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Thread: Moving to Queens

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    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
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    Moving to Queens

    Hi Guys

    So I got a new job and Long Island University, CW Post campus, which is in Brookville, NY. I want to live near my job, but I also want to live near the city. I've been looking at Queens as a good place. I want to live near a subway stop, but again, not too far from work. I've looked at the subway map and come up with Jamaica or Flushing. Trouble is, I don't really know the first thing about those neighbourhoods and would really appreciate any info you guys can give me. I'd also consider moving to a neighbourhood with a subway station closer to the city, if it has easy acces to roads that lead to Brookville (I-495 or route 107).

    I've decided to ask everybody if they have any information that could use, so that includes the combined resources of the FORT Anything from infortaion about the "atmosphere" and parking situation in a given neighbourhood to tips on finding an apartment: websites, who to stay away from, what I need to know before I look for an apartment and so on, will be greatly appreciated. And I'm looking for a cheap-ish studio apartment, so if you happen to know someone who knows someone who's heard of a great studio thats avalible, please let me know. I'll be moving in mid-August.

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    Staying Afloat speedbump's Avatar
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    Went with a friend to visit his parents in Queens 2 years ago. The part we were in wasn't nice. Gunshots and police sirens all night long. That's the only experience I have of Queens.
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    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedbump
    Went with a friend to visit his parents in Queens 2 years ago. The part we were in wasn't nice. Gunshots and police sirens all night long. That's the only experience I have of Queens.
    What part was that? I'd like to know so I can avoid it!

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    Don't Panic senrik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by astrogirl_2100
    Hi Guys

    So I got a new job and Long Island University, CW Post campus, which is in Brookville, NY. I want to live near my job, but I also want to live near the city. I've been looking at Queens as a good place. I want to live near a subway stop, but again, not too far from work. I've looked at the subway map and come up with Jamaica or Flushing. Trouble is, I don't really know the first thing about those neighbourhoods and would really appreciate any info you guys can give me. I'd also consider moving to a neighbourhood with a subway station closer to the city, if it has easy acces to roads that lead to Brookville (I-495 or route 107).

    I've decided to ask everybody if they have any information that could use, so that includes the combined resources of the FORT Anything from infortaion about the "atmosphere" and parking situation in a given neighbourhood to tips on finding an apartment: websites, who to stay away from, what I need to know before I look for an apartment and so on, will be greatly appreciated. And I'm looking for a cheap-ish studio apartment, so if you happen to know someone who knows someone who's heard of a great studio thats avalible, please let me know. I'll be moving in mid-August.
    Firstly, as a former NYer (i lived there 33 years before moving last year), I'll tell you a few things.

    1. the subways do not go into Nassau county. If you are looking at public transport, you should look more at the Long Island Railroad. Specifically, any route that goes into hicksville. You really have two choices as to the lines, if you want to remain in NYC. There's the Brooklyn Line, but after Jamaica, the areas where this line is might make a non-new yorker pause. Then there's the line that heads to Penn Station. This makes stops in Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, and Woodside.

    Jamaica? That area is pretty hit or miss in terms of the quality of the area. Its hard to know what you are getting into without being in New York for that neighborhood.

    I'm Inclined to tell you that you might prefer Kew Gardens. For those with a car, it should be easy to get there. (Take the Grand Central Parkway (which becomes the northern State parkway at the queens/LI border), and transfer to 495 (the Long Island Expressway, aka the worlds longest parking lot).

    Parking situation in NYC. In general, it is bad. Some areas are worse than others. You see, NYC was never really built for cars, and the highrises were not really developed with the idea of a car for every person. Sure, its better car-wise than Manhattan, but only to a small degree.

    NYC is a city of ethnic neighborhoods. Flushing tends to have predominately people of asian ethnicity. Jamaica tends to have more African Americans and hispanics. Flushing is generally more crowded than Jamaica.

    Cleanliness: NYC in general is pretty dirty. And from what I see, the more dense the population, the dirtier it gets.

    Noise and Crime: its a noisy city, and being a large city has a lot of crime. If you want to avoid it, stay away from NYC
    I would really suggest you visit both areas before you make any decisions.
    Last edited by senrik; 05-12-2004 at 04:50 PM.
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    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by senrik
    Firstly, as a former NYer (i lived there 33 years before moving last year), I'll tell you a few things.

    1. the subways do not go into Nassau county. If you are looking at public transport, you should look more at the Long Island Railroad. Specifically, any route that goes into hicksville. You really have two choices as to the lines, if you want to remain in NYC. There's the Brooklyn Line, but after Jamaica, the areas where this line is might make a non-new yorker pause. Then there's the line that heads to Penn Station. This makes stops in Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, and Woodside.
    I'm not thinking about taking public transportation to work. I'll use my car. But I want to be able to have easy (and cheap) access to Manhattan and all it's glory.

    Quote Originally Posted by senrik
    Jamaica? That area is pretty hit or miss in terms of the quality of the area. Its hard to know what you are getting into without being in New York for that neighborhood.

    I'm Inclined to tell you that you might prefer Kew Gardens. For those with a car, it should be easy to get there. (Take the Grand Central Parkway (which becomes the northern State parkway at the queens/LI border), and transfer to 495 (the Long Island Expressway, aka the worlds longest parking lot).
    That sounds like an idea, I'll check out Kew Gardens. I fear that it will be difficult getting around by car, but I also figured that since I will be going away from the city in the morning and towards the city in the evening it might be a bit better than going the other way. I've lived in other big cities, and that was the rule. My hours are very flexible, so I go to and leave work at hours where trafic is not too bad.

    Quote Originally Posted by senrik
    Parking situation in NYC. In general, it is bad. Some areas are worse than others. You see, NYC was never really built for cars, and the highrises were not really developed with the idea of a car for every person. Sure, its better car-wise than Manhattan, but only to a small degree.
    I've heard of people in Queens finding parking in the streets and that works for them. But what do I know? I guess it all depends on the neighborhood, but it's hard to get a feel for a neighborhood from afar. I have plans to go on a weekend scouting expedition before I commit to a given place. I am putting Kew Gardens on my list of places to check out. I figure I'll park at JFK long term parking and find a hotel there and just ride the subway to different neighborhoods and check them out. Any other ideas for neighborhoods I should check out?

    Quote Originally Posted by senrik
    NYC is a city of ethnic neighborhoods. Flushing tends to have predominately people of asian ethnicity. Jamaica tends to have more African Americans and hispanics. Flushing is generally more crowded than Jamaica.

    Cleanliness: NYC in general is pretty dirty. And from what I see, the more dense the population, the dirtier it gets.

    Noise and Crime: its a noisy city, and being a large city has a lot of crime. If you want to avoid it, stay away from NYC
    I would really suggest you visit both areas before you make any decisions.
    In general, I like living in cities, and I like ethnic neigborhoods. I'm as scared of crime as anyone else, I guess, but I've got to live somewhere near my work, and I really hate suburbia or small town type places.

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    Ready? haejin's Avatar
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    I live in Flushing, and some parts of it isn't that bad. It's a pretty nice neighborhood near where I live, unlike downtown Flushing closer to Main St. The Linden Hill and Mitchell Gardens co-ops are fairly nice, it's a bit cleaner there and the parking's good. The pricing I'm not sure of though.

    To get to the LIE, you go onto the Van Wyck, which is along Northern Blvd (or something, whatever it is, its number is 678), then change to the LIE. There's also a subway station at Main St that goes to Manhattan (Grand Central and Times Square).
    Gustav Holst was right!

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    Don't Panic senrik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by haejin
    I live in Flushing, and some parts of it isn't that bad. It's a pretty nice neighborhood near where I live, unlike downtown Flushing closer to Main St. The Linden Hill and Mitchell Gardens co-ops are fairly nice, it's a bit cleaner there and the parking's good. The pricing I'm not sure of though.

    To get to the LIE, you go onto the Van Wyck, which is along Northern Blvd (or something, whatever it is, its number is 678), then change to the LIE. There's also a subway station at Main St that goes to Manhattan (Grand Central and Times Square).
    I think you touched on it a bit Haej, but I'd like to eleborate on it from the view of someone who has lived in Flushing and owned property.

    Downtown Flushing was kind of over developed back in the mid to late 80's when a large influx of Chinese and Koreans moved into the area. A lot went into real estate Speculation, which kind of put some strain on the infrastructure. To my values at least, there is a bit of a water pressure issue on higher floor apartments in the area (above 5th floor) that have no water towers on the roof.

    FWIW, My best friends parents live in Mitchell Gardens, and have done so since before it was converted.

    another thing you talked about is not real common outside of NYC, namely Cooperative apartments (aka coops). For those on the outside, it acts much like a condominium offering, with a few differences.

    1. asking price is less, and monthly maintenence is more than a condo.
    2. Technically you are buying shares in a corporation that owns the building, and then using the shares to inhabit an apartment.
    3. because of 2. a board of directors tends to interview any applicant.
    4. also because of 2, what you are allowed to do to your apartment is limited.

    If you have no plan to buy a place to live, ignore coops and what I just said. However the reason for coop popularity in NYC is due to the cost of housing in NYC. Rents are not cheap anywhere in NYC. One bedroom apartments are hard to find below $1000 a month, even in the most dangerous of areas. Rent control is impossible to get into unless you know someone (despite the popularity in Friends). People do Coops so that they have a cheap place to live....
    "The purpose of the new capitalism is to shoot the wounded." ~ Andy Grove, Chairman, Intel Corporation

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    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by senrik
    If you have no plan to buy a place to live, ignore coops and what I just said.
    My contract is only for a year (although it can be extended) so I'm not really looking to buy. But it is very confusing to try to find out anything about apartments, especially long disrance. I appreciate the help I'm getting here! Does anyone else live in or have friends in Queens?

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    FORT Fogey Glitternerfball's Avatar
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    I have friends in Astoria, very nice neighborhood - Greek neighborhood, mostly houses that you can rent, so the rent varies depending on the owner, from 800 and up for a nice place.

    I've also been to Forest Hills which is gorgwous, more expensive type of place in Queens.

    Astoria is very commuter friendly, near the subway stations and street parking, although my friend had a garage.

    The thing with NY is that it is separated into these 'neighborhoods' for instance, I live in a nice Manhattan neughborhood, everyone knows each other, very home town kind of feel. But walk like 6 blocks down, or cross the main street, and it's completely different. I feel safe walking around at night within like a 10 block radious, but then it's dicey, then after those other ten blocks - it's great again.

    And cars, well - we have parking in my area, but kids love to smash the windows at night. Apparently sheepshead Bay is #1 in car thefts, if you go to nyc.gov and look around, there are neighborhood crime statistics you might be interested in looking at.

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    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glitternerfball
    I have friends in Astoria, very nice neighborhood - Greek neighborhood, mostly houses that you can rent, so the rent varies depending on the owner, from 800 and up for a nice place.

    I've also been to Forest Hills which is gorgwous, more expensive type of place in Queens.

    Astoria is very commuter friendly, near the subway stations and street parking, although my friend had a garage.
    Yes, I have heard lots of good things about Astoria, but I think it's to far away from my job. I have added Forest Hills to my list of potential neighbourhoods

    Quote Originally Posted by Glitternerfball
    The thing with NY is that it is separated into these 'neighborhoods' for instance, I live in a nice Manhattan neughborhood, everyone knows each other, very home town kind of feel. But walk like 6 blocks down, or cross the main street, and it's completely different. I feel safe walking around at night within like a 10 block radious, but then it's dicey, then after those other ten blocks - it's great again.
    That's why it's so hard to figure out where the good places are. But thanks to you and Senrik I am looking into Forrest Hills and Kew Gardens, and if you have any other suggestions, please let me know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Glitternerfball
    And cars, well - we have parking in my area, but kids love to smash the windows at night. Apparently sheepshead Bay is #1 in car thefts, if you go to nyc.gov and look around, there are neighborhood crime statistics you might be interested in looking at.
    I've been looking at crime statistic for all neighborhoods. I also look at the % of people with college degrees, I think it tells a lot about what type of people live in a given neighbourhood. I would like to live a place where it is relatively safe to go out at night. My problem is that I don't have a lot of money, so I am looking at studios with rent in the cheap end of the spectrum. And I have no idea if cheap rent means bad neighbourhood, and how much a studio would be in a good neigbourhood as supposed to in a bad one.

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