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Thread: Gardening

  1. #11
    FORTfruity applesauce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariner View Post
    You know applesauce, other than the slug issue, tomatoes grow really well in Portland.
    Mariner, there's nothing I would love more than to move up to Portland. *sigh* I think we'll be down here in the Bay Area at least 5 more years now that my husband took a new job. I do love the Bay Area so I can't complain...except for the cost of living.

    CantGetNuf, thanks for the info on the squash. I'm putting it on my list!

  2. #12
    An innocent bystander nlmcp's Avatar
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    I'm trying to decide if I want to go for a little vegtable garden this year or keep working on the flowers. I always hit this mid summer lag where the weeding gets out of hand on me.

    I'm watching to see what pops up from all the bulbs I planted in the fall. I do have a few crocus coming up.

    Got to decide about a tree for the back yard. Maybe two, my little one died.
    I could go east, I could go west, it was all up to me to decide. Just then I saw a young hawk flyin' and my soul began to rise. ~Bob Seger

  3. #13
    Here's your sign JAFO'S PRINCESS's Avatar
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    Rattus- I live in Indiana- land of dry soil. We plant really healthy, robust flowers and tomatoes. Anything hearty like pansies or mums would probably work. Look for stuff that loves the sun and usally it can handle little water. I am going to surround my camper with potted plants and start a few flower beds! Oh, and a "corn plant" will grow anywhere. I had one for my pet iguana and it got HUGE.
    I might as well work. I'm in a bad mood anyway.
    "I like to base my help on how happy you expect to be." Dogbert's tech support.

  4. #14
    Me and my shadow Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Rattus-I have the same conditions and periwinkle (groundcover) does well as does wild bleeding heart. Newfherder- rhubarb shouldn't be that hard to grow. Try to find somebody who already has it rather than buy it at a store. It needs to be divided periodically and most gardners are happy to share. The key with rhubarb is cow manure. As soon as it starts coming up, dress the ground with it and dig it in a little. When I pick rhubarb, I rip off the huge, poisonous leaves and lay them around the plants to discourage weeds. I have a gooseberry bush divided from my grandmother's decades ago and moved twice. Does anyone else here have gooseberries? I just love to eat them - not bake with them.
    Count your blessings!

  5. #15
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gutmutter View Post
    Rattus-I have the same conditions and periwinkle (groundcover) does well as does wild bleeding heart..
    Thanks, Gutmutter. I will give periwinkle a try. If I can find wild bleeding heart I would like to give that a go too (I love bleeding hearts, foliage and flower), but I'm not too optimistic about that right now.
    Does anyone else here have gooseberries? I just love to eat them - not bake with them.
    We had a gooseberry bush at our last house. We planted it at the back of the yard which had the same sort of conditions we are now dealing with, except for the shade. It grew quickly and did extremely well without any sort of assistance from us and provided a fairly healthy crop every year. I would have to say it was one of the most painless plants I have ever had the pleasure of dealing with.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  6. #16
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gutmutter View Post
    Newfherder- rhubarb shouldn't be that hard to grow. Try to find somebody who already has it rather than buy it at a store. It needs to be divided periodically and most gardners are happy to share. The key with rhubarb is cow manure. As soon as it starts coming up, dress the ground with it and dig it in a little. When I pick rhubarb, I rip off the huge, poisonous leaves and lay them around the plants to discourage weeds.
    You wouldn't think it would be difficult, but I've had problems with a lot of things that SHOULD be easy. Raspberries died out within a year; asparagus died out even faster. It even took seven years before I was able to grow a single pumpkin.

    I think the biggest problem that I have with gardening is that I am living on a former wheat field, and the soil is very tired. Years of anhydrous ammonia applications killed off most of the beneficial insects and earthworms. I've been more aggressive in the past few years with adding soil amendments, and it is starting to pay off--last year's pumpkins absolutely delighted my ex-wife's three-year-old twins.

    Another BIG help is drip irrigation for the garden. Kansas is famous for its wind (and damn little else ) so overhead sprinklers tend to blow water everywhere except the garden, and a lot of it evaporates before it hits the ground. With the drip irrigation, which is very easy to install (it hooks up to my garden hose), I can give plants a fighting chance. Maybe there is hope for some "exotics" like rhubarb
    "The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination."
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  7. #17
    FORT Fogey veejer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gutmutter View Post
    I'm the world's best gardener in the spring. I like to dig by hand, plant, etc. but I hate to weed. And here in MA we get these horrid things called black flies that make it miserable to be outside in the month of May, and the summer is too hot to go digging around. I usually have to treasure hunt for tomatoes. I do get good beans and peas. Rhubarb is wonderful. Not much work required there. I get a good grape and blackberry harvest with little to no work investment. I do love to go dig in the dirt in the spring, though.
    Gutmutter,I do best in the spring, too. I love to start my tomatoes from seed. I love to grow beans, but have had trouble with Mexican Bean Beetles getting more than I do.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus View Post
    I'm hoping that someone, anyone, could pass along the names of some plant life, preferably ground cover, that will do well in dry, rocky soil, in the shade, zone 5-6. I'm starting a new yard from scratch (the previous owners had an above ground pool that essentially destroyed everything), and I tried a couple of things in that area last summer,but nothing seems to survive. Also, I'm trying to xeriscape as much as possible, so anything that will survive without being watered regularly would be ideal. HELP!
    Rattus, I'm in northwest Ohio, also zone 5/6. I have myrtle growing in an area that gets only early morning sun, then shade for the rest of the day, but it does get some water. I don't know how it would do without being watered fairly regularly.

    Funny story about the myrtle. When we moved here in May 2000, the neighbor lady came over and explained what perennials were planted where. Apparently the previous owner didn't know anything about plants and the neighbor lady had shared some advice and divided perennials for her. However, she couldn't convince her not to pull out the myrtle that was growing in this shady spot between the front walk and the wall of the garage. It was also growing up the bricks on the wall, which she didn't like. She pulled out all the myrtle, despite being told that you can never get rid of myrtle, and planted a few plants of pachysandra. When we arrived the pachysandra were few and far between and the myrtle was fighting back. I decided to help the myrtle "win" and pulled the pachysandra whenever I spotted it. Last spring, 2005, was the first with no pachysandra and the myrtle has covered the entire area. I trim it a 3-4 times a year to keep it off of the walk and front steps. I also keep it down on the wall to 12-18 inches. It probably takes me 60-90 minutes a year to tend to the myrtle now.

    applesauce, this link lists a bunch of vegetables that can be grown in containers and it shows what size containers to use.

    http://www.gardenguides.com/TipsandT...container2.htm

  8. #18
    Cy Young 2010 Mariner's Avatar
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    I have a little yard even though I have a townhouse. We have all of three units so it's a little funny when we have a condo association meeting but that's another story. My gardening secret is to invite my mother who loves to garden up every month or so during the spring and summer. She prunes and weeds and helps me plant annuals.
    "I miss Darva Conger." - Phonegrrrl

  9. #19
    Being VIP Yardgnome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariner View Post
    My gardening secret is to invite my mother who loves to garden up every month or so during the spring and summer. She prunes and weeds and helps me plant annuals.
    I thought I was the only one who had that gardening secret. Last year my mom came and helped me clean out all the beds and plant everything. She even came back a couple of times throughout the summer to help with weeding and care. Gotta love your mom!

  10. #20
    Cy Young 2010 Mariner's Avatar
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    Moms rock. Well except when they are being complete pains in the ass. I know pretty much nothing about plants. We go to the local garden store, and she babbles on about the Latin names of plants. I try to act like I have some idea what she's talking about. I have these three huge rhododendrons in my yard. They basically need to get whacked back every fall to keep them from taking over the entire yard. To me, it's drudgery. To her, it's fun.
    "I miss Darva Conger." - Phonegrrrl

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