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Thread: Gardening

  1. #651
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Again, it can't hurt to let it dry out, MRD. But roses are picky things, and it may hate its container, gotten a fungus infection, or any of a variety of other diseases. I used to grow roses, but they need so much care if they are not in an absolutely ideal situation, that I switched for peonis which bloom less but don't need babying. Any serious rose-growers here?
    Sice the leaves are gone, do cut off the last 6 inches or so of a stem and examine it. If it's dried out that far down, you may be trying to raise the dead, unfortunately.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  2. #652
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Gardening

    Both houses that I've bought in my lifetime have had roses in the yards when I've bought them -- if they did not, I would not plant them on my own. My maintenence of them has kind of reflected that ... I do enough to care for them, but don't baby them the way that one should wtih roses. I cut them back very early in the Spring, fertilize as needed, spray with a rose spray when I notice black spots, and dead head. that's about it. In my old house, one of the roses survived thatapproach, one did not. In my current house, they all seem to be thriving.

    I've always thought that sweetheart roses were even more tempremental, but I don't know if that's because its true, or if somewhere at somepoint that just popped in my mind and I've left it there. For my money, the cutting it back and looking at the stem advice is the most valuable. I knew it was time to dig up the one that I lost instead of just pruning and fertilizing it when I cut back and cut back, and all I got was stick.

  3. #653
    MRD
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    Re: Gardening

    Thanks. I'll cut it back. It was doing SO well after going through a really rough spot and I was so happy it was doing well. I had been told to not baby it too much, so I didn't and that's when it came back. I was feeling the soil and it's still damp. We got a lot of rain in the past week. It's in a pot, so maybe I need to move it w hen it rains so it doesn't get too much rain. Maybe it has root rot or something. All the leaves have pretty much fallen off. I can't believe that a week ago, it looked great and was full of blooms.
    It was a gift. I would have never bought myself a rose bush. I am not a great gardener, but I really don't want to kill t his one like I did my geranium. (and many other plants including cacti, over the years)
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  4. #654
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    My pumpkin plants have me pretending to be a great gardener. Many of the leaves are close to 20" across, and there is a profusion of flowers, which are averaging about 6" across. I haven't seen any female flowers yet, but the male flowers are doing a good job of attracting bees, so I'm hoping for good pollination when the female flowers do come along.

    I think that the variety that I planted, Burpee's Hercules, has more to do with the plant size than anything I might have done, but I can still brag
    "The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination."
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  5. #655
    Best Buddies Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Not to rain on your parade, Newf, but if you haven't started seeing pumpkins yet, isn't it a little late now? Maybe you have a longer growing period than we do. We're already having overnight temps in the mid 40s.
    Count your blessings!

  6. #656
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    The traditional pumpkin-planting date for a Halloween harvest in my area is July 4th. I was a little late, but I'm hoping for the best. Our overnights are running mid 60's to mid 70's, and it's been unusually cool during the day, with highs in the low 80's.
    "The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination."
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  7. #657
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Hey, Newf, what is the difference between male and female flowers? Is that why I'm not getting tomatoes or cantaloupe or flowers? Maybe the seeds I'm planting don't have sexes?!

  8. #658
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    I don't know anything about cantaloupe except that I've never had any luck with them, and all I know about cukes is that my brothers and I used to chuck rotted cucumbers at each other

    As for telling the difference on pumpkin flowers: Male flowers have a straight stem, female flowers have a small bulge on their stems just below the petals. I think that there are some structural differences within the flower itself, but I don't remember off the top of my head just what those differences are, and I can't find my pumpkin book.
    "The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination."
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  9. #659
    Premium Member burntbrat's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Newfherder;3171198;
    The traditional pumpkin-planting date for a Halloween harvest in my area is July 4th. I was a little late, but I'm hoping for the best. Our overnights are running mid 60's to mid 70's, and it's been unusually cool during the day, with highs in the low 80's.
    Hey, you never know! I planted my tomatoes only a few weeks late (I had the seeds planted indoors in time, but transplanted them late) and I also made the stupid mistake of planting marigolds between my mater plants. Most of my plants were stunted or didn't grow, and then those that did got hit by the bugs that the marigolds attracted. But I did have one plant that took off, had lots of blooms but never any fruit until recently. I thought my growing season was a bust but I've had a couple of yummy tomatoes recently! And they weren't mealy either like you usually get from fall tomato plants.
    One of these days I'll stop being sensitive. Until then, I'll continue to be devastated on a daily basis. Life breaks my heart.

  10. #660
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by famita;3171208;
    Hey, Newf, what is the difference between male and female flowers? Is that why I'm not getting tomatoes or cantaloupe or flowers? Maybe the seeds I'm planting don't have sexes?!
    The plants aren't male or female, the individual flowers are, at least on your melons, and squash including pumpkins. The swelling on the female flower turns into the fruit. Tomatoes are self pollinating, meaning that each flower contains both sexes, and can pollinate itself. If you have all foliage and no fruit or blooms of any kind, the most likely problem is over fertilizing with nitrogen or Miracle Gro type fertilizers. look on the MG label and you will see that it states not to use it until the fruit is the size of a dime--or at least that advice used to be included. Too much of these things makes the plant put all its energy into getting bigger, not more productive. better luck next year! You could stiil conceivably get some 'maters this year if you stop feeding them now. If you are not fertilizing, I don't know what could be wrong, if the plant looks really healthy otherwise.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

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