Big Lake": With 11,000 inland lakes, you can't drive in a straight line in Michigan for long without hitting some body of water. So whichever Great Lake you're near becomes "the Big Lake".

    "The Bridge": Everywhere except for the towns of Port Huron or Detroit, "The Bridge" refers to The "Mackinaw" Bridge.

    "A Cole One": a beer. Or several.

    "The Cottage": Many folks in Michigan have a place they go to Up North that they call The Cottage. Sometimes it's a slowly disintegrating cabin in the middle of frickin' B.F.E., where you go to get drunk and THEN shoot at deer. Other times, it's a Lake Michigan beach house that sleeps 22 and has its own marina. Ya jes never know.

    "Fudgies": Tourists. Visitors to Michigan's Mackinac Island spend a lot of time in the gourmet fudge shops there, earning the local nickname "fudgies", which has spread to other tourist areas as well. California equivalent: "Lookieloos", who will approach you at an after party, stand about a foot from your face, frown at you when they realize you're not Tom Cruise or Nicole Kidman, and then walk away without a word.

    "Geez-o-pete!": Related: "Geez-Louise!" A Michigan expletive for polite company, having something to do with Jesus and St. Peter. The funny thing about this one is that in Cincinnati, they say "GEE-zle." In Ireland: "JAYsus."

    "Glovebox": US equivalent: glove compartment. Do you suppose that, at one time, people actually kept gloves in it, instead of napkins, Altoids, tire pressure checkers and a Glock Nine?

    "A Good One": a good day. Proper Michigan etiquette is to say "have a good one!" to the checkout clerk when leaving the party store. Caz we're all, ya know, frien'ly and stuff.

    "Hourlies": hourly factory workers, usually automotive.

    "How'zit goin'?" In other parts of the world, the equivalent of "what's up?" or "how are you?"

    "Ink Pen": It's not a ballpoint, not just "a pen"...why do we do this? No clue. (thanks to Joe for another one)

    "The Joe": Our energy-saving name for Detroit's Joe Louis Arena (thanks to DJ Clutch)

    "Kripes Almighty!" This one sent in by John Z, as another unique Michiganism similar to "Geezopete!"

    "LOOKit!" Sometimes, we, uhh, have a tendency to end sentences with a preposition, like.

    "Mackinac": this French/Indian word confuses nearly everyone, even natives. If you're talking about the city on the south side of the Straits of Mackinac, it's pronounced "Mackinaww City". If you're talking about the island, it's pronounced "Mackinaw". If you're talking about the Straits, they're pronounced "Straits of Macinack". If you're talking about the Mackinac Bridge, it's "Mackinaw Bridge". If you're talking about the fort on the south side of the straits, it's pronounced "Michillimackinack". Got it? Never mind.

    "Michigan Left": A right turn onto a boulevard followed by an immediate u-turn at the next available crossover. This keeps traffic from backing up at intersections with boulevards... only other place I've seen this is in Maryland.

    "Parking Deck": Alternate form: "parking ramp". Known elsewhere as a parking garage.

    "Parrty Storre": US equivalent: liquor store. There's one on every other block. We like it that way, cuz ya never know when the urge fer a Moosehead'll hitcha. Or, ya know... could be Stroh's.

    "Pastie": a meat-filled pastry dish, pronounced passtee, brought to the Upper Peninsula mining country by Welsh and Cornish miners in the 1800's. Most Trolls (see below) and Fudgies erroneously pronounce it paystee, which brings a whole new meaning to being hungry for a pastie. (don't go there) (this one sent in by Stacey)

    "The Plant": any factory (again, usually automotive).

    "The Ren Cen": Detroit's Renaissance Center, which 1) hasn't ever been called by its full name, ever, and 2) didn't spark the "renaissance" that Detroiters had hoped for, and 3) wouldn't fit in as a place to hold a Renaissance Festival. GM finally bought it, likely hoping for their own kind of renaissance, which is just plain tough when you share shoreline with attractions such as Zug Island.

    "SecretariahState": US equivalent: Department of Motor Vehicles. I've always wanted to register for that personalized plate on the wall of every Secretary of State's office that says "SAMPLE". Hmm... or, ya know, like "VOID" er "XPIRED" er somethin'. As the kids in B'ham might say, that would be "suhweeeeeet!"

    "The Soo": Refers to the small Upper Peninsula town Sault Sainte Marie that weathermen across the nation love to refer to. Pronounced "soo saint marie".

    "The Thumb": the thumb-shaped area of the Lower Peninsula "mitten". (another one sent in by Stacey)

    "Trolls": people from the Lower Peninsula, who, in the minds of Yoopers, live "under the bridge." (still another from that Stacey) I personally resent that label and think we should charge some sort of toll or something to all the Yoopers coming down from... uhh... err... never mind.

    "Townies": a derogatory name for residents of small Northern Michigan tourist towns, made by snot-nosed kids from Chicago or Detroit who spend their summers there (think Charlevoix, Petoskey, Harbor Springs). Also commonly used in New England.

    "The U.P.": Michigan's Upper Peninsula. If you say you're goin' to The U-P, everyone knows what you're talking about. I've heard some non-natives trying to fit in leave off the word "The"... saying they "went to U.P." Are they smoking crack or what! Folks who live in the U.P. have an accent all their own that sounds very Canadian, and are called "Yoopers". Even the streets are funky, with their Finnish and Welsh roots... "make a left at Lehtonen until you cross Hakktui Avenue." Unh-hunh. Say Yah to da hand, dude...

    "Up North": common for anywhere in the state north of the middle of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, say around Alma. If yer goin' Up North, it's usually fer a vacation er fer deer huntin'.

    "The Union": In Michigan, there are a lot of labor unions, but when you mention "The Union", everyone knows you're talking about The UAW.

    "Wherebouts?": I'm not sure this is unique to Michigan, but when asking for the location of something, we often use the noun "whereabouts" as a question. "I live near Jenison." "Oh, yeah? Wherebouts?" Also popular, according to "bolth" Juanita and Kalamazoo Joe: "Goin' drinkin' tonight? Where at?"

    "The Windsor Ballet": Term used by Detroiters to say they're going to Canadian strip clubs in nearby Windsor. "Where ya'ff to, honey?" "Oh, the boss wants us to take a client out to the ballet. In, uhh, Windsor."

    "You guys": No, not "youse guys", and yes, it refers to women as well. Michiganians use it without even thinking. No true native would be caught dead saying "y'all"... that's just not right. (California Accent Pronunciation Guide equivalent: "duuuuuuuudes!")

  10. #20
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    I LMAO at most a' dese, 'cuz I use 'em.

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