+ Reply to Thread
Page 18 of 126 FirstFirst ... 891011121314151617181920212223242526272868118 ... LastLast
Results 171 to 180 of 1251

Thread: Gas Prices

  1. #171
    Ms Ambusher dberk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Age
    56
    Posts
    4,461
    Last month we were asked if we would be interested in working from home. This would save me a lot of gas money.

  2. #172
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In the Kat House in Kanada
    Posts
    7,704
    I agree with this

    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  3. #173
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    running for the border
    Age
    53
    Posts
    6,776
    Quote Originally Posted by Igotalife View Post
    But I agree, fuel alternatives are needed. I hate seeing our open waters polluted with rigs.
    Unfortunately, most people I know are not one bit interested in any kind of alternative. They still want their big, v-8, gasoline engines, and they drive them like bats out of hell burning even more gas. They just want cheap gas to put in them!
    I've been trying something very, very, hard for me...slowing down! If I go 60, instead of ahhh, way faster, and drive smoothly with no quick takeoffs, I do seem to save at least a gallon a day. I'm having to leave for work a little early, and the cars flying by me at 75-85 mph are scary, but I'm still trying!
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  4. #174
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hi, Olivia!
    Posts
    2,312
    Give this tool by MSN a try. Of the three online sites I tried (the other two were GasBuddy and MyWikiMap), MSN's tool seemed the most comprehensive and updated. Searches are performed via your ZIP code, of course. Good luck.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  5. #175
    Peace MsFroggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Up here in my tree...
    Posts
    15,532
    Quote Originally Posted by phat32 View Post
    Give this tool by MSN a try. Of the three online sites I tried (the other two were GasBuddy and MyWikiMap), MSN's tool seemed the most comprehensive and updated. Searches are performed via your ZIP code, of course. Good luck.
    Thanks for that tool. It will keep me from going to the nearest to me gas station (which I've been frequenting so far) where gas prices are the highest in the area!
    "Feel the sky blanket you/ With gems and rhinestones/ See the path cut by the moon/ For you to walk on" - EV

  6. #176
    Dreamer rt1ky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Trying to free myself from the snarkside.
    Posts
    3,153

    Gas prices outpace cost of oil

    I wasn't sure if I should post this in the Current Events thread or here.

    I wish the city I live in had a large, more available, mass transit system. You almost have to drive to get anywhere here.

    High crude oil prices aren't the only reason you're paying $3.15 for a gallon of regular.

    For America's giant gasoline refiners -- some of whom are expected to report multibillion-dollar profits this week -- this is a golden age.

    By California state estimates, refinery profit margins have more than doubled in 2006, though that figure doesn't take into account some key expenses. Meanwhile, oil prices have risen by 14 percent.

    Earlier this week, Valero Energy Corp., the country's largest refiner, reported the highest first-quarter profits in its history, $849 million, up 60 percent from the same period last year. The company's top executive credited the jump, in part, to record profit margins that he cheerfully predicted would last through the summer.

    Exxon Mobil, the world's largest publicly traded oil company, will report its results today. San Ramon's Chevron Corp. will follow suit Friday. Wall Street analysts expect big profits from both, with refineries bringing in far more of the cash than they once did.

    Oil industry critics hunting for proof of price gouging point to refineries' expanding profit margins as evidence. Oil companies, they say, can control the price they charge for refined gasoline far more than they can influence the price of crude. Whereas crude oil prices are set by a global market, the market for refined fuel tends to be more local, with more limited supplies. That narrows the competition refiners face and gives them more leeway in what they can charge.

    In addition, critics say the companies deliberately closed many U.S. refineries years ago as a way to drive up their margins. The country now has 144 refineries, down from 324 in 1981.


    "The refining business used to be pretty lousy, but they took very aggressive actions to correct that," said Tyson Slocum, director of the energy program at the Public Citizen watchdog group. "They're choosing not to build new refineries because it's not in their economic interest."

    Some also wonder if the companies are testing drivers' willingness to pay higher prices. Refinery profit margins aren't the biggest component of retail gasoline prices -- crude oil is the largest, and taxes take a sizable chunk -- but they have a direct impact on prices at the pump.

    "If gas companies know that they'll sell as much of their product at $3 as they do at $2.50 per gallon, what do you think they're going to do?" said Sean Comey, spokesman for the AAA of Northern California auto club.


    Refiners maintain they'd be happy to build more refineries if they could find towns and cities willing to host them. And they bristle at the suggestion that they're raising prices more than necessary as some kind of market test.

    "A company that does that is risking market share, because not everyone's going to along with it," said Joe Sparano, president of the Western States Petroleum Association, which represents several refiners. "And God help them if they do it when oil prices are going down."

    Exact profit margins for the industry are difficult to track, because the companies involved don't reveal financial details that could help their competition.

    The California Energy Commission publishes a loose weekly estimate, measuring the difference between what the state's 21 refineries pay for crude oil and what they charge for their products. Since the start of the year, that figure has jumped 130 percent, from 30 cents for each gallon of finished gasoline to 69 cents last week. During the same time, the price refiners pay for crude oil has increased 14 percent.

    Sparano noted, however, that the energy commission's numbers don't take into account many of the refiners' costs, such as buying chemical additives to blend into their gasoline and paying other companies to store it.

    "In the case where it's 30 cents, no one -- including the CEC and me -- can tell you how much of that is cost and how much is profit," said Sparano. As head of a trade organization, he is prevented by antitrust laws from seeing precise profit details of the companies he represents.

    The federal government keeps similar statistics, calculated in much the same way as the state's. They show a hefty 34.8 percent increase in refining margins nationwide in 2005 compared with 2004 -- which had been considered a strong year.

    Those statistics, however, show that the margins barely kept pace with growth in the price of unrefined oil. The amount refiners spent on crude grew 36.6 percent during 2005, according to the federal Energy Information Administration. Similar figures for the start of 2006 won't be available until oil companies finish reporting the first quarter results.

    Even so, refinery profit margins are about to get more scrutiny.

    They will be one of the subjects of California's latest investigation into rising gasoline prices, announced by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger Tuesday.

    Past investigations in the state have been unable to prove market manipulation or price gouging. A 2004 study by the federal Government Accountability Office, however, concluded that oil company mergers and acquisitions from the mid-1990s through 2000 had pushed up California's gasoline prices about 7 cents, in part by consolidating control over refineries in the hands of fewer companies.
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/04/27/REFINERS.TMP

  7. #177
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In the Kat House in Kanada
    Posts
    7,704
    ..."If gas companies know that they'll sell as much of their product at $3 as they do at $2.50 per gallon, what do you think they're going to do?" said Sean Comey, spokesman for the AAA of Northern California auto club...
    That's the point. Who has the power? If the people drastically cut back and complain and raise a riot (a peaceful one) then those with the product have to comply with those who want the product in order to remain viable.

    The power is in the people. The people just don't want the power because it may mean changing their lifestyle habits and may have to either do something different (ride a bike, car-pool), or limit their own gas consumption per household.

    It's the simple rule of supply and demand. Only in this case, it's dollars and demand. If the demand for the oil supplies drop, then the dollar value should drop accordingly. It's all up to us. As I see it.

    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  8. #178
    FORT Fanatic imajunkie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    609
    Quote Originally Posted by misskitty View Post
    It's the simple rule of supply and demand. Only in this case, it's dollars and demand. If the demand for the oil supplies drop, then the dollar value should drop accordingly. It's all up to us. As I see it.
    Or in our case a simple rule of I want it and you got it so I'm gonna take it

    Long story short our tank was filled yesterday ($75 worth) and I parked in the driveway last night because the garage door has been acting up. Hubby went to go to work this morning and the tank is EMPTY. Great way to start the weekend

  9. #179
    FORT Fogey PGM35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Round Rock, TX
    Age
    44
    Posts
    2,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Igotalife View Post
    It cost me $56 to fill up my 20 gallon SUV this weekend and I average 19.3 miles per gallon (which I thought at the time wasn't so bad, but now..... )
    Still driving that Nissan Murano? That's what I have as well and I only have been putting $20 in at a time - I only drive about 15 miles per day so it's not so bad. I just paid $2.76 / gal and some places I passed on the way to HEB were $2.85 / gal. B/F drives a diesel and saw that price at $2.85 / gal and at HEB it was $2.66 / gal

  10. #180
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    52
    Posts
    16,893
    Quote Originally Posted by imajunkie2 View Post
    Or in our case a simple rule of I want it and you got it so I'm gonna take it

    Long story short our tank was filled yesterday ($75 worth) and I parked in the driveway last night because the garage door has been acting up. Hubby went to go to work this morning and the tank is EMPTY. Great way to start the weekend
    I remember in the 70's during the oil embargo we had gas theft and my parents bought a locking gas cap. The idiots even left the siphon hose they used in our driveway.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.