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Thread: FORT Koffee Klatch

  1. #6081
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;2724005;
    But at my dad's office, they had the phones with the row of buttons that lit up for each line. I think the max was 4 lines only. And it had the red hold button on the end. I used to get in trouble playing with those buttons.
    This is really sad, but the place where I work, just got rid of our phones like that. I work for a school district and they finally were able to upgrade our phones to new cool ones. Everyone at my Center now has their own line and voicemail finally.

  2. #6082
    It's not easy being green Toad's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    I JUST got A mobile phone that is A camera phone!
    All this time I though I could live without.
    Ribbitt

  3. #6083
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by gabriel;2724163;
    When I was an early teen I worked cleaning offices and those phones fascinated me. Western Electric also had a 5 line plus hold, these were the phones with the square line buttons. A few of the older offices had the old Western Electric with the round line buttons. Most of the offices that had the newer phone equipment also had IBM selectric typewriters with the bouncing ball that could be changed for different type styles.
    I spent most of my early working life using an IBM selectric. The automatic correction key was a LIFESAVER!!!!!!!!!!!!! Before that you had to use that stupid correction "tape" that you inserted between the typewriter key and the paper, typed over the mistake and the tape made it white and then you went back and retyped the correct letter. White out was also a LIFESAVER!!

    I actually learned to type in 9th grade on a manual typewriter. I think the reason I am such a good typist now is that I did learn on the old dinosaurs and when you type for a living and use the older machines, the computer keyboards are SO easy after that, that it's easy to be a fast typist.

    One of my doctor's still has an old selectric in their office. The receptionist says they use it a lot because it works better for typing labels than the fancey computer. I had to ask if they still made the ribbon cartridges for it and yes, they still do!!!!

    (you know, thank goodness I no longer have to bother with changing typewriter ribbon, correction tape or fluid or even having to retype whole iinsurance policies becase they were in triplicate and one mistake could ruin the whole thing. Computers sure have made life easier. Also easier that I'm no longer doing that job. )
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Ah, typing class. Mom forced me to take it my sophomore year. I remember it well We were using manual typewriters, and it took a fair whack to send the keys up into the paper. It took me forever to learn the keyboard, and I never did get comfortable reaching up for the number keys. The teacher tied grades to speed (I think 50 WPM by the end of the year was the standard for an A.) Try as I might, I never could get above about 37 WPM. I had three saving graces that got me an A in the class.
    • There was only one other guy in the class, and he was a screw-up. I suspect that I was graded against him more than I was graded against the girls)
    • I was an extremely good proof-reader.
    • The teacher was impressed with my status as a jock (probably the only one in the entire school who was )

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    I had a pleasant little suprise yesterday. I was making an order at Amazon, something I might do once a year if that, and when I went to check out I had a $10 off coupon waiting on me. I was like, "where did that come from?" But I have a faint memeory of filling out a survey here at FORT and being given a $10 coupon for Amazon. Am I just making that up in my head? It was a nice suprise that the coupon was still waiting on me after all this time.

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by Newfherder;2724989;
    Ah, typing class. Mom forced me to take it my sophomore year. I remember it well We were using manual typewriters, and it took a fair whack to send the keys up into the paper. It took me forever to learn the keyboard, and I never did get comfortable reaching up for the number keys. The teacher tied grades to speed (I think 50 WPM by the end of the year was the standard for an A.) Try as I might, I never could get above about 37 WPM. I had three saving graces that got me an A in the class.
    • There was only one other guy in the class, and he was a screw-up. I suspect that I was graded against him more than I was graded against the girls)
    • I was an extremely good proof-reader.
    • The teacher was impressed with my status as a jock (probably the only one in the entire school who was )
    Aw man, you DID have to really WHACK at those keys. I think it was totally impossible to get 50 wpm on a manual. If so, you had to have had incredibly strong fingers.
    But there was always some satisfaction in whacking that return bar lever.

    I too had a problem on those typewriters reaching for the numbers. It got easier once I was using an electric typewriter later. I just think it was the way those old typewriters were developed.

    My dad's business was started by my great-grandather in 1889, so we had a number of "artifacts" and one was a very, very old typewriter. The keys were not in the same alpha set up as the way they are now. I can't remember exactly how they were set up, but it was not asdf jkl; (gosh, just typing back, brings back to many memories of my typing teacher reciting that one over and over and over. )

    Did you guys ever get those assignments where they had you type certain letters to make a picture? I HATED those stupid things. Mostly X's and O's and stuff. At Christmas we got to make Santa. Whoopie!

    Hey Newf, thought of you speaking of my dad's business. I was talking to my brother and he was asking me what happened to some old survey markers my dad had (I think they went to the hysterical, I mean historical society). They were big pieces of pine bark that had the survey information carved on them. (living here in the "colonies" they look at me like I have 2 heads if I mention Section, Township and Range. ) He and I were laughing at some of the old stuff we used to come across. I know you can appreciate it. The descriptions that started: "start at the tree in the middle of Millers pasture...."
    Aw, those were the days. I'm so glad I don't have to draw that stuff out anymore.
    Last edited by MRD; 12-17-2007 at 09:37 AM.
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  7. #6087
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    I took typing one summer, just for something to do, and we had 1 male in the class. I remember learning to type to classical music! You had to keep time with the music; it was actually rather pleasant. Good ol' "Sister Mary Whatsherface". We used to go to summer school just to have something to do in the summer! After the typing class summer, I started going to co-ed summer school....now that was really fun!! Co-ed AND air conditioning.....what more could a Catholic school girl ask for???
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

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  8. #6088
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by prhoshay;2725068;
    I took typing one summer, just for something to do, and we had 1 male in the class. I remember learning to type to classical music! You had to keep time with the music; it was actually rather pleasant. Good ol' "Sister Mary Whatsherface".
    I'm so glad I was in public school by the time I took typing. I don't think I'd have survived the nuns teaching me typing! I barely survived Catholic school as it was.

    I do remember being let out of school during typing class because Florida had one of their rare HARD freezes and we were sent home because the power company could not keep up with demand and we had rolling blackouts. Of course, having manual typewriters, we could have kept going, but the lights and heat went out. Darn!
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  9. #6089
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Yeah...I remember battling the Royal manual typewriters. The class was at about 9 in the morning, so I guess she was really being merciful by allowing us to use music. Kind of eased you into the day. It was a pretty cool class, with only the pressure you placed on yourself. Rather un-nunlike.
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

    When you throw a rock into a pack of dogs, you know which one you hit by the one that yelps!

  10. #6090
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Typewriter trivia--The first US patent for a typewriter went to a surveyor, William Austin Burt, in 1829

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