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Thread: FORT Koffee Klatch

  1. #9631
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by ArchieComic Fan;3141125;
    Newf, just curious. I'm wanting to take piano lessons but don't know how easy/hard it is to learn as an adult. How many years have you been taking lessons and how many more do you think you'll need? . I know I need to learn the basics and how to read the music, but don't know that I want to spend years with a tutor.
    Short answer: I started out knowing nothing, but with three years of hard work, I've doubled my knowledge

    Long answer: When I started taking lessons three years ago (May of '05), I knew very little about music. I was familiar with the keyboard layout, a handful of chords that I picked up (who knows where ) and I could sort of read the treble clef. Reading the music came fairly easily to me, but playing with any kind of coordination between my hands was a back-breaking effort. My first teacher had the patience of a saint. She had been teaching for fifty years, and had seen it all (but hadn't heard it all; one time, probably about my third or fourth lesson, I told her that I didn't do my homework because Gustav and Bjorn (who I had mentioned the previous lesson, so she knew they were BIG) had eaten my piano Another time, I was getting frustrated and told her that if God had meant for me to play the piano, He'd have given me 88 fingers). We went through a couple of books in one of the instructional series, but she also let me plink away at some classical and operatic stuff to keep me enthused. My current teacher doesn't have me on a specific learning method, but had done a good job of selecting collections that keep me interested and learning. She's also been quite good at teaching me how to practice (to make more efficient use of my practice time, how to learn difficult passages (well, difficult for me and maybe the 4-year-old that she teaches.) I'm usually working on three pieces at any one time, but while she's on vacation, I'm supposed to be working on six. I practice fairly diligently, and it pays off. I sort of figured that I'd take lessons for five years, but that isn't based on anything. It impresses the heck out of me when someone sits down with a new piece of music and starts playing, but I doubt that I'll ever get to that point (I do pretty well with the right-hand part if it's a piece that I recognize, especially if I know the lyrics.) If I remember correctly, by the end of the first year, I could play a melody and chord accompaniment (ie, from a lead sheet) fairly well.

    Another short answer: Both of my teachers told me that adults have more trouble than kids when it comes to learning to play with both hands, but that the adult grasp the concepts better and have much better focus, so neither teacher feels that it is a big impediment to start as an adult. My oldest sister (just on the high side of sixty plans to take lessons this fall.
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  2. #9632
    Amethyst YetiSports7 - Snowboard FreeRide Champion Amy Lee's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    So i had a very creepy time last night as i was falling asleep. I saw what i thought was a spider sliding down into my coat and i started screaming. I was quite freaked out about it and recalled that it's not the first time it happens. And yes, i hate spiders.
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  3. #9633
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Rattus:; I'm so sorry you have shingles, but I'm very glad you found out that you have it! I wonder if an accupuncturist can help you with your condition. You should check it out!
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  4. #9634
    MRD
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Rattus, I'm so sorry you have shingles. I know they are very painful. Was the doctor able to help you at all? I have heard that they can give the chicken pox vaccine to adults with shingles in the hope of alleviating the time period you have them.

    Buglover, in my limited experience, any accounts we've had with my daughters and our names on them because she is a minor, we've had to also give them her SS#.

    Newf, I have never heard of a music teacher wanting to be paid that far in advance and I would imagine that families with children may have a hardship paying that.
    As for paying and the something happening, here is my experience: I broke my right arm when I was 9 and I was thrilled because it meant no more piano lessons for that year. My piano teacher produced a left hand ONLY book and not only did I have to finish out the year, but I had to play in the recital using the left hand only music. I was NOT a happy camper.
    --------------
    And speaking of not being a happy camper, we had the most horrible children yesterday at daycamp. The museum has had over 5000 students visit this past year and this is the first time that a group has been asked to leave early. They were from a daycare for underpriveleged kids and were given a scholarship to come. We had 11 kids from there and then 6 other kids who's parents signed them up. We could NOT control them AT ALL.
    We could not do any of the activities. They wouldn't listen, wouldn't be quiet, wouldn't sit down. The girls at the reception desk downstairs said they could hear me yelling for quiet from inside the classroom on the 2nd floor! It was so horrible, that both the Director of the Museum and the Director of education talked to the Education teacher and me and told us to send them home. To call the person in charge of their daycare and say they had to leave. I had one kid run up a nd jump on me and lock his legs around my knees and throw his arms around my waist. It was sheer luck that I didn't go over backwards. I removed his arms from my waist and told him DO NOT EVER TOUCH ME AGAIN!!!! They fought with each other. They tore up the projects we had layed out. It was like wild animals. I can't even begin to describe how horribly behaved they were and how little control we had over them. And we usually have no problem with a child or children that are badly behaved after correcting them once or twice. There was NO correcting them.
    I felt awful for the other kids, but after this group left, we were able to settle down and have a great day with the remaining kids and the museum gave them all free family passes and goody bags from the gift shop to try to make up for the couple of hours where it was NOT fun.

    The director of education asked me if I was sure I had never been in the military as she saw me go literally nose to nose with one kid and tell him to SIT DOWN AND SHUT UP! That if he didn't start listening, I could and would make the rest of his afternoon MISERABLE!!! I was so embarrssed when that she had witnessed that, but she said I had shown more restraint than she had because she said she probably would have slapped him. But she said I looked like any great drill instructor in the face of a recruit screaming at him. I felt bad, but we had tried everything and the only thing that worked with these kids (and it didn't work long) was yelling. I had sent kids out to sit in the hall. We had removed so many kids from the classroom at one point, that we had to have a volunteer walking the hall to make sure they stayed put and left each other alone.

    They had no respect for us, for the museum, for themselves. I know that these kids probably have a horrible home life, but they got a scholarship to come do something fun and they ruined it for themselves by their actions.
    I can honestly say I've never witnessed anything like this and I've worked with underpriveleged kids before, at risk kids, handicapped kids, rich spoiled kids and never had this kind of problem. The entire museum staff was at the boiling point. Normally day camp doesn't affect the other museum vistors or staff, but this did and they had to be removed.

    And I came home and did what any Southern lady of manners does and "took to my bed".
    I was so tense that this morning my neck and shoulders are sore because I tend to clench those muscles when I'm tense.
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  5. #9635
    FORT Fogey ScoutMom's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Wow, these kids sound like they were animals. It's such a shame that the took what could have been a great opportunity for them and ruined it. Then they probably went home and complained about how the museum was so mean to them. Little brats.

  6. #9636
    MRD
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Scoutmom, It was absolutely worse than horrible and they were worse than animals.
    They all tore off their name tags so we wouldn't know who they were and would give us the wrong name if asked. They had a water fight in the bathroom, so from that point on, we had to send them one at a time with a volunteer to the restroom.
    One kid broke another's shoes, so we couldn't do the outside activities after that and they needed to be outside. We finally had to take them to the basement so the rest of the museum wouldn't be affected.

    We had a simple outdoor game where you line them up and then go down the line and each kid is told they are a cat, dog, pig or cow and then to go stand in their group so we could do the activity. We couldn't even get them to line up. They refused to get in a line and when we finally got them in a semblance of a line, if they didn't like the animal they were assigned, they moved. We'd have 2 cows and 8 dogs, so we tried to assign them groups, they wouldn't move to a group, would just stand there. We had the same problem with trying to get them at the tables upstairs. Each table accomodates 4 kids and they wouldn't want to sit at that table or this one.

    And they mocked us when we tried to do anything. I think that is what got to me the most and after one kid tore up something and then mocked me is when I lost it and got in his face and SCREAMED. I did feel bad for screaming, but we had tried humor, we had tried just being firm, we had tried everything and the only way to get their attention was screaming. They knew we couldn't "do" anything to them, so they just did what they wanted without any regard to authority whatsoever. It's a real shame and these kids are the ones that need programs like this because you know that they get NOTHING else from anyone.
    But at what point do you stop feeling sorry for them and realize that all your efforts to be nice have failed and that whatever you do, they are going to take maximum advantage of it. At 11 years old, they are already experts at manipulating grownups.
    It's really sad. It really is. But they will not be coming back at all for anything.

    The musuem cannot have kids that are tearing up property and being uncontrollable when we have other visitors in the museum and property that isn't easily replaced.
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  7. #9637
    FORT Fogey ScoutMom's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    I know exactly how you feel. We had brothers in our Scout troop a while back. They came from a single mom household and got absolutely no support at home. They were both ADHD, but the mom refused to put them on any kind of medication. They were always getting in trouble at school, but the mom always blamed it on someone else - other kids, teachers, principal - whoever. On one camping trip, the one brother lost his temper, picked up a 5 gallon water jug (empty, thank God), and threw it at another kid. The Scoutmaster took the kid outside, and in the meantime, his brother called the police on his cell phone and said they were being abused!! So naturally, the police showed up and after talking to the brothers for about 2 minutes, asked the Scoutmaster if they had their medication that day. Didn't take that police officer long to figure things out.

    Ultimately, we decided, as a committee, that these boys couldn't be served by our Troop any longer, and they were kicked out. I felt horrible. The Scouting program is the perfect place for these boys to be. But we had 30+ other kids to worry about as well. What really concerned me was the anger and how these boys dealt with it. This time, the kid just picked up an empty water jug and threw it. But how did we know the next time he wouldn't grab a knife and really hurt someone? These were Scouts; they use knives. We felt a responsibility to these brothers, but we also felt a responsibility to the rest of the kids. So ultimately, we had to evict them from the Troop.

    I keep reading the paper, because I know it's just a matter of time before these boys are arrested for something. Sad.

  8. #9638
    MRD
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by ScoutMom;3141572;
    I know exactly how you feel. We had brothers in our Scout troop a while back. They came from a single mom household and got absolutely no support at home. They were both ADHD, but the mom refused to put them on any kind of medication. They were always getting in trouble at school, but the mom always blamed it on someone else - other kids, teachers, principal - whoever. On one camping trip, the one brother lost his temper, picked up a 5 gallon water jug (empty, thank God), and threw it at another kid. The Scoutmaster took the kid outside, and in the meantime, his brother called the police on his cell phone and said they were being abused!! So naturally, the police showed up and after talking to the brothers for about 2 minutes, asked the Scoutmaster if they had their medication that day. Didn't take that police officer long to figure things out.

    Ultimately, we decided, as a committee, that these boys couldn't be served by our Troop any longer, and they were kicked out. I felt horrible. The Scouting program is the perfect place for these boys to be. But we had 30+ other kids to worry about as well. What really concerned me was the anger and how these boys dealt with it. This time, the kid just picked up an empty water jug and threw it. But how did we know the next time he wouldn't grab a knife and really hurt someone? These were Scouts; they use knives. We felt a responsibility to these brothers, but we also felt a responsibility to the rest of the kids. So ultimately, we had to evict them from the Troop.

    I keep reading the paper, because I know it's just a matter of time before these boys are arrested for something. Sad.
    That is sad Scoutmom, but we came to the same conclusion as you guys did, at some point you have to look at the rest of the kids, the museum, etc. and figure out that for the greater good, the bad ones have to go.

    I had the same thought that I'm going to see these kids in the paper one day in the police beat column.

    But I bet that those other 30 kids got a great benefit from scouting. We had a problem girl in our troop at one point. In the beginning she was great, but as she reached 13, we had BIG problems and we almost let her go, but we decided that we would try to deal with it (she wasn't violent). I'm glad we were able to stick with her as she really bonded to my co-leader and the co-leader was instrumental in helping her get through most of her teenage years through almost daily phone conversations. She will graduate highschool next year and at one time it was doubtful she would do that.
    But it's a judgement call per kid too.
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  9. #9639
    Never a dull moment! chrelsey's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Wow, MRD, that sounds absolutely awful . . . but, it sounds like y'all did the right thing by calling their daycare and having them come pick them up. I'm just curious - did the person from the daycare have anything to say about their behavior, or at least have the decency to be embarrassed by their behavior? What's sad is that they probably act like this all the time, and I'm sure that they feed off of each other's behavior - so if one of them is doing it, they all kick in, and then it gets to the point of being uncontrollable. I'm glad that you only had to deal with it for a short time and not on an every day basis.

    And, being a Southern Lady too, while I understand you "taking to your bed, I think I would have been "taking out the bottle of wine" . . . but that's just me!
    I don't have OCD, I have CDO. It's like OCD except that the letters are in alphabetical order like they should be!

  10. #9640
    FORT Fogey ScoutMom's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Absolutely - you have to judge each case separately. It was only when it became a safety issue for the rest of the boys that we decided we had to do something. After that it started coming out that the reason why some boys weren't camping any more was because of those brothers. When the brothers left, the kids started coming back.

    I can't say enough about Scouts and other programs that work with kids. For some kids, the adults in those programs are the only support that they get. We have no idea the impact we have on a kid's life - either for better or worse. Sometimes the things that are completely insignificant to use really mean something to a kid. I've been brought to tears at many Eagle Courts of Honor when the Eagle Scout gives his speech at the end thanking various adults who have made a difference in his life.

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