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Thread: FORT Koffee Klatch

  1. #8541
    MRD
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by Ellen;2979711;
    Okay, I do like real barbecue (but not pork) -- "low and slow" is pretty darned awesome! So, in the South, would that make up for my not liking sweet tea, fried anything, or high-fat anything?
    (I know you said you could make me fat without anything fried -- but after working to lose more than 200 pounds, I'm definitely not eager to have to go back to Plus-Size Land!!! I LIKE my size 12 jeans -- which is ultra-plus in California, but tiny when I visit family back in Wisconsin. Go figure.)
    Nor would you like our BBQ. Because in the South BBQ means pork!

    I have lost 150 pounds and I still indulge in Southern favorites, but in moderation now.

    I'm doing a lecture on the history of Southern Cooking and times were h ard for most of the South from the very beginning. Not all of the South was plantations. So a lot of our food culture and the foods we eat and the way we prepare them stem from what was available and what you could get into aq starving belly. Pigs and corn being the two major food groups. Pigs were easy, didn't require a lot of land like cows, were cheaper and dropped litters of pigs, instead of just one calf. Cows back then were scrawny and not generally well known for their meat. Since people used every single part of the pig because they had too, a lot of the lard was used for frying. Most people started out cooking over a hearth, so it was hard to cook things other than frying or stewing them.
    Most people traded for flour, sugar and salt, so those things were not as plentiful and as a result, the majority of food was made from pigs, corn, sweet potatos, squash, beans and whatever wild game was available.
    Since most farmers worked from sunup to sundown and the work was extremely hard, breakfast and dinner (lunch) usually were HUGE. But these people worked it off which is why you don't see photos of too many fat Southerns from the end of the (and actually from before the Revolution) Civil War to after WWII.

    After close to 300 years, these types of foods tend to work themselves into our culture because this was the way "we always ate", b ut now, p eople don't work hard labor like they used too and the fried and fatty foods are a lot worse for us now.

    I've read many accounts where cornbread or a form of it was the main source of food in many poor households until crops came in or until it got cold enough for hog killing time.
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    OMG, having a social life is KILLING me!

    I have been to something almost every night this week and then have worked at the museum several days this week. I'm off to do a tour for special needs children and then we have a HUGE event tonight I'm working.

    I'm hoping I can squeeze in a nap between the two things.

    This is a case of be careful what you wish for. Several months ago I was bemoaning the fact that I had no friends and nothing to do. Since that has changed, I now am bemoaning the fact that it is exhausting!

    I plan on being a complete slug all weekend. I'm not going anywhere or doing anything.

    Really looking forward to this mornings tour. I really love our special needs kids when they come in. They are probably my most favorite groups to work with. And sadly, I am the ONLY docent that will do them. The others are not "comfortable" with those groups.
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    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    mrd, about the southern foods....correct me if I am wrong, but did the slaves get what was left of the pigs and whatever else there was? Isn't that where things like chitterlings came from? I think it would be interesting to address the differences (if any) in the diets (even today) of the southern people, slaves and poor folks included.

    I don't cook worth a darn, but I love this kind of historical information.
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by prhoshay;2981846;
    mrd, about the southern foods....correct me if I am wrong, but did the slaves get what was left of the pigs and whatever else there was? Isn't that where things like chitterlings came from? I think it would be interesting to address the differences (if any) in the diets (even today) of the southern people, slaves and poor folks included.

    I don't cook worth a darn, but I love this kind of historical information.
    The term "eating high on the hog" means that you were wealthy enough to eat the hams and roasts and not the "lower" parts of the pig. The slaves did get the feet, snouts, ears, and the chitterlings and other "parts". The typical sharecropper or farmer usually ate the whole hog including the parts that the in a plantation setting would have gone to the slaves.

    In many instances, slaves were given weekly rations: 1 lb. of pork, 1 sack of cornmeal, etc. many had their own gardens near their quarters to supplement what they were given. The house slaves typically could eat better as they could eat leftovers from what was served to the family.

    Hoecakes started with the slaves. This is basically cornmeal mixed with water, poured on the blade of the hoe and cooked over an open fire.

    When I get my paper written, I'll post it as a blog. It has a lot of historical information about food in it.

    There is a grocery store here that still sells pig snouts, ears, feet, tails, brains, chitterlings, chicken feet, etc. There are a lot of people that still eat this stuff even though they can afford better because this is what thew grew up eating.
    And that is the basis for a lot of Southern foods. At one time these foods were all they had, but it became so ingrained, that it became part of our culture and while we can afford to eat differently now, we don't always. Just like pasta is now considered "typical" Italian food and is part of the Italian culture.

    There is a lot of Nouveau Southern food coming out now. Modern twists on old Southern classics. I recently had pimento cheese bruschetta. It had the regular pimento cheese, but with the addition of feta cheese, served on toasted artisan bread. It was fantastic.

    The interesting thing is that now a lot of Southerns, rich, poor, black or white tend to eat many of the same foods that were once reserved for mostly the poor and the slaves.
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Sounds interesting myrosiedog. I'll be interested in reading your blog when it's ready.
    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;2981966;
    The interesting thing is that now a lot of Southerns, rich, poor, black or white tend to eat many of the same foods that were once reserved for mostly the poor and the slaves.
    Sort of how lobster used to be food for the poor and now it's generally viewed as a "fancy restaurant" type food.
    If you type "google" into google you can break the internet.

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    yay! after sending out resumes for the last month and a half after graduation, somebody finally contacted me back! A fashion design company based in Federal Way, WA. They're looking for an In-House Artist to create illustrations and designs utilizing swarovski crystals for their clothes. I'm suppose to call the lady so she can talk to me more with me, but she was out to lunch when I called, and I missed her initial call. So, here's hoping! *crosses fingers*
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  7. #8547
    FORT Fogey Ellen's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by prhoshay;2981846;
    . . . I love this kind of historical information.
    Me too! Thank you for the food history/anthropology info!
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Way to go SuperBrat! I'll cross my toes for you too!
    Yup, with donuts!!

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Sounds cool, SuperBrat. Good Luck!
    If you type "google" into google you can break the internet.

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;2981047;
    OMG, having a social life is KILLING me!

    I have been to something almost every night this week and then have worked at the museum several days this week. I'm off to do a tour for special needs children and then we have a HUGE event tonight I'm working.

    I'm hoping I can squeeze in a nap between the two things.

    This is a case of be careful what you wish for. Several months ago I was bemoaning the fact that I had no friends and nothing to do. Since that has changed, I now am bemoaning the fact that it is exhausting!

    I plan on being a complete slug all weekend. I'm not going anywhere or doing anything.

    Really looking forward to this mornings tour. I really love our special needs kids when they come in. They are probably my most favorite groups to work with. And sadly, I am the ONLY docent that will do them. The others are not "comfortable" with those groups.

    How wonderful it is to hear that you are having such a great time with your social life lately!! I am so happy for you. Even if it means you're tired. It's totally worth it!!

    I love working with children who have special needs. They are absolutely wonderful and I am so sad over the fact that I haven't been able to get to work for the time I was home from school because I've been so ill.


    Superbrat, I'm sure it will turn out great! Good luck!!

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