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Thread: Gardening

  1. #581
    Premium Member burntbrat's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Those are great suggestions, Rattus. I should probably do the shower thing all the time anyway. I usually water my houseplants while waiting for the sink faucet to get hot for dishes.
    One of these days I'll stop being sensitive. Until then, I'll continue to be devastated on a daily basis. Life breaks my heart.

  2. #582
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3063585;
    Burntbrat, if you choose to give the garden a second shot and want to water, you can use grey water on your vegetables. If you use biodegradable dish soap you can use that, you can put a bucket under the tap while you run your shower water to warm it up, and you can use the water in the pot from steaming vegetables or cooking pasta. Also, it's a really good idea to invest in as many rain barrels as your house can accommodate.

    I wouldn't worry about the lawn - lawns always come back.
    I'd add to those suggestions, for any watering you can do with a hose it is well worth it to invest in a watering wand. It allows you to get the water right down at the based on each plant so that you're concentrating the water to the space where it's needed. You end up using less water, because you're not watering the dirt surrounding an area that does not have roots.

  3. #583
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    I am excited to report that after 7 years of first planting, my peony finally bloomed this year! Every one who mowed, went right over my budding plant when it had just budded, or trampled it when they walked through my yard, or vindictively mowed it down. I was so thrilled to have 2 blossoms this year, and hope it grows more next year!

  4. #584
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Gardening

    Congrats Famita!!! It's those small little victories that make gardening so much fun!

  5. #585
    MRD
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    Re: Gardening

    Well my herb garden is going GREAT! I've never had such success at gardening (usually I'm a dismal failure) but we've been enjoying fresh herbs for a few weeks now. I guess it doesn't hurt that most of what I planted is easy to grow and basically grows like weeds.

    And my sweetheart rose bush that I was given on Valentine's Day is finally coming back after I almost killed it. But sadly my indoor ivy plant didn't make it.

    I'm a very inconsistant gardener. I like a garden, but I'm not passionate about the work involved which is why I like the herbs. Very little work for much reward.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
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  6. #586
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3063585;
    I wouldn't worry about the lawn - lawns always come back.
    Actually, to me that's the only good part of a drought-- not having to mow during the very hottest part of the summer.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  7. #587
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb;3063794;
    Actually, to me that's the only good part of a drought-- not having to mow during the very hottest part of the summer.
    Too true. We have been getting rid of our lawn bit by bit over the years in the back, and dug the front entirely under and replaced it with a rock garden. Looks pretty, less work.

    Anyway, does anyone have any good suggestions for flowering shade-tolerant perennials(zone 6) that grow to a goodish size? I have some tiger lilies, some columbine and some sort of bee balm that does fantastically well, but everything else is of a fairly insignificant size (toad lilies, Labrador violets, etc), and I'm not overly fond of hostas. A couple of other things I gave a shot at (heuchera, astilbe and peonies [at the dappled edge of the shade]) aren't doing as well as they should and I really want to move them out front and replace them with something floral. And I hate, hate, hate impatiens, the one thing that everyone suggests.

    Help!
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  8. #588
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Gardening

    QueenB -- I'm just learning the joy of draught induced not cutting the grass each week, and I'm loving it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3063819;
    Too true. We have been getting rid of our lawn bit by bit over the years in the back, and dug the front entirely under and replaced it with a rock garden. Looks pretty, less work.

    Anyway, does anyone have any good suggestions for flowering shade-tolerant perennials(zone 6) that grow to a goodish size? I have some tiger lilies, some columbine and some sort of bee balm that does fantastically well, but everything else is of a fairly insignificant size (toad lilies, Labrador violets, etc), and I'm not overly fond of hostas. A couple of other things I gave a shot at (heuchera, astilbe and peonies [at the dappled edge of the shade]) aren't doing as well as they should and I really want to move them out front and replace them with something floral. And I hate, hate, hate impatiens, the one thing that everyone suggests.

    Help!
    Fox Glove is another thing that grows well in the shade. Of course, the problem with those plus fox glove is that the assortment is primarily spring bloomers, which leaves you high and dry the rest of the Summer. Black eyed Susans and Conflowers are typically sun plants, but both are so hearty that they grow pretty well in shade too. AND, they're Summer bloomers which will balance out your color throughout the season.

  9. #589
    Premium Member burntbrat's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3063819;
    Too true. We have been getting rid of our lawn bit by bit over the years in the back, and dug the front entirely under and replaced it with a rock garden. Looks pretty, less work.

    Anyway, does anyone have any good suggestions for flowering shade-tolerant perennials(zone 6) that grow to a goodish size? I have some tiger lilies, some columbine and some sort of bee balm that does fantastically well, but everything else is of a fairly insignificant size (toad lilies, Labrador violets, etc), and I'm not overly fond of hostas. A couple of other things I gave a shot at (heuchera, astilbe and peonies [at the dappled edge of the shade]) aren't doing as well as they should and I really want to move them out front and replace them with something floral. And I hate, hate, hate impatiens, the one thing that everyone suggests.

    Help!
    I have some phlox that does really well in the shade and the flowers are lovely. Every year since I planted them they've multiplied a bit and they come back stronger. They bloom for me in the summer and last until early fall.
    One of these days I'll stop being sensitive. Until then, I'll continue to be devastated on a daily basis. Life breaks my heart.

  10. #590
    Premium Member canuckinchile's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    I'll also benefit from those suggestions as I have a lot of shade in the back. Question: it tends to be quite damp in the back. I know Astilbe's like that, but what about Black-eyed Susans? I really love them but I don't know if they would survive the water that accumulates after the snow melt in the Spring. The lot slopes downward and even the neighbours HUGE Weeping Willow can't suck up all the water

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