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Thread: get a job advice?

  1. #1
    giz
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    get a job advice?

    Hi there,
    my name is Giz, and I'm an underemployed person. Seriously though, I need (versus want, actually quite happy to stay at home, bake things, read books and pick up kids after school) to get a job. The schools where we live are dire, so the kids are in private school (tried public, didn't work). We go camping for 2 days a year and live in a teeny tiny house. So I sort of need a job. Trouble is, I've been applying for things I'm well-qualified for, and not even getting interviews. Is this because I've been home for 10 years (taking care of kids)? Now I'm thinking of applying for a job at the kids' school. Really nice people, decent pay, great benefits, but the job is a little out of my league. Only slightly. Should I puff resume? I'm a quick learner. It requires some Mac experience, and I've got about ten to 14 days to pick that up. Aside from that, I know the job.

    Also, I don't want to work full-time. Is it totally off-putting to ask if they would be open to a job-share? I really need some time to myself in the day, and want to be there to pick the kids up after school, don't want them in daycare for a couple of hours.

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    CCL
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    Hey giz,
    I don't think it is wrong to "puff up" your resume - you should always sell your best points & cast less light on any distracting/negative elements. As long as you are not being untruthful.
    It is probably true that some people are automatically passing because of your being out of the workforce for ten years. Which sucks, but is most likely true. Maybe you could put a line about that in your cover letter? Make it a selling point about all you learned and did.
    It is not unreasonable to ask if a job could be part-time or job-share. You should just make sure to note that upfront (I wouldn't do it in the resume but, rather, at the interview stage).
    Anyways, I'm sure more people have (better) advice than me. But I wish you lots of luck and fortune. You're a great person and I'm sure things will work out for you.
    If you type "google" into google you can break the internet.

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    FORT Regular MaxxFisher's Avatar
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    I work in the classifieds department of a newspaper, so I see a lot of employment ands and my share of resumes.
    Puff up the resume, but don't lie, just be creative with your wording.
    Always have a cover letter with your resume
    You don't know that the job is out of your league. You would be surprised at how many companies "puff up" their job ads to get the most people applying.
    Send out as many resumes as you can, they can either ignore it, say no orcall you in for an interview.
    I have gotten every job I have interviewed for and the only advice I give is to act like you are going to the principal's office. Be friendly & professional, follow their lead, if they want to make the intierview more conversational let them. And most importantly know when to shut up. People talk themselves right out of a job a lot.

    Well I hope that helped

  4. #4
    giz
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    Thanks so much for your advice, CCL and MaxxF. A lot of the jobs I've been applying for do not exist as such. Someone is already doing the job, they just have to post it due to worksite regulations. The general public doesn't know this, but often Personel has confessed to me tha this is the case (our university is a particularly bad one for this). I'm feeling a confidence boost now, so thanks. I definetely need one, especially after being out of the job market for ten years! As of half an hour ago, I have the beginnings of a job. I've talked my way into teaching cooking at the community centre! It's only a few classes, and I'd need to do this 10 months of the year, to make what I'm aiming for, but it's a start. I'm pretty excited too, as I love cooking and mentoring, so I think it's a really good fit. Still need something regular, but this is good. (wish it was a bigger city, then I could do it full-time).

    And you're right Maxx, I am a prime candidate for talking my way out of a job. Nerves get to me, and I babble. It never occurred to me that they might be puffing at their end (although I've told my husband as much before, just didn't realise it applies to jobs I want too). And if I get as far as the interview, I'll definetely ask about job-sharing. I'd miss the kids too much, even if they do drive me crazy. (I also think I'd be shattered at working full-time then coming home to a second shift of cooking/cleaning here. Don't know how everyone else does it!)
    Last edited by giz; 09-13-2005 at 03:58 PM.

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    CCL
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    Teaching cooking should be fun. Hope it's good, giz.
    If you type "google" into google you can break the internet.

  6. #6
    Up too late... Chickngirl's Avatar
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    There are people who want people with your experience- you can handle stress and multi-task, and your mature with experience. Sell those points, not the "unemployed" for 10 years.
    I was lucky to actually find a part-time job-share. My job isn't all that great, but it is very flexible, and I can even take my kids to work. I think it is the benefit of working for a very-small, woman-owned business.
    Good luck!
    "The older you get, the more rules they are going to try and get you to follow. You just gotta keep on livin', man. L-I-V-I-N." Wooderson, "Dazed & Confused"

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    I work for an employment agency as a recruitment consultant. Employers ring me to find them a suitable employee. I also have clients that I have to try and sell to employers as suitable employees. Resumes are the first point of contact with the employer so they need to stand out. Pad them by all means but dont over do it. Keep them short and to the point making sure they address the criteria of the position advertised, generally try to keep it to no more than two pages, employers dont have alot of time in some cases so make sure the points you want to get across are the first thing they see. Get them hooked, so they want to read the rest. Just one last one, imagine you are competing with alot of other people so make sure your resume stands out. Dont use anymore than two fonts, a bold fancy one for your name and headings and a plain easy to read one for the details, pick up a piece of paper, see how your eyes immediately go to the left of the page so make sure this is where all the important stuff is located. Include the time you have been at home in the work history and list all the skills you have obtained by doing this, such as time management, menu planning, budgetting, domestic accounting. I could go on forever, resumes are my speciality, but hopefully i have given you some hints you have not heard before.
    Good Luck

  8. #8
    Mixing Old Fashioneds PhoneGrrrl's Avatar
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    Does anyone have any advice on cover letters? I've got the resume down--no problem there. But I always feel my cover letters are a bit on the crap side. I'm very frustrated with my job, and there've been a couple of jobs I've been interested in, but I get stuck at that cover letter. I hate to restate what is in the resume--it's short & to the point enough that I don't want to insult the prospective employer. But I feel weird about the cover letter--I don't want to say what I really feel: give me an interview so I can see if you're offered job is less sucky than the one I have. I'm open to any/all suggestions.

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    FORT Fogey snoopy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoneGrrrl
    Does anyone have any advice on cover letters? I've got the resume down--no problem there. But I always feel my cover letters are a bit on the crap side. I'm very frustrated with my job, and there've been a couple of jobs I've been interested in, but I get stuck at that cover letter. I hate to restate what is in the resume--it's short & to the point enough that I don't want to insult the prospective employer. But I feel weird about the cover letter--I don't want to say what I really feel: give me an interview so I can see if you're offered job is less sucky than the one I have. I'm open to any/all suggestions.

    I went from 19k a year to 40k a year by padding my resume a bit, but the funny part is that the 19k employer gave me the glowing reference that got me the good job. 40k probably is nothing where you are, but in SC, it means I am flush! I have found in 30 years of working, that it is ALL about who you know.... network your a** off, and you will get the job of your life. It really helps to know people, even if you meet them in a social situation.
    Go Tigers!

  10. #10
    giz
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    Thanks again guys. You're right, I should see my time at home as experience in its own right. The job I'm aiming for is in a school, so certainly learning how to talk to kids would prove beneficial. And Lucynda, thanks for the professional advice. Some of that is definately new to me. The job closes next week. I'll let you know if anything good happens.

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