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  1. #1291
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog View Post
    We are painting this weekend. We bought a deep, luscious red for the living room with cream trim and we bought a forest green for the entryway and our bedroom. We have white wicker furniture in our bedroom, so this out to look great. Our bedding is plaids and florals in yellow, green, red and blue.
    .
    myrosiedog: I applaud your use of intense colours! My attitude towards colour is identical to Dorothy Draper's, "I'm allergic to beige."

    In my other computer, I have shots of the apartments interior; when I go to the other one, I'll post photos of our gold/aubergine/turquoise living room.

    What color is the Flamingo room going to be? My art room is pure white; I have my decorations provide the colour and like you, use a lot of my old family treasures to supply the interest.

    Muduh: Thanks for the update on the church. I hope it was "an act of God" and not an arson attack.

    I moved THIS from the Pet Peeves thread; it ties into the Thank You Note talk we were having, but it's not a peeve, more of an idea.

    Does anyone else here practice their version of "Random Acts of Kindness Day?" This was something that my Grandma taught me and I've continued it to this day.

    When we canned, she always put up a little bit extra for "the Widow Ladies and Gents" as she called them. When she made her canned peaches or applesauce, she'd have Grandpa drive her around the surrounding farm area and she'd walk up to the doors, leave a jar with a small note and then just leave. Then, when folks would go out to get the mail or hang up the wash, they'd find the "random" gifts and they'd be doubly appreciated, because it was something unexpectedly nice and with no hidden agenda. Grandma never mentioned it to the person, such as "Did you get the sauce I left you." If no one said anything, she didn't mention it; she didn't want anyone to think she was "giving charity".

    What I do, is when some expensive store is closing out an item, like Godiva chocolates reducing by 50% their holiday candies, I'll buy a bag of them. Then, when I see the Post Mistress or my favourite bank teller, I just slide it over to them and when they say, "What's THIS for?", I smile and say, "It's Random Acts of Kindness Day and I appreciate what you do for me on a daily basis." Everyone likes to be recognized and 'seen' and so many of the common jobs become invisible to others. Yes, I know that the bank teller, gas attendent and others are doing the job that they are being paid for, but why shouldn't I give them equal or more attention than spending time reading about Tom Cruise or Jessica Simpson?

    One of the nicest compliments paid to me was by our old postmistress, who was retiring after 28 years. (I had only known her for 4) She left a letter in my P.O. Box, when she left, and among other things, said, "I still have that pretty gold box that the candy came in that you gave me so long ago! You have no idea how much that meant to me." Well, she's right; until she told me, I had NO idea what it meant to Connie...I just did it to do it.

    Small acts of kindness continue to grow, long after you do them. And the actual cost is insignificant compared to the good will you spread.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  2. #1292
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    myrosiedog, happy painting! Those are some awesome colors you've got going -- I think my favorite combo might be the one for your daughter's room!

    lambikins, what a good idea. I will have to think of doing something like that. You're right--it really doesn't cost that much and the recipients, I'm sure, are very appreciative of your thoughtfulness.

  3. #1293
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lois Lane View Post
    myrosiedog, happy painting! Those are some awesome colors you've got going -- I think my favorite combo might be the one for your daughter's room!

    lambikins, what a good idea. I will have to think of doing something like that. You're right--it really doesn't cost that much and the recipients, I'm sure, are very appreciative of your thoughtfulness.
    Lois Lane: I'm glad that you, too, think it a good idea. I'm certainly not the author of it, being that I learned it at my Grandma's knees. I always found it amusing, that my Gran would always talk about "helping out the Old Ladies" at the various Old Folks Homes, but she was at least 10+ years older than any of these other people! But, she was blessed with wonderful genetics so her 60's was like other's 40's. I remember her skin; it felt like rose petals. Now I'm getting all misty about my Gran.

    But, in her days, they had all these cool customs, like May Day, when you'd go from door to door of your neighbors and leave little baskets of flowers and treats at your friends doorstep but NEVER leave a note as to who left them. It was magical yet inexpensive. She'd use tin cans or old jelly jars, pick some peonies or lilacs from the garden and drop them off. She told me that when she was a little girl, in the 1890's, all the people used to do that.

    A pretty cool custom, if you ask me.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  4. #1294
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    Unfortunately nowadays, most people wouldn't eat food left on their porch 'cause they'd be afraid they'd have poison or razor blades in them. You know, the soup kitchens say they always need help year round--not just during the holidays. And they need behind the scenes help--not just the "showy" job of serving up the meals...

    This is a wonderful reminder to do a little something nice for someone just 'cause. Your grandma sounds like she was a wonderful lady!

  5. #1295
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lois Lane View Post
    Unfortunately nowadays, most people wouldn't eat food left on their porch 'cause they'd be afraid they'd have poison or razor blades in them. You know, the soup kitchens say they always need help year round--not just during the holidays. And they need behind the scenes help--not just the "showy" job of serving up the meals...

    This is a wonderful reminder to do a little something nice for someone just 'cause. Your grandma sounds like she was a wonderful lady!
    Thanks, Lois Lane. Both my Gran and Grandpa were great people that taught me everything that I needed to know in life. But, where Grandpa was the Jolly Fellow who was a hoot at every get together, he was pretty passive; Grandma had to crack the whip on his behind on a daily basis. I remember, as a kid, my Grandpa had wanted to "sleep in", now that he was in his early 70's. She'd come into their bedroom, sharp at 7:00 am, and yell, "SAM! Only the sick and pregnant get to lol about in bed!"; and so he'd amble out to the kitchen to start his day.

    I think that old farm communities were a lot like the Amish still are, today. My Gran's childhood house burnt down 3 times, due to kerosene lamps and stove fires and the neighbors helped them build them each time. Fire took out so many barns and homes in those days; look at the City of Chicago...supposedly, a cow in a barn burnt the city to the ground.

    I agree that I was lucky beyond measure to have 19th Century values pumped into me as a kidlet, growing up. Regarding what you said about the Food Pantries and Soup Kitchens, you're so right. But volunteer work, in ANY area, is so needed and invaluable. We ALL have so many personal strengths and wisdom that can be passed onto others. I do my form of volunteer work through teaching facilites: Field Museum, Community Outreach Programs, and being on an availability list to Grade Schools, where you go to the school and teach the kids about insects, plants, glaciers...you name it. I've taught from pre-school to senior citizen centers; just simple stuff, but things that make people more aware of what the environment has to offer. My favourite class I ever taught was one that was held at night in a nature sanctuary in the suburbs; you escorted each person to an area along a nature trail and just left them there...without flash lights, ipods or any piece of civilization. Then, half an hour later, you picked each person up along the trail and we all met at a bonfire. We sat around the fire and shared what we had all heard, felt, smelled. It was one of the best classes I've ever taught; there were some people who had never been alone, in the dark, in their life!

    So, whatever a person's strengths are: computer skills, car repair, cooking, sewing or just listening, there's so many places that they can volunteer their skills and so many people that are desperate to recieve them.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  6. #1296
    MRD
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    THanks everyone. I am NOT on the ladder. Family knows better. I am doing what I can do from flat on the floor. Well my feet flat on the floor.
    And my knee is MUCH better thank you.

    I have a friend Doxie that collects Penguins and she has a 5 year old daughter and after seeing some penguin movie (might have been march of the penguins or something else), she has started calling her mother, "the big penguin" so everyone else has picked up on it too and its hilarious. She fortunately thinks its funny and isn't repulsed by it.

    My daughter's room is looking awesome. I will post pics when we are done. The foyer in the dark green looks faboo too.
    My craft room will stay white as there is PINK everywhere you look as I have about 40 flamingo items of all kinds that I've collected over the years.
    I saw pink fabric with fushia polka dots and I think I'll make a valance with that. But there is so much pink, that the walls really need to stay white.

    It took most of the day to strip wallpaper, UGH.

    Our house is not huge and the rooms are small in size, so the painting really won't take that long. We knocked out 2 rooms today and will get to the other 3 this week or next. I say we. I did not paint. I did wall paper stripping and sofa shopping. It just feels good to finally make this place ours. Put our mark on it (and get rid of the awful, awful, wallpaper)

    And then I bought a sofa so had to go back and get it with the truck. So now the dogs have a nice comfy place to sleep as they just couldn't stand having to sleep in those nice soft dog beds any longer.
    We had been sitting in the 3 bears chairs for almost 2 months and it was a fight to see who got the comfortable chair. But I found something we can all live with in the family room. Hubby gets the recliner and the dogs get the sofa. I guess Lucy and I will have to find other places to sit.
    Last edited by MRD; 10-07-2006 at 10:13 PM.
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  7. #1297
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    I saw my Baba today and tried to ask her about her old recipe for popovers but she wasn't quite with it. Her medication was kicking in and she had trouble focussing. We did have a lovely visit; she adored my red, black and gold corderouy fall coat but said I needed some hair spray. She's still with it even when she's not all there!

    Lambikins: Yes, I do try to do some random acts of kindness. People certainly do appreciate it. Even if you give someone a shopping buggy with your $1 still in it! But I loved the stories about your grandma and the flowers on the steps and such. I think people had a deeper appreciation of little things in those days than these days.

    I gave a little gold box with an angel on it to a waitress at the little coffee place down the street. I had visited there many times with my ex. I found out she was a twin too and we had some good little chats. One day, much later, when I was not feeling well, my sister and I stopped in to get a brownie to share as we went for a walk. She saw I looked kinda bad and gave me a free brownie so we wouldn't have to share. It was one of the nicest things at the time and brightened my day. I left the box with a little note to put her tips in there to save up to see her twin sister who lived on the coast. She wasn't in at the time and was absolutely amazed that I even thought about it.

    Another time I took a class in photography in negative retouching. I was on medication and discovered very quickly that I could not do it because my hands shook. I had bought about $100 in supplies that were basically worthless. So I stopped into a photo studio that I knew did really nice work and just gave the supplies to the manager. His jaw dropped. He couldn't thank me enough as they were quality Kodak materials. He wanted to give me something, but I just refused. It felt really good.

    I also liked your class out in the woods. That's great! Especially with the bonfire later!

    myrosiedog: Hey, sounds like you did some great work already! I'm sure it looks fantastic! Nice that the flamingos get a chance to stretch in their new home! I am pretty lucky as I've never had to strip wallpaper.
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  8. #1298
    MRD
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    Quote Originally Posted by lambikins View Post
    myrosiedog: I applaud your use of intense colours! My attitude towards colour is identical to Dorothy Draper's, "I'm allergic to beige."

    In my other computer, I have shots of the apartments interior; when I go to the other one, I'll post photos of our gold/aubergine/turquoise living room.

    What color is the Flamingo room going to be? My art room is pure white; I have my decorations provide the colour and like you, use a lot of my old family treasures to supply the interest.

    Muduh: Thanks for the update on the church. I hope it was "an act of God" and not an arson attack.

    I moved THIS from the Pet Peeves thread; it ties into the Thank You Note talk we were having, but it's not a peeve, more of an idea.

    Does anyone else here practice their version of "Random Acts of Kindness Day?" This was something that my Grandma taught me and I've continued it to this day.

    When we canned, she always put up a little bit extra for "the Widow Ladies and Gents" as she called them. When she made her canned peaches or applesauce, she'd have Grandpa drive her around the surrounding farm area and she'd walk up to the doors, leave a jar with a small note and then just leave. Then, when folks would go out to get the mail or hang up the wash, they'd find the "random" gifts and they'd be doubly appreciated, because it was something unexpectedly nice and with no hidden agenda. Grandma never mentioned it to the person, such as "Did you get the sauce I left you." If no one said anything, she didn't mention it; she didn't want anyone to think she was "giving charity".

    What I do, is when some expensive store is closing out an item, like Godiva chocolates reducing by 50% their holiday candies, I'll buy a bag of them. Then, when I see the Post Mistress or my favourite bank teller, I just slide it over to them and when they say, "What's THIS for?", I smile and say, "It's Random Acts of Kindness Day and I appreciate what you do for me on a daily basis." Everyone likes to be recognized and 'seen' and so many of the common jobs become invisible to others. Yes, I know that the bank teller, gas attendent and others are doing the job that they are being paid for, but why shouldn't I give them equal or more attention than spending time reading about Tom Cruise or Jessica Simpson?

    One of the nicest compliments paid to me was by our old postmistress, who was retiring after 28 years. (I had only known her for 4) She left a letter in my P.O. Box, when she left, and among other things, said, "I still have that pretty gold box that the candy came in that you gave me so long ago! You have no idea how much that meant to me." Well, she's right; until she told me, I had NO idea what it meant to Connie...I just did it to do it.

    Small acts of kindness continue to grow, long after you do them. And the actual cost is insignificant compared to the good will you spread.
    I often pay the toll for the car behind me at toll booths.

    My dad used to do this and I have done it once as the opportunity never arose but once. But if he was out to dinner or in a bar (lounge sounds so much nicer as he and my mom usually went to places they could dance. so they were more like cocktail lounges than bars), if there was a table with servicemen, he would have the waitress give them a round of drinks on him. He said that when he was a young serviceman, several older gentlemen did this for him and it was always appreciated as he said he never had much money. I've seen him do this many times and only one time has one of the service men come over to our table (the waitress always would point and tell them when they asked where the round came from) shook my dad's hand and thanked him. He didn't do it for that, he did it because he remembered what it was like being a long way from home usually and short of money.

    I used to leave may baskets at the homes of some of our older church members. Just flowers, but they always loved them.

    Our new neighbor here has been so nice that I made dinner last weekend for her family and took it over.

    But I should do more acts of kindness besides letting a car out in front of me which is probably the nicest thing I do for strangers.

    lambi, those are great things to do, I applaud you and all those people out there that volunteer their time. It is so much appreciated, let me tell you. I have done a lot of volunteer work in my day and I have been in charge of getting volunteers for varous things and not many people like to volunteer or don't have time. It's so rewarding to feel that you made someone smile or helped an organization that needed it. I don't know why people don't do more volunteer work. I love it.

    our new church hosts homeless families for a week. We feed them, they sleep in the church, get to bathe and shower, etc. We all pitch in making food, sitting with them, etc. Our own family day is coming up on Oct. 17, we are cooking, serving and eating with them. All the churches around here belong to this program so there are many churches that participate and the families don't have to live on the streets, they go from church to church and the churches also try to help them get jobs and find shelter, furniture, etc.

    I was also a girl scout leader for 5 years. What a great experience and you don't have to have kids or your kids can be grown, to be a girl or boy scout leader. There are so many kids that need this experience and need a good role model in their life. We had a girl in our troop that had no good home life, had no role model on how to behave and her time with us, she absolutely loved. I saw her just before we moved, she is 16 now and she came up and hugged me and thanked me for being her leader and told me that girl scouts got her through some rough times at home. NOTHING compares to hearing something like that.
    Last edited by MRD; 10-08-2006 at 07:49 AM.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
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  9. #1299
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    misskitty & myrosiedog: I enjoyed your stories of Random Acts of Kindness so much, I read them several times. I particularly enjoyed the story about the Serviceman and the drinks.

    It takes SO little effort to do something nice. As you know, I love to bake, but when I'm out at the cottage, I don't have my posse out there to help eat the extras. So, when I crave muffins or cookies, I'll bake up a batch, but give all the extras away. I'll just use that pretty coloured Saran Wrap, tuck 2-3 cookies in a square, wrap each bundle up with a bit of ribbon, and then when I go to the bank, just drop them off.

    Or what's also nice, is to treat the Toll Booth operators to a small "break". During the holidays, I'll buy shrink-wrapped candies or cookies (so that they know they're safe food products) and when I go through a manned toll booth, I just hand them the small package and my toll. They're so used to the anonymity of drivers that to be seen and even thought of as a person just perks them right up.

    There's a cool commercial out now; have no idea what it's pitching because I've become so engrossed by the concept vs. the product. It's based on the [i]Pay it Forward[/b] concept but with a twist: it shows someone doing a simple act of kindness towards another person BUT...it's a different person witnessing the act of kindness that the commercial shows doing the next kindness.

    I've put this to the test and it works virtually 100% percent. If you're standing in a grocery line and you see a person coming up behind you, I hand them the line divider, but make eye contact with them and give them a smile. Sure enough, when someone comes behind that person, THEY give that person the line divider, with a small acknowledgement, too.

    Same goes for traffic, at least in Chicago. I've let someone into a lane, they wave, and usually within a 1 block drive, THEY are allowing someone in ahead of them.

    It's these tiny, 1 second exchanges that can just turn a day around.

    With so much talk on the PET PEEVE thread about what bugs us, I wonder if we put 10 minutes of Pay It Forward action into each day, how many less things we'd have that would bug us. Yeah, I know there's the perennially thoughtless clods, like my acquaintence Mary, that couldn't buy a clue, but sometimes, people just need to be reawakened to civility.

    Anywho, I liked both of your stories. They made a pleasant start to a pretty Sun-day. Thanks for sharing them.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  10. #1300
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    Great stories:

    I've noticed that a lot of elderly people really notice and acknowledge little things like opening the door, asking if they need help with something, even a smile and "nice day" comment. So many people are in such a hurry they just rush about everywhere and don't even have a clue who is around them.

    I also notice that taking a second to look at the cashier and saying Thank you (insertnameon badge) makes them smile. It's not the spit - out thanks as you are walking away. And little kids too. I always do the courtesy wave for cars everwhere I go and it makes me feel great when it's actually acknowledged in return. (many don't do that).

    Of course I usually can't resist saying something nice to anyone who has a pet with them; little dog, bit dog, ferret, whatever. It's a great opportunity to recognize and give a compliment to a person or show a bit of interest. I love going to the pet store when there's aminals there
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

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