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Thread: Gardening

  1. #441
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    Re: Gardening

    Burntrat, your post about possibly having a honey bees in your house eaves reminded me of something I saw a while back, in a park forest at Sliding Rock, NC- the bathhouse at that attraction. The bathhouse was closed to users because the eaves of the entire end of the building was ripped off and on the ground, and on top of the splintered lumber was an enormous mass of honeycomb and gallons and gallons and gallons of honey oozing over it all. I dont know whether the sheer weight of all the honey and comb tore the eaves off the building or if park workers did it to get the bees out of there (there were no bees around). Anyway, I looked this up and found a couple of articles you may be interested in:
    Bee hive in a house
    Honey Bees in House Walls, HYG-2079-97

    Both of those articles address the problem of removing bees and their hives/honey from the walls of homes.

    you will find lots more if you type in 'unwanted honey bee hives in buildings' and similar search terms. There are some pics here:

    Honey Bee Removals
    Last edited by onewally; 10-28-2007 at 08:44 AM.

  2. #442
    Go Donny! Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    I could take this one to "What creeps you out?" - the idea of tons of honey inside your walls (attracting ants????). I wonder if it's good insulation?
    Count your blessings!

  3. #443
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    What an odd coincidence--I never watch Nature on PBS, but did tonight. It was about honey bees and some mysterious problem that is wiping out whole colonies. DEFINITELY have the bees moved, not exterminated! I learned that nearly 75% of all plants rely on bees for pollination. That's pretty significant
    "The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination."
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  4. #444
    Premium Member burntbrat's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    They're definitely honey bees. We've taken pictures of them flying in and out of their little hive. It's not too big yet but I am concerned now reading about the posts of honey combs in walls. Right now they're just under the eave in a rain gutter. My husband thinks we should wait until spring and see if the winter and rains make them move or kill them. Then we'll call someone to get the hive moved somewhere safe. I'm disappointed that I can't have a honey bee hive on the side of my house
    One of these days I'll stop being sensitive. Until then, I'll continue to be devastated on a daily basis. Life breaks my heart.

  5. #445
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    Re: Gardening

    I dont mean to be a killjoy, but I personally couldnt sleep at night if I thought there were honeybees building a hive in my house walls.

    From Honey Bees in House Walls, HYG-2079-97 .......remove the nest if at all possible, without causing excessive structural damage. Destroy the comb and honey, especially if they were treated with insecticide. If the nest is not removed, the wax cells may melt or be riddled by wax moths and leak honey. Excess honey may seep through interior walls and ceilings, leaving permanent stains.
    Wax combs near the inside walls of a chimney are fire hazards. The comb and its contents may melt when exposed to hot summer temperatures without bees to keep it cool, especially in walls facing the south.

    After a dead colony has been removed and the structural damage caused in removing the colony has been repaired, clean the area thoroughly with soap and hot water. Paint and carefully plug all entrances through which the other possible bee swarms might enter. Odors left by the killed colony can linger for a long time and attract other swarming bees.

    Pest control companies may be contacted to destroy the bees if needed. Although killing adult bees is usually fairly easy, removal of the comb and honey can be very difficult. It might be useful to have a beekeeper and carpenter or beekeeper with carpenter abilities present to assist. Bees from other colonies can also be a nuisance around the home as long as honey remains to be robbed from the killed colony. Scavenging insects, such as carpet beetles, wax moths, ants, or flies, are also attracted to killed bee colonies.
    I hate the idea of killing them. Calling a beekeeper to come and get them would be a nice thing to do, and I dont think there is any charge.

  6. #446
    Premium Member burntbrat's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    So after all of your suggestions and bubble-bursting, I called the best beekeeper in Houston. He confirmed that I do indeed have honey bees. He also crushed me by saying they have been there for some time because they're all set up and preparing for the winter. On the plus side, they're beautiful, healthy bees and they're very active. Bad news for my walls, though. I learned so much about bees while talking to him. He really loves what he does and LOVES to talk about it. I know more about bees that I ever thought I would, and they're fascinating. Tomorrow morning he's coming to rid my house of the bees and take all the workers back to his farm and re-queen them with a European lady who is free from diseases. So I'm glad that they won't all have to die. My queen has to be destroyed, though, because they don't know what diseases she carries and whether or not she's of the African variety. And it is NOT free (curses), I have to pay for the "extermination". I'm sad that I won't have a beautiful garden like the beekeeper (freakin' braggart) but I'm glad that I can save most of them. They really are so quiet and gentle (I've watched them tons since they were discovered) that I'll be sad to see my little National Geographic experience leave. If I can take some pictures, I will. You all probably aren't as intersted, but it's exciting stuff around here
    One of these days I'll stop being sensitive. Until then, I'll continue to be devastated on a daily basis. Life breaks my heart.

  7. #447
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    burntbrat, I find this kind of stuff very interesting, more so than a lot of what passes for entertainment nowadays ! Then again, I spent two whole days looking for rocks last week... Keep us posted.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  8. #448
    Go Donny! Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb;2645462;
    Then again, I spent two whole days looking for rocks last week... Keep us posted.
    Hahahahaha! you crack me up. Do you at least get to keep the tons of honey in your walls if they find any? Go get those gigantic ziploc bags for storing soccer balls, etc. just in case
    Count your blessings!

  9. #449
    Premium Member burntbrat's Avatar
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    Re: Gardening

    Wow. Wow is all I have to say. We had a very large hive. They were so quiet though, if it wasn't for my neighbors who knows when I would've discovered them. The beekeeper got tons of wax and about a gallon of honey. He's going to process some and bring it back tonight. I only asked for a small jar though. It would take decades for us to eat a gallon! Here's a creepy pic:

    One of these days I'll stop being sensitive. Until then, I'll continue to be devastated on a daily basis. Life breaks my heart.

  10. #450
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    Re: Gardening

    Can you describe what we're seeing in the picture burntbrat? How big is that hole?

    We had to spray under our siding a few weeks ago because a lot of yellow jackets had taken up residence. Fortunately the few that made it into the house were dehydrated and sluggish. No one was stung.
    "Fish are friends, not food, but everything else is fair game." ~ Pating, Survivor Cagayan Pool

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