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Thread: Home improvement hell

  1. #181
    MRD
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricketeen;2287920;
    A couple of winters ago, our power went out for three days and I needed my hot beverages. I was afraid the first time I did it too, but desperate times call for desperate measures. The trick that helped me was to have the lighter's flame right there when I turned on the gas.

    Myrosiedog, what makes it difficult? Oh, duh - it just came to me - removing the dried adhesive/mortar/grout from the subfloor? My husband thinks we can just lay 1/8" plywood on top and put the vinyl floor on top of that. I bet if we don't take up the mortar, it would be too uneven of a surface for the plywood, huh? Hmmm.... I wonder if there is cement backerboard under it that we could remove and then lay the plywood. Home Improvement Hell is a good name for this thread. If anything can go wrong or complicate a project, it will.
    You are going to have to remove the tile. Laying plywood on top and then vinyl is going to be hard. The plywood needs to be attached to something and its hard to attach it to the tile.
    Removing it is not hard, but its work, you have to scrape the tile and morter and grout off. But in the long run, better to get rid of the tile and do the floor right. It will last longer. There are tools you can rent. You break a tile with a hammer into pieces and once you get that broken and up, then you use the "tile remover tool" (technical term. ) to pry up the other tiles. (its like getting the first brownie out of the pan.
    The first one is hard, but once its out, then the spatula can easily get to the rest of the brownies to lift them out. ) It really isn't complicated, but you do have to put your back into it. Usually the tiles will pop right up, then scrape the morter off and lay the new floor.
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  2. #182
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
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    I knew we'd have to remove the tile, but not the mortar. He thinks we can put the plywood on top of the mortar, but it's beginning to dawn on me that we need to scrape it off or the surface for the plywood will be uneven. The old tile is starting to look better and better .
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough." - Mario Andretti

  3. #183
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricketeen;2287976;
    I knew we'd have to remove the tile, but not the mortar. He thinks we can put the plywood on top of the mortar, but it's beginning to dawn on me that we need to scrape it off or the surface for the plywood will be uneven. The old tile is starting to look better and better .
    Once you get the tiles off, you could rent a floor sander for a couple of hours. It makes a hell of a dusty mess, though, so if you do, make sure you hang plastic drop cloths in all the doors and wear a mask. It's worth it to get the stuff off in less than a day.

    Now my question: does anyone know anything about sandblasting brick? We're debating on whether or not to sandblast the front of our house once we pull down the closed in porch. We've looked into doing it ourselves, but the main trouble with that is the disposal of the sand as it qualifies as hazardous waste and we couldn't just use it for keeping down weeds under the walkway. I don't know if it's insanely expensive or if the results would be worth the expense - does it actually blast ALL the paint off of brick, or does it leave traces?
    Last edited by Rattus; 03-20-2007 at 12:18 PM.
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  4. #184
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoneGrrrl;2287636;
    ... Apparently the geniuses who "modernized" it added some kind of wack-a-do (<--- professional plumber lingo)
    LOL. My previous owner was a wack-a-do self-contractor. Messed up on everything he touched. Still discovering his projects.

    myrosiedog: Love the comparison about taking out tiles to baking brownies! I hate the floor tile in my bathroom, but in no way am I prepared to do the work required.

    Rattus: I don't know much about sandblasting brick. Could someone at Home Depot or a sandblasting place answer your question?

    dagwood: I've heard both sides of the flattop stove issue. Some people love it. Some don't. And they really don't offer a try-before-you-buy kinda plan. I hope you like whatever you eventually get.
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  5. #185
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskitty;2288415;
    Rattus: I don't know much about sandblasting brick. Could someone at Home Depot or a sandblasting place answer your question?
    I talked to a guy at the equipment rental place who was so discouraging about the reality of doing it ourselves that I had to think twice (or more) about it. If the person who will make money out of you doing something tries to talk you out of doing that something, there will likely be trouble. I was hoping that some kindly FORTer had undergone the process, either doing it themselves or paying to have it done, and could tell me whether the huge and costly pain in the butt was worth it or not. I'm currently leaning towards not, but that means the siding we put up can't be a nice natural wood, it will have to be coloured and the brick painted to match (I'm leaning toward blue/grey with midnight blue trim).
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  6. #186
    MRD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;2288433;
    I talked to a guy at the equipment rental place who was so discouraging about the reality of doing it ourselves that I had to think twice (or more) about it. If the person who will make money out of you doing something tries to talk you out of doing that something, there will likely be trouble. I was hoping that some kindly FORTer had undergone the process, either doing it themselves or paying to have it done, and could tell me whether the huge and costly pain in the butt was worth it or not. I'm currently leaning towards not, but that means the siding we put up can't be a nice natural wood, it will have to be coloured and the brick painted to match (I'm leaning toward blue/grey with midnight blue trim).
    We've never tackled sandblasting brick, but my husband did sandblast some metal chairs and said he'd NEVER sandblast again and this was just 2 chairs. He said it is impossible NOT to have sand get everywhere and that included in his clothes and hair, etc. He said this was something he'd pay someone to do and when my husband says that, then I know it can't be good.
    Ask the guy that does the sandblasting if he has a list of clients. You may be able to see the end result of their brickwork and then decide.
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  7. #187
    Mixing Old Fashioneds PhoneGrrrl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;2287963;
    You are going to have to remove the tile. Laying plywood on top and then vinyl is going to be hard. The plywood needs to be attached to something and its hard to attach it to the tile.
    A big there. I did a subfloor in my kitchen, over old, crappy, nasty laminate. We used big sheets of luan plywood secured by drywall screws. I think we ended up using somewhere around 1200 screws. I can't imagine how hard that would have been driving those screws into ceramic tile.

  8. #188
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;2288433;
    I talked to a guy at the equipment rental place who was so discouraging about the reality of doing it ourselves that I had to think twice (or more) about it. If the person who will make money out of you doing something tries to talk you out of doing that something, there will likely be trouble.
    I looked up this topic on Bob Vila's website and he discourages sandblasting even by a pro. He recommends you hire a contractor to use chemicals to remove the paint. I read elsewhere that on some older homes (circa 1900), the brick was meant to be painted.
    If it helps any, your color choices sound quite pretty.
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough." - Mario Andretti

  9. #189
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;2288433;
    ... I'm currently leaning towards not, but that means the siding we put up can't be a nice natural wood, it will have to be coloured and the brick painted to match (I'm leaning toward blue/grey with midnight blue trim).
    I like your color choices as well.

    I have a fireplace that my Dad built by hand. It's plywood with those awful beige colored bricks all over it. It used to have one of those little electric units with lights in it. It was never a real fireplace. After I got my little house, Dad thought of throwing it out,which I wouldn't hear of it. We used to hang our stockings on it and all. So it was moved into my basement. He said he would never, ever move that thing again because the bricks made it so heavy. If I ever sold the house, it would stay with it.

    My Dad doesn't think it's worth removing the bricks. It would be a hard job and messy. But I don't know if there is a paint that will adhere to brick. Does anyone know? It has a very plain mantle and black shiny mirror (?) around where the insert was to go.
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  10. #190
    Trouble in my life just1paul's Avatar
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    Brick can be painted, but needs to be primed first. Wherever you buy your paint just get some primer. then paint after that dries. Of course you need to clean the bricks first if dirty.
    - The Dean Martin Show -

    Petula Clark: You know they say you can't buy happiness.
    Dean Martin: No but you can pour it..

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