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Thread: FORT Koffee Klatch

  1. #22531
    Kip
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by Debb70 View Post
    Does it bother anyone that your online activities reveal so much about you? I've heard a story about a woman who defriended all her friends on FB because she thought that they revealed too much about her. And that search engines retain so much info about what you google. She said some will let you see your profile, but they won't allow you to delete it. This kind of bothers me. I think there is a search engine that does not retain your search history, but I'm not sure of the details. I think it's called duckduckgo. Anyone use it?
    I have a Facebook account, but I don't use it. I had to sign up once to be able to access a client's FB page. It's amazing how much information people put online about themselves. One good thing about FB is that it's helped the police solve a lot of crimes as they discuss crimes with their friends and even post photos of their loot. The IRS has used FB and emails to catch people cheating on their taxes. If someone claims a business travel expense, the IRS might look for FB or email evidence to the contrary (for example, an email to a relative about visiting them). Amazingly, a lot of email providers were turning emails over to the IRS without subpeonas. The ACLU was trying to stop that practice, but I don't know how it ended up.

    I've used duckduckgo on occasion, but don't usually. I started to after reading how search engine companies were turning search history over to law enforcement upon request. I don't have anything to hide, but it shouldn't be that easy. The one thing I've worried about in my search history is searching for medical conditions as in the last 3 years I've taken care of 4 ailing relatives. With searches on heart disease, diabetes, multiple myeloma, uterine cancer, and more, I was worried when applying for health insurance that the insurance company might somehow be checking my search history and think I was a real medical mess.

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by KatesMom View Post
    I wish some adults would get that as well. I always read an email and ask myself how I would feel if I saw it plastered over the internet before I go ahead and send it - because the reality is . . that could happen!
    Yeah, lots of adults don't get that about nude photos either. Even if it's your spouse taking the photo, they might not be your spouse forever.
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    FORT Fogey captain's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    The kids can be charged with Child Pornography. This is what they do not understand. It is illegal to possess, take, post, nude pictures of children.
    I know parents take "cute" photos of their babies in the tub, in the nude and do not think of it as illegal. But once the picture is posted for friends and family it becomes available to the type of people who use it for their own gratification. This is how a lot of the pictures found on pedophiles computers come from. Once the picture is on the pedophiles computer he/she sends it to others. It is a vicious circle.
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by Debb70 View Post
    The youngest female student involved in the instagram nude photo scandal in NC is 14. It seems to be very widespread. I'm not sure what the SBI can do about it. It would be very expensive to prosecute all those people. I assume they would only prosecute those over 16, since in NC that's the age at with they leave the juvenile court system.
    My thought was they might be looking for a smaller group of people who could be "collecting" these photos that are being passed about by text and posting them online for a broader audience.
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Hopefully everyone involved - and everyone made aware of it - will at least have learned a lesson from this.

    I wonder what they're teaching in schools about this stuff. My youngest is 29, so FB and Instagram wasn't around when she was in high school, but she was taught at school to be skeptical of any information on the internet that isn't backed up with references, and to never put any personal information online. Things have changed so much since then.

    AOL instant messenger was big back when my son was in high school. One Saturday my son was with me at my office. Some girl he didn't know started instant messaging him randomly - maybe she searched for people near her. From the information she gave out, he realized it was the younger sister of a girl in his class. I called the girl's mother to let her know - because this girl had no idea who she was talking to and giving out her name and school and city - but the mother didn't seem to take too kindly to my calling (or maybe she was just embarrassed).

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Honestly, I don't think most teens learn much from experience anymore. Rules, laws. etc. don't mean much. They probably never let up after the police and SBI Agents left their house. Probably never lost phone privleges or anything. That's just what I see with my family and friends. Most people are so addicted to their phone, that it's not something that can be taken from a child, since that would like depriving them of air or water. lol I'm not kidding. Maybe it's just like this in NC, but here it's an epidemic.

    This past Sunday, there was a lady in our church who is in her 40's who was texting and browsing the web during Sunday service! This is a lady who has attended church her entire life and should know better, but today when it comes to phones, there is no limit apparently. Even attorneys sit in the courtroom and do it all the time. I think it's disrespectful, but it's allowed.

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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Quote Originally Posted by Kip View Post
    I wonder what they're teaching in schools about this stuff. My youngest is 29, so FB and Instagram wasn't around when she was in high school, but she was taught at school to be skeptical of any information on the internet that isn't backed up with references, and to never put any personal information online. Things have changed so much since then.
    I have four kids between 9 and 20. Honestly, I'm not aware of my kids getting education about this stuff at school. I assume I need to cover the topic. We require the computer to be located in our living room so it is always under adult supervision. For any website that wants personal info, they have to check with me. Any registrations are done with MY e-mail address and they are not allowed to disclose their personal info. Their real names cannot be used in any kind of user name. I also am highly restrictive of online games that allow any kind of "open free form interactive communication" (where anything can be said to any user logged in to the interface). For younger kids communication is sometimes allowed, but limited to pre-defined phrases which is much less concerning.

    Our rule for FB has been they can get it when they get to high school, but they are required to be friends with mom and dad. I think too many middle school aged kids can be cruel and feel invincible with the lack of face-to-face that a computer provides. If we have any concerns we would require them to log into their account and allow us access. This is necessary since even when we are friends with them, they can limit access to certain content by creating groups. With the oldest two they only use FB casually and we never felt the need to check up on their accounts. The youngest two haven't reached high school yet, so we have more parenting to come. Frankly, when it comes to FB I'm more concerned about what my son's girlfriend posts. If a potential employer saw her content, I cannot imagine it would come across as positive.

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    FORT Fogey Ellen's Avatar
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    I think educating kids about the Internet, etc., is the parents' domain.
    Teachers have more than enough to do, for which we aren't paid. Seriously.

    (And we'll likely pick up the slack on this as well. On our own.)
    Last edited by Ellen; 02-27-2014 at 05:10 PM.
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    One of the teachers on my team (middle school) has a daughter who is our student. Their rule is that the parents get to have access to all their social media accounts. This teacher does regular monitoring and has found one boy in our classes whose instagram page was all pictures of weed. I let him know the next day when I took attendance that he should be more careful and the fear/shock/guilt/paranoia that flashed across his face made my day. They really have no idea.
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  10. #22540
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    Re: FORT Koffee Klatch

    Our kids had computers in their rooms without Internet access so they could write reports, etc. The only computer with Internet access was in our kitchen.

    I set some automated parental controls once, and then my son asked me why he couldn't go to the Lamplighters site anymore. Lamplighters is a group in San Francisco that puts on Gilbert & Sullivan productions. The parental control things obviously didn't work well, so I took it off.

    Quote Originally Posted by Debb70 View Post
    ...This past Sunday, there was a lady in our church who is in her 40's who was texting and browsing the web during Sunday service! This is a lady who has attended church her entire life and should know better, but today when it comes to phones, there is no limit apparently. Even attorneys sit in the courtroom and do it all the time. I think it's disrespectful, but it's allowed.
    So many people seem like they can't be away from their phones for more than a minute. A couple of weeks ago, on a Sunday morning, I met my daughter and the 2 1/2 year old she's a nanny for at the local kids' gym. Two things struck me. First, two thirds to three quarters of the parents there were dads. I thought they were dads having weekend visitation/custody; my daughter thought it was dads letting the moms sleep in on Sunday morning. Second was the fact that probably about 3/4 of the parents had their heads in their phones the whole time. They'd kind of stumble around following their kid, but didn't interact with the kids much. Sad.

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