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Thread: get a job advice?

  1. #21
    giz
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    I guess too, in the back of my mind, I'm thinking that if I have qualifications and still can't get interviewed, then I'm perfectly justified in throwing in the towel and sticking to my collage of jobs, and giving up on a career. Alternately it might, as you said, get me somewhere! Either way, one of the courses will be interesting (the other's pretty dry), and for $70 each I can't complain. After all these years at home I'm not too keen on being someone's underling (also my husband is tres bossy, so I have pretty much enough confrontation in my life). Unless the work site is great, I'm kind of second guessing having a normal job (and then I think about benefits and paid holidays, and I'm all confused again).

  2. #22
    giz
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    I'm exhausted now! Yesterday I went to one work site I was interested in (Uni library) and schmoozed with the boss (about how to advance to the interview stage). Found out hundreds of people applied for "my job", so it was no wonder I didn't get called. Also they have to interview people already in the union, even if they are as far removed from the library as, say, dishwashers. They get priority. Still, at least now she has a face to put to the resume. Today I went and schmoozed with the librarian at my kids' school. She was really nice, there hasn't been a ton of interest in that job (but all it takes is a couple of people more qualified), and now she knows me, so that's good. She kept throwing acronyms at me that I didn't know though. Not sure I'm interested in a learning curve. I'd maybe rather work in a larger site, where no-one would notice me getting up to speed. Ideally something I already know how to do, that I could do whilst day-dreaming (like shelving books). If all this schmoozing doesn't help, my new cunning plan is to register as a student, get a job at the university (they try to place as many students as possible) and then try for internal jobs. I did this before, (after my degree and before we had kids) and it was quite successful. The things you have to do to get a job nowadays! I am so envious of people 10 years older than me, who seemed tohave been allowed to train on the job.

  3. #23
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    You schmoozer, you. It can be discouraging - the whole internal candidate pool, learning acronyms etc. I'm glad to see you are keeping at it.
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  4. #24
    giz
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    Yeah, it's funny, but in the last 6 weeks of applying for jobs, the only ones I've gotten to the testing stage for were jobs where my good friend knew the woman hiring. (Messed up my typing, so didn't get through). Those jobs were ones I wasn't particularly qualified for. Jobs I am qualified for, I don't even get past Personnel. It's aggravating. I'm all for a union work-site (I used to be a shop steward), but it is frustrating when it's working against you. I just want a well-paying, non-demanding, positive work-site, union job with benefits. That's not too much to ask is it?

    Thanks for your support CCL, I'm looking forward to this job-hunting being over and moving on to whinging about my job, you know the natural evolutionary process. (Similar in my experience to the whole "I'm lonely, I sure want a boyfriend.....My boyfriend sucks, I sure wish I was single again" song and dance.

  5. #25
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    An Employer's Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by giz
    Should I puff resume?
    Quote Originally Posted by CCL
    I don't think it is wrong to "puff up" your resume - you should always sell your best points & cast less light on any distracting/negative elements.
    Quote Originally Posted by MaxxFisher
    Puff up the resume, but don't lie, just be creative with your wording.
    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy
    I went from 19k a year to 40k a year by padding my resume a bit. . . .
    Quote Originally Posted by giz
    The padding I was referring to was mostly claiming I have Mac experience when I don't.
    ___________________________

    I'm "old-fashioned," I guess, but I have absolutely no respect for anyone who would "puff up" or "pad" a resume -- claiming one has experience that one does not have is, in fact, lying, and I think it's a reprehensible behavior.

    I am an administrator at a small office, and the resumes we get from applicants go through me first.

    A little lying goes a long, long way in the eyes of an employer. WHY DO SO MANY PEOPLE THINK IT'S OKAY TO LIE TO US EMPLOYERS???

    I want to hire good people, honest people, and my feeling (which I know exists among my peers) is that if people will lie at the beginning of the job-seeking process, they're just as likely to lie once they're a part of our organization. WE DON'T WANT DISHONEST PEOPLE. We want people with the skills we need and good, solid characters.

    I do take time to scrutinize the resumes for inconsistencies, because there are a lot of good, high-quality applicants out there who ARE honest and don't lie, and I want my pool of applicants to consist of those people, and only those people.

    I have no respect for anyone who'll "puff up" or "pad" a resume because all they're doing, when they do that, is lying and being deceitful. I don't want anyone who'd do that working in my organization.

    My most recent experience with this just occurred this past week.

    My office is in need of some administrative support staff so we have contacted a few placement agencies and asked them to screen some candidates for us.

    We've also advertised on Cragislist.com, where people can apply for the position and we, the employer, can use an "anonymous" e-mail address so that the applicants don't know the name of the company to which they're applying.

    Last week I received an e-mail and resume from someone who worked in our office as a temp only a year and a half ago. She wanted a full-time job with us then but she was not too competent so we didn't offer one to her. We simply let her go when her term as a temp with us expired. (That's a great thing about using temps.)

    Here we are, a year and a half later, and this same woman applied for our current opening via the anonymous e-mail address through Craigslist.

    Guess what? Her resume is full of lies and I know that it is because not only was she working FOR US during a period of time when she was allegedly working at her most recent employer, but the most recent employer she named doesn't even exist!!!

    She listed a made-up company and said she's worked there from 2000-2005.

    I will call this applicant next week and tell her that she won't get an interview, and I'll call her on the false information she provided in her resume.

    I HATE LYING. Lying wastes our time and leads to us hiring people who aren't qualified for the positions that we need filled. PLEASE DON'T LIE.

    I hate lying, as much as I hate cheating in silly Internet games (but I'll save that rant for another time).

    Don't lie on your resumes, you guys. If people do choose to lie, then I sincerely hope they get caught.

  6. #26
    giz
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    Pom, I am very tired now after reading that. So, basically what you're trying to say is, you don't like liars? Well, you see, being born in the year of the Rabbit, we see things a little differently over here in the lettuce patch. We see it as smoothing things over, greasing the wheels of social interaction. I guess I'm not quite as uncomfortable with lying, so long as no-one gets hurt. (If I was a nurse who claimed to have ICU experience, when in fact I didn't for example, this would be an unqualified bad thing). As I said above, my "padding" would take the form of claiming to have Mac experience when I don't, based on everyone telling me that I could become proficient within a week as I know PC's pretty well, and the differences are not so great that I couldn't pick them up. (I wouldn't add jobs that don't exist or change dates of employment. I might get caught doing that!)

    If I don't do this, I won't get interviewed, and if I do, (and by some miracle got offered the job) I could learn before the job starts. So perhaps it wasn't quite as bad as you thought. On the other hand, I have a feeling your tolerance level for liars is way below mine, so it might still make you see red. I think watching the whole Watergate summer when I was 9 has seriously affected my expectations of people's behaviour. I've lowered the bar for everyone, myself included. (I think if I was 100% straight, I'd probably still be serving fish and chips like I was when I was in high school).
    Last edited by giz; 09-25-2005 at 04:36 PM.

  7. #27
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    Pom, when I put "puff up" I didn't mean lie - I just meant putting a positive spin on things, shining and buffing the good stuff and downplaying the "bad". That's what I wrote, actually, as shown in the quote you use:
    Originally Posted by CCL
    I don't think it is wrong to "puff up" your resume - you should always sell your best points & cast less light on any distracting/negative elements.
    I kind of pity the girl who lied in her resume. Yes, it is absolutely wrong to list a place you did not work for as some place you worked at 5 years. That is easy enough for employers to check. And I don't think you should hire her. But it is hard being without a job. Maybe she thinks if she could get a foot in the door then she could prove herself. I'm thinking of one of the women in my organization. When she was hired she didn't have much experience and she had left her last job on bad terms. We hired her because we knew her personally (so we gave her a chance). And, now, she is the best & most capable person in our office. If we had just been hiring off of a warts-and-all resume we probably would never have hired her. And that would have been our loss. I think the resume is just the thing to get you in the door (and, let me stress again, I don't think you should blatantly lie on it; just sell yourself). Then once you get to the interview stage an employer can usually tell straight away when someone is an honest shooter or if they are full of crap or what they will add to an organization.

    Now, I'm sad because I think Pom hates me.
    Last edited by CCL; 09-25-2005 at 07:55 PM.
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  8. #28
    giz
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    For example, Pom, I could put on my resume that I worked in the popcorn bar at the Uni cinema and I could put that I also worked in the office helping with the festival. I leave the popcorn bar off, because it doesn't look as skilled (read high-paying) as the office job. I could stress the fact that in the bookstore jobs I've had I did cash work. But that doesn't normally impress people, so I don't put it in. I emphasize that I met with agents, which I did. The Mac thing is puffing, but I wouldn't put it in, if I didn't think I could figure it out Before the job started. Otherwise I'd look a damn fool. Does this clear things up any?

  9. #29
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    This reminds me of a HILARIOUS episode of Friends when Joey lied on his resume and said he knew French. Then he got hired, and had to learn French and Phoebe tried to teach him but he was just HORRIBLE at it!

    I think all in all... it's just easier to not lie about your skills. Because if something does happen where they find out that you really don't know how to work Excel or something in that matter, then they're going to question what else you lied about, and then they're never going to look at you the same way. So for the rest of the time that you're working with them, they're always going to second guess you. Plus you're just wasting your time cause if you do go on to another job, and put them as a reference, they're probably gonna mention something about how you "fibbed" on the resume.

    I think if you don't have the skills that you need for that job, look for another job or learn those skills and then apply for the job. It's not that hard, and if you're not willing to work to learn those skills, then you probably don't deserve the job anyways.

    Now I think it's all in the wording of things. Instead of "worked in customer service", "Assisted customers in resolving issues" sounds alot better, and you're still telling the truth

  10. #30
    giz
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    Good points Callie. The reason I'd consider saying I know Macs in advance of learning, is that this job is at a small workplace, so likely won't come up again for a long time. I am upgrading my skills bigtime, am taking 20 hours per week of course work starting in January. (Can't start sooner as courses not offered til then). So it's a bit of a rock and a hard place you see. I did go in and see the people at the job I'm interested in and told them I don't know X, which you want, but am going to learn X in January, and in the meantime could do W,Y and Z really well. So they know that, if they knew I don't know Mac Internet or Windows it would be adios.

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