+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 47

Thread: Second Languages

  1. #21
    So Far Away Yellow Apple's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    She'll be there when I'm gone... won't she?
    Posts
    2,427
    I took a fair bit of Spanish in college, but I've forgotten a good bit of it by now. I still remember enough to be dangerous (but only to myself). I also have quite a few other language dictionaries that I've sort of skimmed through, so I know a few words of German, Arabic, and Magyar Hungarian. Maybe enough for one sentence, and that's it.
    R.I.P Willie Dog (?/?/1989-12/17/2004). Gone but never forgotten.

    Welcome Zelda (and a hot of other names)! (Born 08/08/2005, adopted 10/08/2005)

    Also welcome Shasta! (Born ?/?/2004, Adopted 03/??/07)

  2. #22
    FORT Newbie Selene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Age
    32
    Posts
    18
    I'm a language nut. I studied in Madrid for a summer while in high school, so at one time I was fluent in Spanish (not so much anymore, it's been a while.) I'm majoring in linguistics at college right now and I'm required to pick up a few languages, so I've also studied Russian (my minor), German, and Arabic.

    Wish I could somehow specialize in an Arabic dialect, though... they only teach Standard Arabic (fus'ha) at my school, which is really only used by people at the universities. So I can talk to a professor in Egypt, but not to the guy in the marketplace.... and even then, the extent of my knowledge is "good morning," "praise be to Allah" and a whole slew of swear words that I can't repeat here (don't ask!)

  3. #23
    It's all a Mystery to Me KaiCee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    796
    My second language is ASL (American Sign Language). It counts as a second language for college requirements in California. I began learning it because of the ever increasing hearing impairment I have. Although I can speak and "hear" spoken words...sometimes sign language comes in handy. But like any language, you have to practice. I used to socialize with Deaf people a lot...but haven't done that for awhile. The only other person that I know that can communicate in ASL is my daughter (takes it in college as her second language)...so I only use it with her now. I'm thinking of getting back into an ASL class so I won't lose my ability to sign.
    When you learn, teach. When you get, give. ~ Maya Angelou

  4. #24
    Evil Slash Crazy Miss Filangi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Looking for a place to happen
    Age
    40
    Posts
    11,376
    That's cool KaiCee. I've always wanted to learn sign language.

    First language is English, second language is French. I'm amazed at how many people there are here whose first language is not French. Impressive.
    If you go through a lot of hammers each month, I don't think it necessarily means you're a hard worker.
    It may just mean that you have a lot to learn about proper hammer maintenance.


  5. #25
    Hockey is life! EvaLaruefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Montreal,Canada
    Age
    39
    Posts
    3,209
    I laso think it's great for those of you who know sign language, good for you. I know the alphabet atleast so if I'm stuck, I could atleast spell my way through stuff.

  6. #26
    Under Investigation Tirlittan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    2,092
    Sign language is very neat, and I always wanted to learn it. It is just a shame that sign language is different in every country, too. Would I like to learn American (...English my 3rd foreign language) or Finnish (my native language) sign language? I also speak German (first foreign language, and my major as well), and Swedish (2nd foreign language). I would like to study Spanish and French, but I am so lazy to learn more languages right now. Besides, I believe that learning languages is most efficient when one is forced to talk with native speakers, and right now there are no native Spanish/French speakers around me who could not speak perfect English as well. Although, maybe things will change regarding French; my husband is threatening/planning to apply for a job in Switzerland, he doesn't think they will even consider him, but one never knows... And I took a little Latin in College, but I have pretty much forgotten all grammar and vocabulary (I could not write a sentence right now, and probably not even translate one).
    ps. This is just my opinion in the matter.

  7. #27
    FORT Fogey Frostelized's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Northern Georgia
    Age
    26
    Posts
    4,122
    Oh, I would love to learn Japanese & French! I should ask my math tutor to teach me Japanese. :\

    I speak Korean & English.

  8. #28
    Nevermind Lotuslander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lotusland of course
    Posts
    2,107
    I used to be fluent in French, as I grew up in a French neighborhood, but with anglophile parents, and then I lived in Germany for awhile and speak some German. I think for English speaking people, German is the easiest to learn as it is so close to English. Japanese, Frosty, I've heard is extremely difficult to learn. I keep losing my language skills though, as I just don't use them much anymore.

  9. #29
    FORT scientist astrogirl_2100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nivå, Denmark
    Age
    40
    Posts
    1,237
    My fist language is Danish. My second is English. My German is also pretty good, I can read books and newspapers and understand what people say, but I still have some psychological barrier so I'm uncomfortable speaking German (I can, though). In other words my passive vocabulary is very strong in German, but my active vocabulary is not that great. I've learned Spanish, Russian and Latin in school also, but my understanding of those languages is not great. I could brush it up pretty quick though , I think, when I went to Mexico for a conference, a lot of Spanish came back to me.

    Since I am Danish, I also understand Swedish and Norwegian (but the "ny-norsk" dialect has me totally stumped). I think that any Scandinavian who has to resort to English in order to understand another Scandinavian is not concentrating enough. It's easy when you focus. On Scandinavian Airlines flights, all messages are given in one Scandinavian language and in English, so we are expected to understand either one or the other. I'd never, ever speak in English to a Norwegian or Swede, I'd repeat myself or slow down if they didn't understand me, but not switch to English. There is a principle involved.

  10. #30
    Under Investigation Tirlittan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    2,092
    Astrogirl, when I went to Danemark, I could not understand the normally spoken Danish, but if people sloooooowed down when talking to me, I could understand it. I can read written Norwegian and Danish okay, not as good as Swedish, but I would think I could guess enough to get along. Same is with Dutch (because of German influence) I can sometimes understand a little bit if I think about it a bit. I lived a year in Germany while in high school, and after I came home I had a bad habit to just make up Swedish words from German words (instead of looking up the proper words in dictionary). Often I got it right, but sometimes not (not good when writing essays ).
    ps. This is just my opinion in the matter.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.