+ Reply to Thread
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567
Results 61 to 69 of 69

Thread: The FORT science outreach project

  1. #61
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    in a good place
    Posts
    27,046
    Quote Originally Posted by astrogirl_2100
    I actually never owned a telescope. At one point in college, one of my teacher told me to stay away from telescopes. I was happy to oblige, I always wanted to work in theoretical astrophysics. One time we had our yearly astronomi student union weekend, and some of the other students brought the Student telescope. Couldn't tell you what kind it was, but it was a big one and we looked at Saturn and you could clearly see the rings, it was pretty cool.
    Just catching up on this thread when I saw this. Color me surprised, Astrogirl! I just assumed you astrophysicists spent your evenings and weekends looking at the stars.
    You've gotta hustle if you want to earn a dollar. - Boston Rob

  2. #62
    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nivå, Denmark
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,237
    Quote Originally Posted by hepcat
    Just catching up on this thread when I saw this. Color me surprised, Astrogirl! I just assumed you astrophysicists spent your evenings and weekends looking at the stars.
    Nah, we sit in front of computers and write code. Astronomers look at the stars, we make a computer models of them.

    When I do participate in outreach projects, I prefer being at a booth where there are no experiments, so no-one gets hurt. Last time I sat at a booth where little kids could sit down and make pictures of aliens. Most of the kids started out by drawing a picture that looked like a person, but as soon as I asked them "do you think aliens have two arms and two legs like we do?" or "what does your alien eat?" they got really into it. One kid make a picture of an alien with 3 arms and 3 legs and 3 fingers, who only ate icecream. Another on made a drawing of a big blue ball with legs and arms poking out all over, and called the alien Frank. I love kids

    ETA: Astronomers actually also sit in front of computers, the computer control the telescope/sattelite and the astronomer has to spend most of his/her time doing digital image processing, to get rid of various kinds of noise in the pictures.

  3. #63
    Can They Do It?? mrdobolina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    The Miami of Canada
    Age
    42
    Posts
    3,254
    So here's a question for you AG--

    Is it possible to put a satellite in orbit around the sun? I know that its possible, but the type of orbit I am talking about would not be a huge elliptical orbit, but be more round, and planetary. I guess what I am trying to ask is if it's possible to put a satellite into a an orbit such as in between earth and venus, with an orbit time around the sun of just under a year. A round orbit.

    Also, would it be possible to put something in space that never moved in relation to the sun? I would think not....that everything must be moving in space.
    "You don't own a TV?!? What's all your furniture pointed at?" Joey Tribianni

    It's not who you are underneath, but what you do that defines you.

  4. #64
    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nivå, Denmark
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,237
    Quote Originally Posted by mrdobolina
    So here's a question for you AG--

    Is it possible to put a satellite in orbit around the sun? I know that its possible, but the type of orbit I am talking about would not be a huge elliptical orbit, but be more round, and planetary. I guess what I am trying to ask is if it's possible to put a satellite into a an orbit such as in between earth and venus, with an orbit time around the sun of just under a year. A round orbit.
    Sure you can put a sattelite in orbit around the sun. The SOHO experiment does exactly that http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/ . The ulysses project also sends a satelitte in orbit around the sun, but in a polar orbit. There is a really cool java application at http://ulysses.jpl.nasa.gov/ where you can see the orbit.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrdobolina
    Also, would it be possible to put something in space that never moved in relation to the sun? I would think not....that everything must be moving in space.
    Well, you can but a sattelite in orbit around the Earth that follows the earths rotation, so it will always be at the exact same point relative to the Earth. That is what communication sattelites do. It would be no good if the sattelites moved around, so you'd have to adjust your dish to point at the right place. You could do the same with the sun, although the suns surface is not stationary like the Earths. However, the sattelite moves in the orbit, but you can make the orbit such that it looks like it stands still relative to the Earths surface. Does that answer your question?

  5. #65
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    9,925
    I had to bump this thread, because a) it is, imo, the very best thread in the history of all messageboards, but also because b) I have another question.

    Astrogirl, I saw a documentary a few days ago on a man named Dr. Ronald Mallett, who is working out of the University of Connecticut. I'm not sure how long ago it was filmed, or if his work has been discredited in the interim, but the basic gist of the show was that he had worked out a theoretical method of time travel. All that was left was building the actual apparatus. I looked up his journal article (which you can read by clicking here), but it's by far beyond my understanding. So I'm wondering what people "in the industry" think about his work. Some of the ideas outlined in the show were hugely fascinating, but I know that science documentaries always go heavy on the "Wow!" factor, in an effort to appeal to the masses.

  6. #66
    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nivå, Denmark
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,237
    Quote Originally Posted by Amanda
    Astrogirl, I saw a documentary a few days ago on a man named Dr. Ronald Mallett, who is working out of the University of Connecticut. I'm not sure how long ago it was filmed, or if his work has been discredited in the interim, but the basic gist of the show was that he had worked out a theoretical method of time travel. All that was left was building the actual apparatus. I looked up his journal article (which you can read by clicking here), but it's by far beyond my understanding. So I'm wondering what people "in the industry" think about his work. Some of the ideas outlined in the show were hugely fascinating, but I know that science documentaries always go heavy on the "Wow!" factor, in an effort to appeal to the masses.
    I read the letter, which is actually not about time travel but about how to make light generate a gravitational field. The paper is about linearized gravity which means weak field gravity. I'm not seing anything about time travel in the paper. I've never heard of it, but since it has been accepted by a reputable journal I think it is valid. I checked the internet archives for papers by this author, but he hasn't published anything, from what I could find, about time travel. Maybe that was pure speculation. Based on facts ofcourse but not anything that has actually been found by studying the equations.

    Anyway, I hadn't heard of this before.

  7. #67
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    9,925
    I love it. The article was so beyond my comprehension that I couldn't even tell that wasn't the correct topic. That's classic.

    Okay, give me a few minutes. I'll try to find one that's more appropriate.

    Although, from what I understood from the show, there was some way that a ring formation of lasers was going to allow time travel. But again, waaaay over my head. All of it.

  8. #68
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    9,925
    Okay, here: http://www.spacedaily.com/news/timetravel-01a.html

    That's not a journal, obviously, but it references his publications in it.

    Actually, now that I'm searching, I'm finding that the reference made in that article is to the link I posted in the first message. So I guess it is somehow related.

  9. #69
    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nivå, Denmark
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,237
    Quote Originally Posted by Amanda
    Okay, here: http://www.spacedaily.com/news/timetravel-01a.html

    That's not a journal, obviously, but it references his publications in it.

    Actually, now that I'm searching, I'm finding that the reference made in that article is to the link I posted in the first message. So I guess it is somehow related.
    Yeah, the article, as I read it, deals with the gravitational field created by a laser beam. However, All calculations are done in linearized gravity. If he wants to understand what happens in a strong gravitational field (needed for a time machine) he must use the full Einstein equations, not just the linearized version. I'm not sure that the equations can even be solved analytically in this case (that's why I sit here and make computer models every day, the full Einstein equations can usually not be solved analytically). Even though it is possible to slow down light (that was done by a Danish scientist by the way, we're all very proud of her) to create a strong gravitational field, we don't know how the experiment will behave because we have not done the proper calculations.

    It will be interssting to see what the planned experiemnts show. For now it looks like this is a good idea but not really on either theoretical or experimental firm ground.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.