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Thread: Gastric Bypass? Have you or someone you know had it?

  1. #11
    MRD
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    I sat down and wrote out my experiences. It's rather long, so if anyone wants to read it PM me and I'll send it to you.
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    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karna68;2310242;
    I think I would rather have a lap band than gastric bypass, just my 2 cents.
    I actually did a little research into laproscopic bands a couple of weeks ago because I gave very brief consideration to the idea of possibly talking to someone about the possibility of maybe doing something along these lines. Apparently some people who have had the band have had severe neurological problems, even to the point of death, because the placement of the band limits the body's ability to absorb certain vitamins and/or minerals (can't remember which specifically). Since I wasn't particularly enthusiastic about the idea anyway, I've decided to go about my much needed weight loss the old fashioned way - less food, more activity - because my health is more important to me than my girth.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;2312172;
    I actually did a little research into laproscopic bands a couple of weeks ago because I gave very brief consideration to the idea of possibly talking to someone about the possibility of maybe doing something along these lines. Apparently some people who have had the band have had severe neurological problems, even to the point of death, because the placement of the band limits the body's ability to absorb certain vitamins and/or minerals (can't remember which specifically). Since I wasn't particularly enthusiastic about the idea anyway, I've decided to go about my much needed weight loss the old fashioned way - less food, more activity - because my health is more important to me than my girth.
    Both surgeries limit the ability to absorb nutrients. That's why good, reputable doctors reccomend you take VERY good vitamins. They've even come out with a vitamin geared towards bariatric patients that is more easily digested and absorbed. I take protien and vitamin supplements every day and will do so forever. I don't mind, because now I feel SO much better with that weight off.
    The B vitamins can and do cause a lot of neurological problems if deficient in them. But this can happen to anyone, not just WLS patients.
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    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    I'm with Rattus; I gave quite a bit of thought to having surgery, but decided not to, given what I know about it.
    I've known quite a few people who have had gastric bypass, and unfortunately none who have been able to keep off all the weight they originally lost. The person I know who has done the best has 'only' gained back about half of the original loss in ten years.
    My sister had the surgery years ago, and lost from 350 down to 150 pounds, but now has to constantly struggle to stay below 225 or so, and is constantly having all kinds of problems I won't go into here.
    I think this is a very personal decision that you must make for yourself, but I would make sure that first I talked to some folks who have had it for five or more years, and not just references from the doctors either.
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    Shoveling the ocean MissThing's Avatar
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    I had a gastric bypass on October 3, 2005. I'd do it again in a heart beat. I wasn't morbidly obese at the time of my surgery - I was what is known as a light-weight. When I began my consultations, my bmi was 41, but by the time of my surgery, it was 38.

    However, I had every co-morbidity you can name - high blood pressure, high cholesteral, type 2 diabetes amongst the leaders. I haven't had to take diabetes medicine since my surgery, and that alone is enough to make me do it all over.

    My surgery was at a hospital that has a complete program for this - your consultations include a psychologist, a dietician, an MD that works with your primary care doctor, and the surgeon. You see these folks for at least six months prior to the surgery itself, and forever afterwards (should you choose). The only missing item, as far as I'm concerned, with the program is an exercise consultant of some sort. I'd highly recommend researching any facility you might consider, and only use one that has a complete approach like the one I use.

    I considered the lap-band but wanted the bypass in the end. My reasons included not wanting something implanted, not wanting to go for the adjustments, and I did want the possibility of dumping. (It turns out, I don't dump, but I did want that as a possible side-effect.) There are also other surgeries available, distal bypass has some real fans. However, no surgery is right for everyone, if surgery is right for you at all. It's a very personal decision, and only you can determine what's correct for you.

    It isn't easy, but that's not to discourage you, as I said earlier, I'd do it all over again in a heartbeat. In my case, it's definitely prolonged my life, and improved the quality of my life immeasurably. I wish you the very best as you research your options (including, of course, not doing anything surgical at all).
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissThing;2314264;
    I had a gastric bypass on October 3, 2005. I'd do it again in a heart beat. I wasn't morbidly obese at the time of my surgery - I was what is known as a light-weight. When I began my consultations, my bmi was 41, but by the time of my surgery, it was 38.

    However, I had every co-morbidity you can name - high blood pressure, high cholesteral, type 2 diabetes amongst the leaders. I haven't had to take diabetes medicine since my surgery, and that alone is enough to make me do it all over.

    My surgery was at a hospital that has a complete program for this - your consultations include a psychologist, a dietician, an MD that works with your primary care doctor, and the surgeon. You see these folks for at least six months prior to the surgery itself, and forever afterwards (should you choose). The only missing item, as far as I'm concerned, with the program is an exercise consultant of some sort. I'd highly recommend researching any facility you might consider, and only use one that has a complete approach like the one I use.

    I considered the lap-band but wanted the bypass in the end. My reasons included not wanting something implanted, not wanting to go for the adjustments, and I did want the possibility of dumping. (It turns out, I don't dump, but I did want that as a possible side-effect.) There are also other surgeries available, distal bypass has some real fans. However, no surgery is right for everyone, if surgery is right for you at all. It's a very personal decision, and only you can determine what's correct for you.

    It isn't easy, but that's not to discourage you, as I said earlier, I'd do it all over again in a heartbeat. In my case, it's definitely prolonged my life, and improved the quality of my life immeasurably. I wish you the very best as you research your options (including, of course, not doing anything surgical at all).
    I totally agree with Miss Thing. I too went to a facility and doctor that was a "complete" program. We did have an exercise specialist as well. I think having the complete package and all the followup helps. NOw that I've moved, I see my primary care dr. for all my regular bloodwork, but I can still talk to my original dr. staff on the phone. I found a support group here and online. I still can't stress the importance of therapy. I think that if you truly want to lose weight, whether by surgery or diet, that getting into counseling and consulting a nutrionist are key.

    With anything there are risks and complications, but getting the weight off prolonged my life just like Miss Thing said. Yes, some people have problems, some put back on the weight. But one thing I have heard over and over again in my support group is that if you are morbidly overweight, there are issues that HAVE to be taken care of. People have talked about how abuse, bad marriages, failed relationships, etc. have affected them and they turn to food to cope. Everyone has said that when they faced the issues and worked through them and learned other ways to handle stress and emotional problems, they were able to handle things better than to turn to food as comfort.

    If you are considering surgery, I'd talk to several doctors. I interviewed 3. See if there is a support group in your area and ask if you can attend meetings. They should say yes as my group had several people contemplating surgery attending to get information. And my support group had people that had gained weight back afterwards too. It was a good cross section of people with the various surgeries, various problems and a lot of successes too.
    This is a lifelong process. It's not a magic solution. You have to take control of your life and your weight. The surgery helps you get it off fast and that really helps you mentally, but when the weight loss slows or you reach your goal, it is up to YOU to maintain the loss. It is up to you to continue to eat correctly and monitor your weight and continue to exercise. And I know a lot of people that just don't want to do that. Yes, I "cheat". I will eat something sweet, but now I don't eat the whole box of cookies or the whole bag of candy. I have found that one cookie or 2 hersey kisses will satisfy my sweet tooth and I go back to my correct way of eating. It does take discipline and control and I think that therapy has helped me learn discipline and control and deal with the issues that made me turn to food in the first place. I have coping mechanisms that help me deal with stress or problems without running to the fridge.
    And I like how I feel and I never want to go back to where I was before, so that is very strong incentive to me right now.
    Having a GREAT support system in place for the long haul is very, very important. When I am having problems I know I can turn to my support group for help.
    And I just don't buy crap anymore. Keeping it out of the house also helps. Oh it sneaks in, but its not a permanent fixture here anymore.

    With ANYTHING there are the good, the bad, the successful, the failures. Which is why you need to really educate yourself on the whole process and get GOOD information and find a good doctor and team.

    It is a personal decision, but it can work and it can work well, but you have to be willing to help it work too.
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