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Thread: Grammar

  1. #461
    Leaning Forward cantstopwatchin's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    Funny, I didn't realize this was a topic but I had to add this--

    So we were playing a Wii game today with the kids and I came in first. My husband was bemoaning that fact to the kids and said, "Daddy didn't do too good." My 5-year-old son corrected him and said, "Didn't do too well, Daddy." Guess I correct my husband's grammar more than I thought.
    "We must overcome the notion that we must be regular...it robs you of the chance to be extraordinary and leads you to the mediocre." - Uta Hagen

    “I don’t want my pain erased! As wretched as it is, I need my pain… It makes me who I am. It makes me Grumpy.” - Grumpy, Once Upon a Time

  2. #462
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    Hate to hear people say the American bastardized "ying yang", as opposed to the actual phrase "yin yang".
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

    When you throw a rock into a pack of dogs, you know which one you hit by the one that yelps!

  3. #463
    FORT Fogey Bonbonlover's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    1. yin yang = an ancient concept and symbol referring to complementary opposites

    2. ying-yang = slang term for the anus. ex. "Blow it out your ying yang, jerk!"
    Okay I love FORT's casino, but I really am not very good. If anyone wants to donate their FORT $$ I would gladly accept http://www.fansofrealitytv.com/forum....php?do=donate

  4. #464
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    So far, it has been my experience that "ying-yang", as your definition has it, has been used interchangably with "yin yang". I'm willing to bet you that most people don't know that "yin yang" exists, or that ying-yang is a slang term.
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

    When you throw a rock into a pack of dogs, you know which one you hit by the one that yelps!

  5. #465
    FORT Fogey Bonbonlover's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    Oh I think you are right... I just laugh because as they are trying to use Chinese philosophy, they are in fact using some sort of ghetto slang.
    Okay I love FORT's casino, but I really am not very good. If anyone wants to donate their FORT $$ I would gladly accept http://www.fansofrealitytv.com/forum....php?do=donate

  6. #466
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonbonlover;3777886;
    1. yin yang = an ancient concept and symbol referring to complementary opposites

    2. ying-yang = slang term for the anus. ex. "Blow it out your ying yang, jerk!"
    Kudos on using "complementary" correctly. It's a peeve of mine that I have mentioned before, the apparent interchangeability of "complementary" and "complimentary". I have actually been seeing it in professional print lately (ads and what-have-you). I will start writing letters if people don't smarten up.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  7. #467
    That's all folks! Unklescott's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    Tweets, sexting "unfriended" in U.S. banned word list - Yahoo! News


    By Carey Gillam Carey Gillam – Thu Dec 31, 12:30 pm ET

    KANSAS CITY (Reuters) – If you recently tweeted about how you were chillaxin for the holiday, take note: Fifteen particularly over- or mis-used words and phrases have been declared "shovel-ready" to be "unfriended" by a U.S. university's annual list of terms that deserve to be banned.

    After thousands of nominations of words and phrases commonly used in marketing, media, technology and elsewhere, wordsmiths at Lake Superior State University on Thursday issued their 35th annual list of words that they believe should be banned.

    Tops on the Michigan university's list of useless phrases was "shovel-ready." The term refers to infrastructure projects that are ready to break ground and was popularly used to describe road, bridge and other construction projects fueled by stimulus funds from the Obama administration.

    And speaking of stimulus, that word -- which was applied to government spending aimed at boosting the economy -- made the over-used category as well, along with an odd assortment of Obama-related constructions such as Obamacare and Obamanomics.

    "We say Obamanough already," the LSSU committee said.

    Also ripe for exile is "sexting," shorthand for sexy text messaging, a habit that has caused trouble this year for public figures from politicians to star athletes.

    Similarly, list makers showed distaste for tweeting, retweeting and tweetaholics, lingo made popular by users of the popular Twitter networking website. And don't even get them started on the use of friend as a verb, as in: "He made me mad so I unfriended him on Facebook," an Internet social site.

    Male acquaintances need to find another word than "bromance" for their friendships, and the combination of "chillin" and "relaxin'" into "chillaxin" was an easy pick for banishment.

    VOTED OUT

    Also making the list was "teachable moment."

    "This phrase is used to describe everything from potty-training to politics. It's time to vote it out!" said one list contributor.

    "Toxic assets," referring to financial instruments that have plunged in value, sickened list makers so much the phrase was added to the list, along with the tiresome and poorly defined "too big to fail" which has often been invoked to describe wobbly U.S. banks.

    Similarly, "in these economic times" was deemed overdue for banishment due.

    Also making the list -- "transparent/transparency," typically used, contributors said, when the situation is anything but transparent.

    One list contributor wanted to know if there was an "app," short-hand for "application" popularized by the mobile iPhone's growing array of software tools, for making that annoying word go away.

    And rounding out the list -- "czar" as in car czar, drug czar, housing czar or banished word czar.

    "Purging our language of 'toxic assets' is a 'stimulus' effort that's 'too big to fail,'" said a university spokesman.

  8. #468
    FORT Fogey Missyboxers's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    The Oatmeal has Ten Words You Need To Stop Misspelling and How to Use an Apostrophe. I found them amusing.

  9. #469
    FORT Fogey Missyboxers's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    Awhile back, we were having the discussion on following "than" with "what" and "that which." I'm watching the Packers-Cards game and Troy Aikman just said that Aaron Rodgers "had to hold onto the ball for a lot longer than what he wanted to." I know I was wrong about my earlier example, so is this right or wrong?

  10. #470
    Over and Out! Bunny555's Avatar
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    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Missyboxers;3791836;
    Awhile back, we were having the discussion on following "than" with "what" and "that which." I'm watching the Packers-Cards game and Troy Aikman just said that Aaron Rodgers "had to hold onto the ball for a lot longer than what he wanted to." I know I was wrong about my earlier example, so is this right or wrong?
    I'm no grammar expert, but in my opinion, the word "what" does not belong in that sentence.
    CYA

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