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  1. #2411
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
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    I think we grew up in similar families. With parents who did not expect other people to take on the job of turning us into responsible, accountable adults.
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough." - Mario Andretti

  2. #2412
    Best Buddies Gutmutter's Avatar
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    I think most of you would be shocked by what kids get away with in most schools. If the administration doesn't back you up (and we've been through a lot of them - they never uphold their standards for long) there isn't much you can do.
    Count your blessings!

  3. #2413
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    Gut, one of our best friends is a teacher and he told us stories that made us go, "What the...?!!!" One kid didn't think he should have to take gym class and his parents actually backed him up. There was NOTHING wrong with him--no medical condition or anything like that. He just didn't want to. And the idiot parents just sided with the kid. Luckily, the principal sided with the teacher in this case so the kid had to participate. (I remember when I had a broken arm, I still had to attend gym class. I couldn't do a lot of the sports so I was the teacher's aide until my arm healed--helped take roll call, helped keep score during the games, distributed bats and balls etc. I do think it was unfair that the teacher gave me a B, instead of my usual A. I had my arm in a cast and couldn't participate in the physical activities and was punished for it in the grade. But that's another story all together.)

    Quote Originally Posted by cricketeen;2197706;
    I think we grew up in similar families. With parents who did not expect other people to take on the job of turning us into responsible, accountable adults.
    Exactly. A lot of parents these days seem to think that education solely is the responsiblility of the teachers. One of the reasons my siblings and I did well in school isn't because we were smarter than the other kids. It's 'cause our parents made sure we did our homework and encouraged us to read and learn even when we weren't in class. We could go outside and play after our homework was done. If not, no going over to a friend's house or watching TV. It was as simple as that.

  4. #2414
    FORT Fogey Muduh's Avatar
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    Little kids are naturally inquisitive. They are also like sponges. It's our place to supervise what they soak up. When our kid wants to know something, we either drag out our ancient World Books, or I get on the computer and find it. Then I read it to him and let him see the pictures. I'm hoping that he will continue to do it for himself when he gets older. I used the same approach with the older grandkids and it seems to have helped. Anything and everything can be a learning experience. He has recently become very interested in the speed limit signs and making sure they are the same as the one on our dashboard. Push on that accelerator a little too hard and you'll hear about it. He and I play school and he get to "grade" my papers. I don't get as many smilie faces as he does.

  5. #2415
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    Texas Cheerleaders Terrorize School

    You're a good grandma (and a good parent), Muduh!

    Speaking of out of control students, check out this story (and this principal--the mother of the ringleader--got $75,000 and a letter of recommendation? Ugh! Some things are just not right):





    http://articles.news.aol.com/news/_a...00010000000001


    Texas Cheerleaders Terrorize School
    Who's to Blame for These Teenagers Gone Wild?


    (Jan. 4) -- At a high school in McKinney, Texas, officials say a group of five cheerleaders recently got out of control.

    Dubbed the "Fab Five," they acted like they could get away with almost anything and refused to bend to authority. They repeatedly skipped class, insulted their instructors, and terrorized their coach, their fourth coach in just one year.

    The Fab Five even posted sexually suggestive pictures of themselves on MySpace, but that still wasn't enough for the school to take their pompoms away.

    In an exclusive interview with "Good Morning America," Michaela Ward, the coach that the Fab Five drove out, said the girls were beyond discipline.

    "Unfortunately these girls were given power that any teenager would have completely abused. They were untouchable. They were invincible. The rules did not apply to them," Ward said. "There was no accountability. They knew that I had absolutely no power to discipline."

    The school finally took action. Now, two questions are being asked: What took so long? And who is to blame?

    Some are pointing fingers at the mother of the clique's ringleader, who was also the school's principal.

    "This culture developed where the principal's daughter and her friends were above consequences," said attorney Harold Jones, who was hired by the school district to look into complaints about the cheerleaders.

    In his report, Jones found the girls' influence at their high school was pervasive. There seemed to be no limits to their shenanigans.

    "They took my cell phone and sent dirty text messages to my husband and to another coach," Ward said.

    Though Ward was the cheerleading coach, she felt incapable of disciplining the girls.

    "Everything I did, I was undermined by the principal and the administration. I was never kept in the loop," she said.


    "Right after some risque photos are placed on MySpace in their cheerleader uniforms and they're on probation, it takes a whole week to decide that they won't be kicked off the squad," Jones said.

    In December, the principal resigned as part of a settlement in which she received $75,000 and a letter of recommendation for her next job. The former principal's attorney says she denies shielding her daughter from punishment.

    But Jones says it wasn't just the principal who was at fault.

    He says the entire school administration and parents who didn't enforce the rules are also to blame.

    "Kids are going to be kids. They're going to figure out ways to push your limits," Jones said. "Adults have to be adults."

    Rosalind Wiseman, an educator on teens and parenting, and author of the book "Queen Bees and Wannabee's," sees the Texas cheerleading debacle as part of a wider problem with kids and power.

    "This is about kids having more power than adults, and them getting away with things no matter how old they are," she said.

    Wiseman said that if parents wanted to prevent their kids from running amok, they couldn't be afraid to punish them.

    "Some parents today feel that their No. 1 job is to protect their child, and it's not," she said. "Their job is to raise an ethical child, which means holding them accountable for bad behavior."

    When it comes to conflicts in school, Wiseman said parents should steer clear of direct involvement, if possible.

    "Parents should only get involved if their child is being humiliated or ridiculed. But if it's a content issue, meaning a grade or a performance in sports or something else, you need to work with your child to articulate what the problem is and to speak to the coach or the teacher themselves," she said. "You should not do the talking for your child. Let your kid work it out when it comes to grades and playing time."

    Being comfortable talking to people in positions of power can be a valuable skill, one that parents can teach kids early.

    "If your child learns to speak to people in a position of power about something they feel is not right and to articulate how they feel about it, you are teaching your child a very powerful life lesson," Wiseman said.
    Last edited by Lois Lane; 01-07-2007 at 04:49 PM. Reason: Added article about Texas cheerleaders

  6. #2416
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    TSA-approved suitcase locks

    Have any of you traveled (post 9/11) using the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) approved locks on your suitcases? I used to always lock my suitcases, but obviously had to stop doing that after 9/11. I just bought a couple of these TSA-approved locks that were pretty cheap and easy to use. I set my own combination (I didn't want to deal with losing any keys on vacation) and the airport security handlers have access to the key that will open the locks if they need to search it. It sounds like a great idea, and each of the locks is marked as a TSA-approved one. But I keep wondering if some dumbo security handler is going to see a locked suitcase and just break it open with a knife or something without noticing that they have the key to open it. I know, I know. I'm probably worrying about nothing...but just curious how other people have fared with them! Thanks!

  7. #2417
    FORT Fogey Muduh's Avatar
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    Lois my son travels all the time. I'll ask him.

    I bought a new set of luggage yesterday and as I was rolling it out of the store, a salesperson stopped me to look at it and she was telling me that she had some nice luggage and the airline broke one of her locks and lost a key to another. She said they also caved in one whole edge of one case. Sort of made me glad that we take driving vacations.

  8. #2418
    Endlessly ShrinkingViolet's Avatar
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    I have them, Lois, but I don't use them. What's the point when everything is searched, anyway?

  9. #2419
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muduh;2197932;
    Lois my son travels all the time. I'll ask him.
    Thanks Muduh!

    Quote Originally Posted by ShrinkingViolet;2197934;
    I have them, Lois, but I don't use them. What's the point when everything is searched, anyway?
    Yeah, it's not so much for use in the U.S. where they do check them all the time, but for overseas (where they don't seem to as much. I noticed that when we traveled to Australia a year ago, a lot of people had locks on their luggage). I guess I feel a little safer knowing that the average Joe will have to work harder to steal my dirty socks now! Of course, having a lock on it can make it look like I actually have something stealable!

  10. #2420
    Endlessly ShrinkingViolet's Avatar
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    My thinking is if I have it locked, it's a red flag that there is something valuable in there.

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